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Cast required number of sts onto 1 needle.

pattern x amount to needle 1 (do not slip), pattern x amount to needle 2, pattern x amount to needle 3. 1st round worked as a row.

lay out flat from 1 - 3 without twists. Form on flat surface a triangle bringing needles 1 and 3 tog, needle 3 has the working yarn attached, place the point of it into first stitch on needle 1 and pattern pulling working yarn as tightly as possible. Continue around using each empty needle to begin the next section.

Hope this helps . If not Google setting up double-pointed knitting needles it seems to be what everyone else would do. Sorry I am just getting old.


Gracie
 

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Gracie, you are not getting old. You did an excellent job explaining setting up the stitches. One thing not mentioned though, was to keep a close watch on the other end of the needles so the stitches do not fall off. I have cussed quite often with that one; ended up ordering 10 and 13 inches needles from ebay--extremely long but the stitches stay on the needles.You have to be careful not to stab anything- that really hurts.

Also knitting in the round is different than two needle knitting. Instructions can be found on many knitting sites for many pattern stitches.
 

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I do this quite often, so as to avoid "seaming" sleeves. Though longer needles prevent stitches from slipping off, so do point protectors. Using shorter double pointed needles has advantages - less awkward, easier to "collapse" when not working on the project, etc. You will have to mark the beginning of each "round" and pay particular attention to placement of increases/decreases.

It's very easy to lose track of "orientation" and weather an increase/decrease should slant to the right or left. For this purpose the use of a sheet of paper to keep track of rounds, increases, decreases should be used. When I do an increase or decrease, I make note of it with a little arrow pointing either left or right so that on the next decrease/increase round I'm sure to do the same "slant".
 

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If your tension is tight enough, but not too tight, the stitches will stay on the DP needles, but YES, KEEP AN EYE, that you don't accidentally slide them off as you work :oops: No, I've never done that myself....lol
 

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Well worth the (minor) effort, Grandma -- I've found that when I do stockinette back-and-forth, the knit rows and purl rows don't really quite match in tension. Not a problem with circulars or dpn -- I love working with dpns on things like mittens. Quite addictive, and once you get the hang of it, good for traveling projects. I"m about to take the sock plunge :) -- have fun, good luck -- another Grandma
 

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I'd recommend that you try knitting with WOODEN needles in a set of 5--your knitting is on 4 and the 5th one is your extra. I think it's much easier to get an even tension working on 4 needles rather than 3, and metal needles are waaay too slippery for my taste!
 

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I had a really hard time with stitches falling off of the double pointed needles, so I took a cork from a wine bottle and cut it like a loaf of bread into six circles. When I am ready to work on a needle I take of the piece of cork and put it on the back end of the new needle. I haven't had any problems with losing stitches. And its an easy way to store your project without worry also.
 

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It's funny— I think grandmaknit's question was more about how to go about picking up the stitches around the armhole of her sweater than about the annoying habit of stitches to wait for a moment of inattention to escape! Picking those stitches up is different from casting on new ones. I just kind of find the loops and knit into them, but I would love to see how others do it and come out with a nice neat join!
I'm knitting the exact same baby sweater as grandmaknit, and am about an inch away from facing the dreaded pickup chore!

I agree with using the less slippery wooden or bamboo dp needles in sets of five. Using five puts less strain on the stitches. I haven't used anything to block the backs of the needles, but it really would help—I think I'll start using slices of wine corks!
 

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You can also use 2 circular needles instead of double points. I recently began using them and it's an easy technique to learn. I prefer them to double points if for no other reason, they eliminate or almost eliminate the yarn falling off the other end. Like so many other knitting techniques, there are plenty of videos showing how to use two circulars. If you search for "2 circular needles" you should get enough hits to get you going.
If you'd rather use double points, you can use point protectors to block the end. I don't have any unattached erasers but I have plenty of point protectors.
I'm not an expert knitter nor even all that experienced, but the circulars work for me and I am so paranoid about yarn falling off double point needles that I always used point protectors on the ends. When I took a class in sock knitting, the instructor got a good laugh.
 

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For sock knitting I use a single very small circular needle...Just one. Hiya Hiya makes 9" circular needles that are perfect...I only use DPN's when I get down to the toe decreases..works for me..but I'm pretty experienced when it comes to knitting.
 

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I have a very difficult time using small circulars. Anything less than 24 inches is problematic for me. That's why I like using two. I'm almost ready to try a magic loop with one long circular since the technique is essentially the same as with 2 circulars. I'm so happy you are able to use a small circular. You have nimbler finger than I.
 

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Am I reading this thread wrong - or are you all using double-pointed needles to knit in-the-round ONLY? I have a complete set of dp needles in sizes 1,2,3,5,6,8,10 and use them constantly for small projects - knitting BACK and FORTH, not always in a circle. Potholders, face cloths, bibs, baby booties, baby caps, scarves, stocking caps, etc. can all be knit FLAT on dp needles. I have quite a few rubber point protectors, but, in a pinch, I grab a rubber band and wrap it around the end of each dp (like finishing a braid or ponytail).
 

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The main thing to remember about knitting with double pointed needles is that you are only actually knitting with two needles at a time, the others just hang out until you get to them. If you have slippery yan needles combination, you might want to use stoppers on then ends of the needles you are not using at any time. Just move the stoppers as you move from one needle to the next.
 
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