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I remember years ago being taught to use an edge stitch - both ends. Now that stitch is not mentioned anymore. Am I correct in thinking that I need to add two stitches to an existing pattern?
Thank you - KarinStr
 

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That all depends ... on your pattern and its shaping. I was taught to work a chain selvedge by slippng the first stitch purl-wise, pass the yarn between the needle tips to continue knitting, and knit the last stitch, or the opposite if the next stitch is a purl (to avoid a loopy edge stitch). That selvedge stitch is very narrow, because it's viewed edge on. So, I usually add two or four stitches to whatever I'm knitting. If it's a fitted garment, fewer or none may be better. If there's a hard and fast rule, I don't know of it. I go by trial and error.
No, that edge stitch/selvedge stitch does not seem to be taught as a normal part of knitting today. I don't know why. A chain edge is so much easier to seam up than searching for those elusive 'bumps'! In the case of a blanket or such flat piece, it just looks neater.
 

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Jessica-Jean said:
That all depends ... on your pattern and its shaping. I was taught to work a chain selvedge by slippng the first stitch purl-wise, pass the yarn between the needle tips to continue knitting, and knit the last stitch, or the opposite if the next stitch is a purl (to avoid a loopy edge stitch). That selvedge stitch is very narrow, because it's viewed edge on. So, I usually add two or four stitches to whatever I'm knitting. If it's a fitted garment, fewer or none may be better. If there's a hard and fast rule, I don't know of it. I go by trial and error.
No, that edge stitch/selvedge stitch does not seem to be taught as a normal part of knitting today. I don't know why. A chain edge is so much easier to seam up than searching for those elusive 'bumps'! In the case of a blanket or such flat piece, it just looks neater.
Jessica-Jean - Don't know if you know how much I and I'm thinking most on this Forum love to see your posts. I always know that I am getting the CORRECT advice on how to do things. It's great. You also tell the reasoning behind what you do.

Did you ever think of writing a book? Let us know if you do.

Like your quote at the bottom also.

Have a very good day.

:D
 

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I only learned about the addition of selvedge stitches to an existing pattern from a Mon Tricot 800 Stitches stitch dictionary. I was 24.

My grandmother didn't know anything about pattern stitches other than a basic 2x2 ribbing, but she taught me always to slip the first stitch purl-wise and knit the last stitch on every row. She didn't know any other way.

We are so lucky to have the Internet and the ability to learn so many other techniques!
 

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Most patterns don't mention an edge stitch, but they are included in the pattern. I also usually slip the first stitch. (I used to say always, but have learned it doesn't work well when knitting a diamond shape, not enough give in the edge for some reason.) If I am altering a pattern from a front & back to in the round, I remove the first & last stitch, since they would be in the seam and there is now no seam.
 

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knitterbee said:
Most patterns don't mention an edge stitch, but they are included in the pattern. I also usually slip the first stitch. (I used to say always, but have learned it doesn't work well when knitting a diamond shape, not enough give in the edge for some reason.) ...
No, the chain selvedge doesn't work on the diagonal. If you study it a bit, it's easy to see why. Usually, that stitch has to cover for two rows of knitting; it works. On the diagonal, it has to cover for those two rows plus the distance across from the bottom of two rows to the top of a stitch further away from the actual edge. I haven't found a way to make it work, though there may be one. Since the things I knit on the diagonal are scarves, there's no great need for a smooth chain slevedge.

However, it does work on the usual corner-to-corner dishcloth pattern, but there's a reason for that too. The chain selvedge is NOT on the diagonal in relation to the few stitches of border outside the yarn-overs, so it's not stretching across anything.

Makes sense? or clear as mud?
 

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KarinStr said:
MUD but I will muddle thru it :)
Sorry! :oops: Swatching will probably show you better than I can explain in words. There are possibly YouTube videos that could help.
 

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I learned about it not working on diagonals while knitting an afghan for my son. When I sewed the diamonds together, it didn't want to lay flat. I figured out what I was doing wrong about a third of the way through the afghan (big enough for 6' 4" son to wrap up in head to toe) and didn't want to take it out to fix it. It won't lay flat and that bothers me, but son doesn't care. Since he doesn't spread it out flat on his bed, I don't see the problem and can live with it.
Jessica-Jean said:
knitterbee said:
Most patterns don't mention an edge stitch, but they are included in the pattern. I also usually slip the first stitch. (I used to say always, but have learned it doesn't work well when knitting a diamond shape, not enough give in the edge for some reason.) ...
No, the chain selvedge doesn't work on the diagonal. If you study it a bit, it's easy to see why. Usually, that stitch has to cover for two rows of knitting; it works. On the diagonal, it has to cover for those two rows plus the distance across from the bottom of two rows to the top of a stitch further away from the actual edge. I haven't found a way to make it work, though there may be one. Since the things I knit on the diagonal are scarves, there's no great need for a smooth chain slevedge.

However, it does work on the usual corner-to-corner dishcloth pattern, but there's a reason for that too. The chain selvedge is NOT on the diagonal in relation to the few stitches of border outside the yarn-overs, so it's not stretching across anything.

Makes sense? or clear as mud?
 

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Jessica-Jean, I am knitting a pair of socks and on the heel I tried the technique you described. I slipped the first stitch purlwise, then moved the yarn to the back to knit the rest of the row. I ended up with little "nubs" on the ends of the row. Was is supposed to look like that or did I do something wrong?
 

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BEChristianson said:
Jessica-Jean, I am knitting a pair of socks and on the heel I tried the technique you described. I slipped the first stitch purlwise, then moved the yarn to the back to knit the rest of the row. I ended up with little "nubs" on the ends of the row. Was is supposed to look like that or did I do something wrong?
I have knit a total of two pairs of socks in my life, and those were toddler-sized. So, I do know how to knit socks, but I am not an expert sock knitter. I suggest you post this question as a new topic, perhaps with a reference back to this topic or a quote from here if that helps. Sorry. I am unqualified to help!
 

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Maybe, but my real question is about the edge. If I did this on something else I'd have the same result. I'm wondering if I did it to tightly. I should have taken a picture of it. Maybe I'll try a swatch and then post as a new topic like you suggest. Thanks anyway.
 

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BEChristianson said:
Jessica-Jean, I am knitting a pair of socks and on the heel I tried the technique you described. I slipped the first stitch purlwise, then moved the yarn to the back to knit the rest of the row. I ended up with little "nubs" on the ends of the row. Was is supposed to look like that or did I do something wrong?
Oops! I missed seeing that mention of "little nubs" ... My guess is that you slipped the stitch purlwise, but then you did NOT pass the yarn between the needle tips to the back before continuing. If instead you took it around to the back, that would make "little nubs" along the edge. Sorry I didn't spot that on first reading.
 

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I get it. I will have to pay more attention on the 2nd sock to see what I did. I'll probably end up ripping out the 1st one anyway because I don't like how it looks. That's the one thing I've learned over the years, don't settle. If you don't like it, you won't wear it. Thanks again for the help.
 

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knitterbee said:
I learned about it not working on diagonals while knitting an afghan for my son. When I sewed the diamonds together, it didn't want to lay flat. I figured out what I was doing wrong about a third of the way through the afghan (big enough for 6' 4" son to wrap up in head to toe) and didn't want to take it out to fix it. It won't lay flat and that bothers me, but son doesn't care. Since he doesn't spread it out flat on his bed, I don't see the problem and can live with it.
Jessica-Jean said:
knitterbee said:
Most patterns don't mention an edge stitch, but they are included in the pattern. I also usually slip the first stitch. (I used to say always, but have learned it doesn't work well when knitting a diamond shape, not enough give in the edge for some reason.) ...
No, the chain selvedge doesn't work on the diagonal. If you study it a bit, it's easy to see why. Usually, that stitch has to cover for two rows of knitting; it works. On the diagonal, it has to cover for those two rows plus the distance across from the bottom of two rows to the top of a stitch further away from the actual edge. I haven't found a way to make it work, though there may be one. Since the things I knit on the diagonal are scarves, there's no great need for a smooth chain slevedge.

However, it does work on the usual corner-to-corner dishcloth pattern, but there's a reason for that too. The chain selvedge is NOT on the diagonal in relation to the few stitches of border outside the yarn-overs, so it's not stretching across anything.

Makes sense? or clear as mud?
I had the same problem with the first blankie I made---a Harlequin affair of diamonds to sew together. It taught me I want my blankies in one piece because I hate sewing together. I finally CROCHETED the diamonds together, adding stitches in an attempt to make it lay flat. It was somewhat successful and kept my son warm; but it was no heirloom piece!
 
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