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I know you KPers can help me. I want to do a fair isle design but not to carry the floats across. Does any one know how you carry two yarns across each row - wrapping the yarn round or over each stitch as you go - particularly the purl row?
 

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It is possible to twist the yarn on every stitch but I think it would result in a thick, inelastic fabric much more like weaving than like knitting and would be very tedious to do. Why are you considering this?
 

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I bring the working thread over the floats, no matter how many there are. Makes it easy to find the next color as you need it because it is handy. Securing the floats after every 3, 4 or even 5 stitches will make it smoother on the back and at the end of each row check for areas too loose or too tight. Now is the time to adjust the threads. I learned much from Elizabeth Zimmermann's book. She prefers holding one color in each hand and working with them as they are needed. Experiment on some scrap yarn following a chart till you find the method that works well for you. She does not advocate wrapping the yarn around each other as many books tell you. If you have a chance to see her book, Knitting Without Tears, the explanation in in chapter 3, pg 50.
 

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Perhaps you mean intarsia instead of fairisle. A true fairisle design only uses 2 colors per row and doesn't have floats longer than 4 stitches. For intarsia, you use an individual ball or bobbin of yarn for each color change, so you don't carry any yarn floats across.
 

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I do it like Carol J - one color in each hand, doing Continental on one hand and American on the other. Fergablu2 may have it right - and I never carry it a many as 4 stitches across - the long floats bother me
 

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To be authentic Fair Isle you will work with only 2 yarns at one time. In case people don't know, the Fair Isles are off the coast of Scotland. It's like Guernsey or Jersey they are islands of the coast of France and south England, they belong to England. The Aran isles are off the coast of Ireland. Icelandic sweaters are from Iceland. So any knitting named as such are from those islands made to be warm when fishing, and the designs belong to a certain family. So if a fisherman drowns he can be identified from the pattern in his sweater.
 

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workwidow said:
I know you KPers can help me. I want to do a fair isle design but not to carry the floats across. Does any one know how you carry two yarns across each row - wrapping the yarn round or over each stitch as you go - particularly the purl row?
I never carry floats on the back of my work - when I did so, a long time ago, I always had problems with the floats catching rings, pendants, buttons, etc.
I now catch the second (and third) colours in the back of the knitting. Just the other day, I posted a photo of what the back of my work looks like, when done with two colours:
See: http://www.knittingparadise.com/t-417572-5.html#9506374

There are some YouTube videos showing how to use multiple colours, it seems that every knitter uses a different method, so my suggestion is that you spend some time at YouTube, search for "knitting with 3 colours" or something similar (even slightly different search terms will bring up different videos).
 

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Philosophers wool has a video on what you are wanting to do. I tried to bring it up and for some reason can't. Don't know if their site is down or if it is just my computer. Look for Philosopherswool.com and a video on knitting with both hands two colors.
 

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Doriseve said:
To be authentic Fair Isle you will work with only 2 yarns at one time. In case people don't know, the Fair Isles are off the coast of Scotland. It's like Guernsey or Jersey they are islands of the coast of France and south England, they belong to England. The Aran isles are off the coast of Ireland. Icelandic sweaters are from Iceland. So any knitting named as such are from those islands made to be warm when fishing, and the designs belong to a certain family. So if a fisherman drowns he can be identified from the pattern in his sweater.
Actually the story that designs identify fishermen if they drown is a myth. Alice Starmore did extensive research on Aran knitting and its origins. You might want to see her book, "Aran Knitting" (expanded edition), published in 2010, page 24.

Fair Isle knitting traditionally was knit in the round, with steeks. There were no purl rows. The knitter usually knits with both hands, or with both colors in the same hand. This method automatically catches the strand from the color being carried. Traditional designs do not have long floats.

Alice Starmore also wrote a book on Fair Isle design and technique. Elizabeth Zimmerman wrote about the steeking method for Fair Isle knitting also. The Philosopher's Wool website has a nice tutorial about how to catch the alternate yarn color.

Using the twined knitting method does catch the yarn in each stitch, and does not result in a stiff fabric if done properly.
 

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Debiknit said:
Philosophers wool has a video on what you are wanting to do. I tried to bring it up and for some reason can't. Don't know if their site is down or if it is just my computer. Look for Philosopherswool.com and a video on knitting with both hands two colors.
I couldn't get it, either. There was a phone number, but I didn't try it yet.
There are You Tube tutorials that use their technique, but have directions for knitting the purl side as well. Traditional Fair Isle was done in the round, there were no purl rows. But for those people who are a bit reluctant to do steeks, I suppose this would work for the purl side.
 

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I think what might useful for this would be mosaic knitting. It uses 2 colors but you never knit with more than in a row; the color not in use is slipped. It makes a nice warm fabric too. I recommend mosaic knitting as a first project for someone who is new to colorwork knitting. There are many many mosaic knitting patterns out there. :sm20:

Also if you pick a small pattern peerie [ patterns in between larger figure rows in fair isle ] or a dense pattern where you don't go more than 3 stitches without changing colors you don't have to do anything special with the floats. Using color changing yarn will also give the color of intricate colorwork without the labor!

Here is a link to some hats I with these techniques. http://www.knittingparadise.com/t-4730-1.html
 

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Debiknit said:
Their site may be temporarily down. If you can find the video showing how to do this, it isn't hard. If I can find it I will try to post it for you.
Debi, I tried calling the phone number on the Philosophers Wool website. It was answered by a lady who is not part of the PW business, but just answers the phone, who told me that the site is still active, the business is still open, and she said she would contact the owner and let them know. I mentioned that others had the same problem getting on the site.
 
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