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I knit a lot of kids sweaters and am still searching for a good method for buttonholes. I would like it to hold its shape and not stretch. Just tried a new method but it's worked over 4 stitches (k2tog, yo twice,ssk on the right side ad on wrong side k the first anchor stitch, k first yo, p 2nd yo, k last base stitch BUT this buttonhole is always too big. Any suggestions?
 

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choose buttons AFTER buttonholes are made....or....knit one fewer st in the beg of buttonhole...either should work...

i like the buttonholes included in the seam of a 'bound' edge...like a rolled st st 'binding' or a 3 st i-cord 'binding' , either case you get to the marked buttonhole area, cast on the number of sts needed to open for your button, then go back to the orig 'binding' method...when finished, turn back the sweater side of the buttonhole and tack down...turn binding side into itself and also tack down...you are really just leaving a slit in the 'seam' of the 'binding'....

i originally saw this suggested for those little baby sweaters that are so nice to keep on hand when you have a bit of leftover yarn to use up.....keep the colors unisex and make the buttonholes in the same place on both sides of the sweater...then when the next baby comes along, you sew the buttons over the 'wrong' buttonholes and use the 'right' ones, depending on the baby's gender...i have really enjoyed this as I usually have so many things going that i can't get a baby sweater done in time for the baby to wear it if i wait till the baby's here...
 

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(((((( This video is over three stitches and shows how to reinforce it, also in the process, done on one row and by turning, I believe.

As you have an extra stitch, you don't want to change the pattern by losing a stitch and reinforcing your present one still leaves it too big. If you can revise using a 3-stitch button hole, it will be smaller of course.

******* Or use a larger button??

For button holes already made in a FO that have stretched, I use a matching color sewing thread and double it to stitch on both sides to make them smaller.

Sometime, I find botton holes not big enough, too but they have plenty of reinforcment that allows me to cut them bigger then I reinforce that area with matching color sewing thread.

Good luck~
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dafancynancy62 said:
I knit a lot of kids sweaters and am still searching for a good method for buttonholes. I would like it to hold its shape and not stretch. Just tried a new method but it's worked over 4 stitches (k2tog, yo twice,ssk on the right side ad on wrong side k the first anchor stitch, k first yo, p 2nd yo, k last base stitch BUT this buttonhole is always too big. Any suggestions?
 

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I recently tried that buttonhole (Tulip buttonhole with Eunnny) for a baby sweater. I made it over 3 sts and it did not turn out so great. I think I will try the one posted previously by e.riden next time. It looks simple enough and easy for a baby sweater. For a child's or adult sweater I think the tulip buttonhole would be very strong.
 

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from http://www.knittingtipsbyjudy.com/more%20tips2.html
Method 2. For me this is the best buttonhole.
Knit to the point where the buttonhole will be placed.
Slip the first stitch on the left needle as if knit.
Move the yarn to the front of the work and leave it there. Slip the next stitch from the left needle to the right needle as if to knit. Pass the first slipped stitch over the second slipped stitch and off the needle. Repeat until you've bound off the number of required stitches for the buttonhole.
Slip the last stitch from the right needle back to the left needle. Turn the work. Bring the yarn to the front of the work. At the edge where the buttonhole was begun, cast on the number of stitches you bound off plus one additional stitch.
Turn the work again. Slip the first stitch from the left needle to the right needle as if to knit. Pass the extra cast on stitch over the next stitch; then slip this stitch back to the left needle. Continue knitting the row.
 
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