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I am knitting a square of stocking stitch for a baby blanket, to be edged by hand or machine. Problem is, the fabric keeps getting caught behind the gate posts--which is a most annoying problem. In addition to claw weights, i added my cast on comb like a weight, and after a few rows I *think* I see it helping, but I'm not holding my breath. This has happened on some tuck patterns, too. The machine is an SK 860, recently cleaned and carriage and machine professionally looked at, plus new sponge bar. Any ideas? Did I just need more weights? What other kind of weights should I invest in, just out of curiousity?

Thanks,

Jamie in WA
 

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I just had that same thing happen a few times in one day! Of course I didn't notice it for several rows! Aaarrrgggghhh! I am very good at "unknitting"! I will be interested in the answer to this problem :x
 

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You definitely need a lot more weight on Tuck stitch than you do any other, you also may need to have your tuck brushes on.
I find it strange that people always seem to need so much more weight on their knitting machines than I seem to do. On some knitting I never even bother with weights. I don't know whether I need less weight because I always use industrial yarn or because I always tend to use a small stitch size.
I would try more weight but also try going down in stitch size, if the stitch is too large on the needle I think this can cause this problem. Also check that the yarn is in the mast correctly and that there is some pull back when you pull on it. The tension wire should arch over when the yarn is in the sinker plate. Often problems are more related to the yarn in use and the settings that you have on the carriage and the mast. It's nice that the carriage slides over the knitting with great ease, but the machine never seems to knit well without you having to push the carriage. Hope that you can understand what I mean.
 

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I use the 16 oz. fishing sinkers attached to a fork when knitting the heel of socks. You take an old fork or buy inexpensive ones from the dollar store, bend the teeth, make a hole on the handle to attach the weight. It's easy then to hang it through the bent teeth. I needed more but couldn't find the weights. So I put bibi gun pellets in an old sock. Do this to the weight desired, and tie them to your fork. These "weights" can be used on both, flat bed and circular sock knitting m machines (CSM). I learned this from You Tube and from a CSM knitting group. I'll post photos, if you like.

Thanks
Moritta

PS to avoid handling the sinkers which are made of lead, you can cover them with some of that rubberized liquid that you can find at craft stores by dipping them in it.
 

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susieknitter said:
You definitely need a lot more weight on Tuck stitch than you do any other, you also may need to have your tuck brushes on.
I find it strange that people always seem to need so much more weight on their knitting machines than I seem to do. On some knitting I never even bother with weights. I don't know whether I need less weight because I always use industrial yarn or because I always tend to use a small stitch size.
I would try more weight but also try going down in stitch size, if the stitch is too large on the needle I think this can cause this problem. Also check that the yarn is in the mast correctly and that there is some pull back when you pull on it. The tension wire should arch over when the yarn is in the sinker plate. Often problems are more related to the yarn in use and the settings that you have on the carriage and the mast. It's nice that the carriage slides over the knitting with great ease, but the machine never seems to knit well without you having to push the carriage. Hope that you can understand what I mean.
Very new to machine knitting, and I'm intrigued by this.

Where do you get industrial yarn? How is it different from yarn you buy at a LYS or an online site like knitpicks.com?
 

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If it spans the entire or almost the entire bed, I use my ribber cast on comb and hang two big ribber weights. I have some metal spring clamps. If you pull the plastic sheathing from one side of the "handle" there is usually a hole that you can hang the weight on. Then I just roll up the knitting on the comb as I knit along, put the spring clamp onto it holding the knitting (an old yard stick helps and keeps the fabric from getting stretched too much from the weight) It works quite well and then the knitting won't jump the gate pegs.

I do this also when I'm doing a large afghan and using the ribber. Once the weights hit the floor what do you do? You have to have the weight on it (I always use a double bed and tuck for afghans, makes them puff out) so rolling up and hanging the weights onto the spring clamps is the only thing you're able to do.

I'm not knitting at the moment so please don't ask for pictures. With the holidays fast approaching I won't be knitting until after New Years.
 

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A couple of months ago I figured out how to make a really nice and easy to do and works great "Fabric Roll Up" I call it using PVC pipe and a Bungee cord. For under $10 you can make a few in different sizes to meet your needs.
I can't figure out how to put it here, but if you send me a PM with your e-mail address I would be happy to send it to you.

eBay always has weights for sale for KM.
 

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Double check your gate pegs and make sure they are in alignment. Sometimes they can get bent. Also with your machine a lot of weight is not needed. Studio/Silver Reed machines were made not to use a lot of weight. You do however need to add extra weight with tuck stitch. You do not need extra weight with stockinette. If you stitch is too tight, it may not knit properly. Check you tension dial or the tension dial at the antenna. You may want to tighten your antenna tension. Just keep in mind that the antenna tension affects your rows.
 

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Fairly new to knitting machines but when teaching my 11 yr. old granddaughter to use I found this happened to her whenever she started moving the carriage too fast if she hadn't brought her end weights up often enough.
 

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Spellcheck said:
susieknitter said:
You definitely need a lot more weight on Tuck stitch than you do any other, you also may need to have your tuck brushes on.
I find it strange that people always seem to need so much more weight on their knitting machines than I seem to do. On some knitting I never even bother with weights. I don't know whether I need less weight because I always use industrial yarn or because I always tend to use a small stitch size.
I would try more weight but also try going down in stitch size, if the stitch is too large on the needle I think this can cause this problem. Also check that the yarn is in the mast correctly and that there is some pull back when you pull on it. The tension wire should arch over when the yarn is in the sinker plate. Often problems are more related to the yarn in use and the settings that you have on the carriage and the mast. It's nice that the carriage slides over the knitting with great ease, but the machine never seems to knit well without you having to push the carriage. Hope that you can understand what I mean.
Very new to machine knitting, and I'm intrigued by this.

Where do you get industrial yarn? How is it different from yarn you buy at a LYS or an online site like knitpicks.com?
I don't know where you would get industrial yarn from in America. It is the yarn that is used by knitwear company's and is probably end of line yarns that they have no more use for. It's on large cones and is very fine, usually 2/28 or 2/30. You need to put 2, 3 or 4 strands together to use it. This may seem a problem, but because it is made to go through big knitting looms it is highly waxed and therefore it seems better than the cones of yarn that are sold for domestic machines. I very rarely use any other yarn.
 

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Spellcheck said:
Pictures! We want pictures! :)
If you follow the links I posted earlier (3rd post), there are plenty of photos there.

susieknitter said:
I find it strange that people always seem to need so much more weight on their knitting machines than I seem to do. On some knitting I never even bother with weights. I don't know whether I need less weight because I always use industrial yarn or because I always tend to use a small stitch size.
The reason I use more weights than the usual is because I remove the pair of brushes under the sinker plate of the carriage. On the Brother KM, these 2 brushes under the carriage are used to keep the fabric down and prevent the stitches from either dropping or get caught on the pegs. Since I removed them, I compensate the purpose of these brushes by using weight.

I prefer not to use them because they tend to catch on certain yarns. Someone suggested to use replace these brush wheels with rubber wheels. It's on my purchasing list.

Another reason why I use more weights is when I use heavier yarns the weight keeps the stitches down and knit more evenly.

I later found out that many machine knitters in my group have been leaving those brush wheels out too. What works for us may not for others. It's all up to the individual and her/his knitting machine.

As for industrial yarns, in the US, DBNY carries them at times. The cone is larger and taller.
http://www.discontinuedbrandnameyarn.com/shop/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=3065
 

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I have just counted up, and I have had and used 14 different models/makes of knitting machines. With every one I have never had trouble regarding weights or the use of weights, I must be a very lucky lady. :thumbup: Perhaps every thing will go pear shaped now I have said this, but hopefully not.
 

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susieknitter said:
Spellcheck said:
susieknitter said:
You definitely need a lot more weight on Tuck stitch than you do any other, you also may need to have your tuck brushes on.
I find it strange that people always seem to need so much more weight on their knitting machines than I seem to do. On some knitting I never even bother with weights. I don't know whether I need less weight because I always use industrial yarn or because I always tend to use a small stitch size.
I would try more weight but also try going down in stitch size, if the stitch is too large on the needle I think this can cause this problem. Also check that the yarn is in the mast correctly and that there is some pull back when you pull on it. The tension wire should arch over when the yarn is in the sinker plate. Often problems are more related to the yarn in use and the settings that you have on the carriage and the mast. It's nice that the carriage slides over the knitting with great ease, but the machine never seems to knit well without you having to push the carriage. Hope that you can understand what I mean.
Very new to machine knitting, and I'm intrigued by this.

Where do you get industrial yarn? How is it different from yarn you buy at a LYS or an online site like knitpicks.com?
I don't know where you would get industrial yarn from in America. It is the yarn that is used by knitwear company's and is probably end of line yarns that they have no more use for. It's on large cones and is very fine, usually 2/28 or 2/30. You need to put 2, 3 or 4 strands together to use it. This may seem a problem, but because it is made to go through big knitting looms it is highly waxed and therefore it seems better than the cones of yarn that are sold for domestic machines. I very rarely use any other yarn.
If you are using cone yarns in the US, then you are using yarns especially wound for machine knitters. Usually hand knitters use skein yarns. Machine yarns on cones can run as above 2/24, 2/30, 2/12, 3/12, 3/15 etc. It depends on the manufacturer. The yarn is plied to make different yarn weights. Several single plies (the front number) the ply of the yarn. The weight (second number) is determined by the second number. A 24 weight is thinner than a 12 weight, a 30 weight is thinner than a 24 weight, etc. Again most coned yarns are machine knitting yarns. Also most of them have been waxed to run through the machines, that's why most of them work more easily through the machines than skein yarns.

As far as I know, Newtons is the only company that is an exception regarding skein yarns. They wax the skeins as well as the cones, because they know they may be used by machine knitters and well as hand knitters. The wax will dissolve with washing or cleaning.
 
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