Knitting and Crochet Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the middle of my first ever project and the yarn that I am using had a big knot in it so I untied it and the yarn had apparently been two pieces. Should I just tie it back together or what? How do I add the new part on if I don't tie it back together?
I am having trouble figuring out how to do this.
Thanks, Kim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
it depends if your yarn is wool or some other fiber. Anything but wool I usually work the 2 ends overlapping each other for a few up to several inches and then work the loose ends in later. So. you knit until the last say 8 inches of the first yarn, add the loose end of the second yarn and knit several stitches with both and then drop the old one and just knit with the new one. If your yarn is slippery I would knit more stitches with both ends.

You Tube has multiple knitting and crocheting videos available for free. You can also google search for knitting techniques - free videos and web site tutorials.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,389 Posts
Splicing yarn..well it depends on the yarn. Sometimes I use a "spit splice" and sometimes I use a "russian splice" it depends on the yarn and the item being knitted.

I'm an "old time" knitter..with over 40 years on the needles...yarn companies have changed how they splice yarn during that time span. Sometimes you have to "sacrifice" a few yards for a "smooth" transition..and other times you can short cut.

This is a true and odd story...after years of being estranged..my sister and I reconnected a few years before her death. We both belonged to an on line knitting community but didnt know it. someone asked about splicing yarn and when I explained a "Russian Splice"..my sister knew it was me! We had a few short years before she died. She never was able to perfect a splice but she sure loved to knit!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,116 Posts
((((((( This pretty much goes with knitting or crocheting:

No knots! LOL!! I tell ya, though only a judge could find a knot! LOL!!

Cut out the bad section of yarn leaving a six inch tail on your needle/hook (to weave in later or knit/crochet in as you go).

If crocheting, finish stitch up to the last step then just lay your yarn over the hook, short piece of yarn to the back and finish the stitch - Do this for yarn color change and, adding another skein of yarn, too.

If knitting. enter stitch then lay on the new piece or yarn - short tail to the back and inbetween the needes - finish stitch with long tail.
****** Note; Sometimes skeins can just be ratty and this might happen to you again. As you work, pull out five feet or so and examine for no breakage. Continue the same. Pulling back crochet is easy but tinking your knitting is a bit annoying. LOL!!

Donna Rae
Brandon, Iowa ))))

mammakim said:
I am in the middle of my first ever project and the yarn that I am using had a big knot in it so I untied it and the yarn had apparently been two pieces. Should I just tie it back together or what? How do I add the new part on if I don't tie it back together?
I am having trouble figuring out how to do this.
Thanks, Kim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all your replies. It is much appreciated, for someone who is new and does not have anyone really close by to help out when I get stuck it is so nice to be able to come on here and get help.
Courier, While I am sorry to hear that your sister passed away it is great that you were able to connect again and through knitting too which you both love is just wonderful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,389 Posts
ibe try this: google "russian yarn splice" or "russian splice", you should get some results that will show you how to do this, it's sort of difficult to explain. It works just great.

Mammakim, that my sister realized who I was when I described the splice is what really got me!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Some people overlap the two ends(at least 3") and knit them in to the needles as normal, making a double thickness spot, however. If it is a project with texture, then I knot the yarns against the needle leaving a "tail"
of 3 or 4" to be woven later with a tapestry needle. This is the easiest and less worrisome. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I've done all the various methods; but then someone suggested I just run one yarn end up the middle of the twist of the other one. So I did it using about 8" of the two yarns so I had plenty of yarn to work with. Just let it bunch up on the tapestry needle as you run it in, then hold onto the needle and gently work the outer yarn down over the inner one, pull out the needle, trim any end hanging out and tug the two yarns a little to snug together. Works great, no unsightly ends, not as bulky as holding two together, etc. I've done dozens of projects using this and no problems, so it's my new favorite method. Hope this gives yet another option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,389 Posts
It's basically the same technique so yes it is still considered a russian splice. A full splice involves doing both ends..but it still qualifies.

A full Russian splice can withstand the most rigorous of "wear" and withstand many washings. Is it a pain to do...well I suppose it is.

My mother and I knitted many things for my son when he was born 36 years ago. I hung onto those items...and they were passed to his daughter (who is now 5). A testament to the durability of a full Russian Splice.

To answer your question, yes the splice you are doing does fall under the category of Russian Splice.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top Bottom