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The effect you are referring to is often called "rowing out". Sometimes blocking will resolve this, sometimes it is caused by a "change" in technique (such as raglan sleeve insertion). I have noticed this is less common with continental knitters than with those who "throw". I wouldn't worry about it, the piece looks very nice. We usually are our own worst critics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you very much. Another question. The double pointed needles shown I inherited from a grand mother in law and they are made of baleen. Can you take a guess at their age?
 

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I think you might have inadvertently twisted the last row knitted (needle on top in your photo) and when you knitted it, I think you started it from the wrong side, and made a twist??? You might need to carefully pull out, and redo this last row.
 

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Sometimes this happens to me when I've pulled a row out to correct an error and the loops are re-needled in the wrong direction.

Sometimes a particular yarn can be the cause.

I've also found that if I stop in the middle of a row and return to it later, my knitting is not as even.

There are many reasons and that's the beauty of hand knit items. They carry your 'mark' and love to anyone who sees them.
 

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Cathryn 2ed said:
I am creating unwanted horizontal ridges in the knit side of a stocking stitch which have corresponding horizontal ditches on the pearl side. Good grief, what am I doing wrong?
it looks like it is the pattern, i knitted a sweater and when doing the arms it turned out looking like that ,but it was suppose to.
 

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The owner of the LYS I used to work at told me that it's caused by different tension on the knit rows and purl rows. Since Contenintal knitters tend to draw their stitches tighter, they rarely have this problem. We have to used larger needles 'coz we knit too tight!

If this really bothers you, when you are getting to the end of your knitting time, stop and examine your work. You can then ease the yarn to the selvages starting at the beginning of the uneven spot and working to the nearest edge. You do this by gently tugging on the yarn until the stitches are even. The yarn will have a "tail" at the selvage. Don't worry about it either. You can work it into the seam.

If you are making something without seams, you would have to do this for every row after you knit that row. It does work, though.

Remember, as you get more and more knitting experience, your tension will even out.
 

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According to what I could find, original "baleen" knitting needles are no longer manufactured....made illegal(more than 20 years ago) with the protection of whales, since true baleen is a form of whale's teeth...(act more like sieves)....also scrimshaw. However, "balene" knitting needles are being manufactured today from a "good quality plastic with points to keep from splitting yarn& providing quiet operation". (their words) But I agree...it would be difficult to guess the age of such a wonderful family heirloom such as your dp needles.
 

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Sorry, the sleeves are being done in the rnd and look find. The body could have been done on straight needles. Besides, when knitting in the round, knitting one rnd and purling the next, then K, then P, alternating rnds results in the Garter stitch. No, this is a tension problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Bingo! In retrospect, this makes good sense to me. As the knit rows are often where the business is done, I can see myself relaxing on the pearl rows.

I thank you for the fix. I can see it clearly. Very well explained.

I will loosen up. Thanks.
:-D
 
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