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Here is the thread for any and all tips, big and small, that you have learned along the way that others may well be able to use. I have dyed once and my only tip would be not to forget your gloves....I didn't use mine for just a quick 30 seconds....doesn't wipe off. I am sure you all have many better tips than that so.......next??
 

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As a beginner use Wiltons cake dyes. They're way more cost effective than koolaid and last a long time. You use a smidgeon instead of packets of koolaid to get the same effect.

Certain colours of Koolaid also fade with time whereas Wiltons don't.

Wiltons also have many more colours to choose from and available at stores like JoAnns and Michaels. http://www.dyeyouryarn.com/wilton-formulas.html

Some Wiltons also break giving amazing effects - their black, violet, delphinium blue

http://www.dyeyouryarn.com Will keep you busy for hours. That site and Wiltons got me started

You tube. Check out Chemknits. She dyes with both Wiltons and koolaid.
 

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Thank you for the www.dyeyouryarn.com site information. I had not heard of it before and have quite a bit of handspun yarn that I want to overdye (lots of grays) I am excited to try the various techniques.
 

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I did a project with a knit blank that I painted on the colors then set them then frogged the blank and knit it into socks and my tip is (I came on this because I could not get the job done all in one day) using Jacquards acide dyes that you mix them in a small glass jar then with an eye dropper place dye in small squeeze bottles that are use in silk painting and you have great control of the dye and can do patterns this way, well what I did fined from having the dye mixed up for several days and placed in the fridge to keep it form evaporating was that it thickend on its own and when applied to the yarn blank it soaked in but did not spread. Loved that happy accident.
 

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Several years ago, my Mom and I used brewed tea to change the color of some older crocheted pieces. They were a very light sage green and I wanted ecru, it worked perfectly. I haven't had the time to try it yet, but if you are wanting to 'age' some existing pieces this works well and I want to try to do some yarn as well. Since what we tea dyed were doilies, I can't vouch for the color holding in a wearable piece, so would have to do more reading plus experiment. If any of you have more info on this, I would love to read it.

Thanks so much for starting this new section!! I'm enjoying it - and learning so much.
 

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Cdambro said:
Here is the thread for any and all tips, big and small, that you have learned along the way that others may well be able to use. I have dyed once and my only tip would be not to forget your gloves....I didn't use mine for just a quick 30 seconds....doesn't wipe off. I am sure you all have many better tips than that so.......next??
Soft Scrub does a wonderful job on taking dye off the hands when you've forgotten your gloves. I got turquoise off my hands with it.
 

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sockyarn said:
NEVER dye in your kitchen unless you are using kool-aid or food coloring and always wear a dust mask.
Until very recently I always dyed in my kitchen. I tape off the counters with black bin bags and use dedicated pots and pans for it. I still use my oven for dyeing. In the UK our houses aren't that big and we don't have basements. I know of many successful indie dyers who do all their dyeing in their kitchens.
 

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Fabric and yarn dyes are poisons and are not meant to be used around food or food prep areas. The same goes for using pans, bowls or measuring spoon/cups with dyes. Every thing you use with dyes should be ONLY for dyes and never for food.
Cdambro said:
Could I ask why? Did you have a major dye spill?
 

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If I had just scanned these posts (which I've noted many on KP do - you can tell when they ask a question that's been answered a dozen times in the pages of postings) and not done my research before dying my yarn, I would have been petrified to try it. Everyone should know that there are safe ways to dye yarn in your kitchen in any old pot and pan you choose - if it's edible, don't be scared of being in your kitchen with it to dye your yarn: food color, Kool-Aid or Wiltons with white vinegar and water. The dyes that can cause health problems (I've not been interested in learning about them since I don't plan to try it and will leave it to the yarn companies and pros) should certainly be used away from where any food preparation takes place in special pots and with special utensils. Please don't take this as confrontational - just explanatory that food products used for dying are safe to use in your kitchen. Now if you spill the pot of yarn you are dying on your white countertop - ooops - that stains! I do remember that from the Kool-Aid days when my son was young!
 
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