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To assist my core muscles get stronger, I began physiotherapy on July 22. The visit included what appeared to be light exercise (slight knee movements while lying on my back, a Pilate's spring strapped to my knee), but it felt off and subluxed my hip right away. Only after three months of recovery and recuperation was I able to resume physical therapy. I receive criticism from my therapist for the body positions I unconsciously assume while performing daily tasks as well as for not doing more to improve my muscles. Do other people experience the same thing? What kind of exercise do you engage in? Can someone offer advice on this matter?
 

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To assist my core muscles get stronger, I began physiotherapy on July 22. The visit included what appeared to be light exercise (slight knee movements while lying on my back, a Pilate's spring strapped to my knee), but it felt off and subluxed my hip right away. Only after three months of recovery and recuperation was I able to resume physical therapy. I receive criticism from my therapist for the body positions I unconsciously assume while performing daily tasks as well as for not doing more to improve my muscles. Do other people experience the same thing? What kind of exercise do you engage in? Can someone offer advice on this matter?
I believe the PT does help, if done correctly. When I fractured my humerus, tearing the muscle off the bone, I could barely move my arm. The surgeon said I may never be able to raise my elbow higher than my eyes. While waiting 2 weeks for my PT start, I went online and found an exercise program. I did my PT faithfully 2 x a week at rehab and every day at home. It was painful to do at first. But ice packs and Tylenol as needed helped. I never used the prescription pain killers. I'm pleased to say that I can raise my arm straight up over my head and can do up my bra in the back without pain. I'm 75 now and that was about 3 years ago. If you can access YouTube, look up Bob and Brad. They have many videos to help you with posture, rehab and flexibility. As we get older it's portant to keep moving.Good luck.
 

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To assist my core muscles get stronger, I began physiotherapy on July 22. The visit included what appeared to be light exercise (slight knee movements while lying on my back, a Pilate's spring strapped to my knee), but it felt off and subluxed my hip right away. Only after three months of recovery and recuperation was I able to resume physical therapy. I receive criticism from my therapist for the body positions I unconsciously assume while performing daily tasks as well as for not doing more to improve my muscles. Do other people experience the same thing? What kind of exercise do you engage in? Can someone offer advice on this matter?
I have tried PT for an impingement in my shoulder, severe back pain, and vertigo, among other things, and the least good it did was nothing at all. The most serious was making things worse, and that happened in most instances. I am still sleeping in my recliner due to my shoulder impingement from last fall, and it's not certain if or when I'll be able to return to bed! PT has never served me well, and if ever suggested again, I will say "No thank you!"
 

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I agree with JoanDL that PT done right does help. Not done right and it can aggravate things even more. It is hard to break the unconscious bad habits of poor posture, and incorrect lifting and reaching. But if that is your goal then it can surely be done. It does mean being super conscious of what you are doing and how you are doing it until the 'right way' becomes habit. All sucess with PT truly hinges on how hard you are willing to work at things. Like Joan said she did stuff 2 times a week with the PT therapist but also did every day on her own. The people that I know that will only do once or twice a week with the therapist don't usually have as good an outcome as those that are willing to make themselves do it when nobody else is there to tell them what to do. Is your therapist truly criticizing you or just pointing out that your usual way of doing is hurting things instead of helping? If it is personality clash maybe working with different PT person would make a difference. If it is just that you don't like someone else telling you that the way you are doing something is wrong that is a different issue altogether. Not trying to be mean, just trying to point out that PT isn't always easy.
 

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Physical therapy is hard. You have to do the follow up home care exercises. if you want to get better and that takes lots of time and energy. You do have to change how you do things at home. I repadded my usual sitting chair. I changed the position I knit in. I did a number of things to prevent further strain and damage. I am continuing to exercise, not just what I was taught but other exercise as well because the body is one big interconnected unit.
You get out of it what you put into it. If you are a passive personality type you most likely will not benefit. You have to want to be better.
I have done lots of physical therapy for my arthritis and injuries over the years and the physical therapists have instructed and corrected but not 'criticized'.
I firmly believe PT is the only way to recuperate.
 

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I recommend PT if your doctor orders it. I have found that it definitely helps with whatever problem you have.

Several years ago I injured my left shoulder while hot air ballooning. I ended up going to therapy for about 4 months to alleviate the problem. It worked. No surgery, no more PT, shoulder was fine. I still do some of the exercises to keep the upper body limber and agile.

Then I had problems with sciatica. Pain in left buttock, running down my leg. Went to PT for about 2 months and learned stretching exercises which alleviated the pain. Still do those exercises whenever I feel any pain.

As a senior citizen, I also do balance exercises to help me with my equilibrium and hopefully, keep me from a fall. I do those every day.

Exercise is good for you, as long as it's what the doctor/PT advises. It helps keep our bodies lithe and agile.
 

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I agree pt is hard work, and I am looking at having to do some here soon because I tore my mcl, and am healing slowly. I know I will have to get some therapy because after sitting for a while I am so stiff and sore til I get moving, and it doesn't help that the weather isn't the greatest right now. I know some therapists can seem to be uncaring and non sympathetic, but know they have your best interest in mind and want you to get better. I pray it will get easier for you and you will be back to good health quickly.
 

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PT can be great or damaging, there are a lot of factors involved. First, have a good talk with your orthopedic doctor about goals, restrictions (immediate as well as long term), and if there should ever be pain. Most decent doctors will tell you that true pain, not just trying to push a bit extra, is your body saying to STOP.
There are good PTs and there are ones that should be shot. I had one I went to during knee injury recovery that insisted I do proper deep knee bends on my first visit. I showed her what I could do and she demanded I keep both feet flat in the ground. When I tried to explain that I had a fused ankle that did not, could not EVER flex due to the 5 4" screws in it she told no "no excuses" and pushed down hard on my shoulders. I screamed in pain and threatened her on the spot. I called my surgeon right in front of her, ignoring her demands to put my phone away. When he got on the line I put it in speaker so he could ream her out (I refused to let her hold my phone). All further appointments were with a different therapist and she is no longer at that location.
In the other hand, I have had very good d experiences with others in the same location who were very helpful and even told me they thought I was pushing myself too hard, too fast.
 

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Without the PT I have done, I would be crippled and unable to take care of myself. I do agree with what many have said...you need the right therapist, the right exercises, and to do them yourself at home as well as 2x a week at the therapy place.

I had a rotator cuff tear and a bicep resection. I got my range of motion and functionality back very quickly but I could not swim. Since I had been swimming 5x a week doing 20 laps a day, this was a problem. Continued PT until they figured out how to help me and went back to my swimming.

I did PT before my knee replacement to get my range of motion back to normal from having the rods and screws taken out From previous injury. The theory was that I would not regain what I didn't have to start with if I waited till after. Then, PT again after the TKR to get range of motion back again.

I wouldn't be able to bend my knee and walk properly without it.

so yes, PT works, as long as it is done right with the right person.

I'm so sorry for your troubles. I suggest you go to a pain management doctor and get a referral to the right facility and person. My doc just gave me a referral to a PT person who is treating the entire body to fix the issues I'm having with a specific pain. Long story to explain so I will be cryptic. So far, he is helping more than any other PT person I've seen.

good luck.
 

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I wouldn't just go online and look for exercises. A professional can determine the proper exercises appropriate for you according to the stage in the healing process. I needed PT for two issues. It took work, but eventually all my pain went away and range of motion returned to normal.
 

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To assist my core muscles get stronger, I began physiotherapy on July 22. The visit included what appeared to be light exercise (slight knee movements while lying on my back, a Pilate's spring strapped to my knee), but it felt off and subluxed my hip right away. Only after three months of recovery and recuperation was I able to resume physical therapy. I receive criticism from my therapist for the body positions I unconsciously assume while performing daily tasks as well as for not doing more to improve my muscles. Do other people experience the same thing? What kind of exercise do you engage in? Can someone offer advice on this matter?
I have to agree that PT works if you do it as taught. I’ve been through several rounds for different problems. So has my husband. It worked for us.
one thing I noticed was that you said something didn’t feel right before your hip went out. At that point you stop and talk to the therapist or your doctor.
i hope it goes well from now on.
 

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To assist my core muscles get stronger, I began physiotherapy on July 22. The visit included what appeared to be light exercise (slight knee movements while lying on my back, a Pilate's spring strapped to my knee), but it felt off and subluxed my hip right away. Only after three months of recovery and recuperation was I able to resume physical therapy. I receive criticism from my therapist for the body positions I unconsciously assume while performing daily tasks as well as for not doing more to improve my muscles. Do other people experience the same thing? What kind of exercise do you engage in? Can someone offer advice on this matter?
Yes muscle tone is important. I go to a phsio/pilates place twice a week., as I felt I was deteriorating, and out of breath etc I felt as though I would benefit from more so suggested an hour instead of the half hour weekly. They said No I would be better with 2 half hours a week, so I do this. I would not go to anything other than one-on-one where a person is watching your movements. They also suggested a massage would be good also I said Oh No I am not interested in massage parlours. They said it is not like that, so I went and found it was indeed very good, but she left and another one came which was by no means as good and I did not feel the benefit so cancelled any further appointments. I think a good masseur would be good. Do keep it up. If I am just at home I get lazy and do nothing, so this is compulsory, and yes I do feel better. They say I should go for a half hour walk every day which I always seem to find some excuse not to. I started off doing it but gave up. That too was a great help.
 

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I believe the PT does help, if done correctly. When I fractured my humerus, tearing the muscle off the bone, I could barely move my arm. The surgeon said I may never be able to raise my elbow higher than my eyes. While waiting 2 weeks for my PT start, I went online and found an exercise program. I did my PT faithfully 2 x a week at rehab and every day at home. It was painful to do at first. But ice packs and Tylenol as needed helped. I never used the prescription pain killers. I'm pleased to say that I can raise my arm straight up over my head and can do up my bra in the back without pain. I'm 75 now and that was about 3 years ago. If you can access YouTube, look up Bob and Brad. They have many videos to help you with posture, rehab and flexibility. As we get older it's portant to keep moving.Good luck.
Bob and Brad are great and I watch a lot of their videos. Their videos have helped me cope with my sciatica and other back problems.
 

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For me PT has been very helpful. I’ve gone for several pain issues but my most intensive therapy was after a fall when my humerus was shoved into itself at a slight angle. Because the angle was less than 15 degrees it was felt I could heal reasonably well without surgery. The break was at the level of my rotator cuff. Shortly after the break, I could not lift my arm to the side more than about 15 degrees, I could not move my arm behind my body at all. And to lift it over my head even when laying supine, I had to use my other arm. After doing PT for as long as my insurance would pay for, doing my exercises daily between visits and continuing them daily for a year after discharge then making a point of using my now shorter and more uncomfortable arm as much as possible to this day, I have regained about 98% of my range of motion and all my strength. Without PT my dominant arm would have been virtually useless. If needed I would definitely do PT again.

Let me add to this post that that fracture was about 12 years ago and with my now shorter and slightly rotated arm the only deficits I have are a shorter reach and limited range of motion only in reaching behind my back, but I can reach midline which I could not do before PT. But I was able to return to my job with no limitations and can do all my ADLs, care for myself, my house and my yard. All thanks to PT. And I go to the gym several days a week, and do some gentle yoga moves intermittently to this day, to maintain function of all body parts.
 
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