Knitting and Crochet Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
662 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hubby had knee replacement surgery 2 days ago and due home sunday.anyone got any hints or help for me to handle this.he will be on crutches.my main concern is he was extremely grumpy and irritable before due to pain so what can I expect now ??? :sm11: :sm11:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30,096 Posts
chrissyh said:
hubby had knee replacement surgery 2 days ago and due home sunday.anyone got any hints or help for me to handle this.he will be on crutches.my main concern is he was extremely grumpy and irritable before due to pain so what can I expect now ??? :sm11: :sm11:
Possibly more grumpiness due to the new pain (I have had both knees done), or possibly a nice, mellow disposition from his pain meds.

Crutches seem a bit odd for knee replacement, though, unless it's for later on. But I had to keep my leg straight and iced up in between physical therapy sessions for the first few days, then went to a walker and after that, a cane.

The physical therapy is just as important as the surgery itself. I can't stress that enough!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
496 Posts
Be helpful but don't hover over him, just allow him some space. My husband was happy to have my help, but he really wanted to be left alone a lot. Since I was a nurse I had a tendency to constantly try to fix things with constant questions about how he felt and what he needed, I found it was better to let him do the asking. I guess my suggestion is just to be patient. Good luck and I hope your husband gets relief from his pain. There will be lots of physical therapy and post op pain, but my husband was glad he had the surgery. Anxious to hear how things go for you guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,986 Posts
I think it depends on his level of pain tolerance. Some bear it better than others; in my case, Steve is EXTREMELY reluctant to admit anything hurts, so I had to watch out for him over-doing (which he didn't). I figure it hurt some, because he did take pain medication every so often, which is rare. That said, it is major surgery, so...

He also had to keep his leg straight and use ice.

He used 2 crutches for a time, then a walker, and then beginning to walk. Finally walking just fine and no pain. :))

All in all, it was not a very traumatic situation for either of us. He had a full knee replacement. He did go to a rehab clinic for several weeks. He said they were trying to kill him. But he kept going back.

They gave him rehab exercises to do at home as well, which he did faithfully. I was also snagged for assistance, and the one thing I remember VIVIDLY is having to put my hands on his thigh and calf and press down pretty darn hard. He said it didn't hurt but it gave me goosebumps.

He was delighted with the results of his surgery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
If there r stairs to get in the house, make sure PT/OT people have him confident in maneuvering them. He should go home with a device that "chills" his knee to keep down swelling and lessen pain. Be sure you know how to use it. The doctor will arrange either home or outpatient physical therapy....don't let him talk u out of it. Pain medicine, his recliner and his bed at home will help, too. Two months post-open, he'll be happy he had it done. Walk outside with him when u can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30,096 Posts
Stephhy said:
I think it depends on his level of pain tolerance. Some bear it better than others; in my case, Steve is EXTREMELY reluctant to admit anything hurts, so I had to watch out for him over-doing (which he didn't). I figure it hurt some, because he did take pain medication every so often, which is rare. That said, it is major surgery, so...

He also had to keep his leg straight and use ice.

He used 2 crutches for a time, then a walker, and then beginning to walk. Finally walking just fine and no pain. :))

All in all, it was not a very traumatic situation for either of us. He had a full knee replacement. He did go to a rehab clinic for several weeks. He said they were trying to kill him. But he kept going back.

They gave him rehab exercises to do at home as well, which he did faithfully. I was also snagged for assistance, and the one thing I remember VIVIDLY is having to put my hands on his thigh and calf and press down pretty darn hard. He said it didn't hurt but it gave me goosebumps.

He was delighted with the results of his surgery.
Thanks for including the part about crutches. I guess surgeons differ somewhat in their instructions. The result is the most important thing. ☺
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30,096 Posts
camz1gma said:
If there r stairs to get in the house, make sure PT/OT people have him confident in maneuvering them. He should go home with a device that "chills" his knee to keep down swelling and lessen pain. Be sure you know how to use it. The doctor will arrange either home or outpatient physical therapy....don't let him talk u out of it. Pain medicine, his recliner and his bed at home will help, too. Two months post-open, he'll be happy he had it done. Walk outside with him when u can.
My physical therapist told me not to use a recliner. I don't remember why, though. Maybe others can comment on that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
I agree, the physical therapy is the MOST important part of the recovery. I went thru this surgery and I don't think I did enough, and I'm paying
for it now. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,427 Posts
chrissyh said:
hubby had knee replacement surgery 2 days ago and due home sunday.anyone got any hints or help for me to handle this.he will be on crutches.my main concern is he was extremely grumpy and irritable before due to pain so what can I expect now ??? :sm11: :sm11:
I have had both knees replaced (left Dec. 2008, right Mar. 2015). I didn't use crutches, came home using a walker with wheels on the front and "skis" on the back and then graduated to a cane, then nothing. Make sure he keeps it elevated, uses ice for the swelling and does his exercises. Also, I had a commode to put over the toilet the first time and this time used a versa frame. It makes it easier to get on and off the toilet. We rented the walker, commode and borrowed the versa frame the second time even though we had a comfort height toilet. Also, make sure he gets lots of fibre to keep him "regular". lol Remember ice, ice and more ice! It won't take too long till he's walking with no pain! If you have any questions pm me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30,096 Posts
BonnieP said:
I have had both knees replaced (left Dec. 2008, right Mar. 2015). I didn't use crutches, came home using a walker with wheels on the front and "skis" on the back and then graduated to a cane, then nothing. Make sure he keeps it elevated, uses ice for the swelling and does his exercises. Also, I had a commode to put over the toilet the first time and this time used a versa frame. It makes it easier to get on and off the toilet. We rented the walker, commode and borrowed the versa frame the second time even though we had a comfort height toilet. Also, make sure he gets lots of fibre to keep him "regular". lol Remember ice, ice and more ice! It won't take too long till he's walking with no pain! If you have any questions pm me.
Yes, fiber is important! Many painkillers are opioids, and they will just stop you right up! Laxatives are not a good idea, but a stool softener can be helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,102 Posts
Make sure he takes his pain meds on schedule, before he starts to hurt. Keep lots of big ice packs at the ready, they help the pain more than anything else! (I speak from experience, had both of mine replaced last year.) Keep feet elevated while he is sitting. Do not let him sit more than an hour without getting up and walking about, to PREVENT BLOOD CLOTS! If you can, rent a rolling walker, it will be much easier on him than crutches. It's paramount to do the physical therapy "homework" every day--this will determine whether or not he recovers completely or ends up stiff and hurting. Exercise, exercise, exercise! Don't let him skimp on his therapy! After the scar heals, about 10 days, massage the scar with vitamin E cream and move the kneecap back and forth and side to side to prevent adhesions of the healing tissue. You want the inner scar to stay flexible. He will need a shower chair and a toilet seat riser to take care of his hygiene needs for a while.
This is just what I gleaned from personal experience. I'm sure others on here will have a lot of good advice for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Check on him every hour or so. I had bunion surgery and my husband and sons left me alone thinking I was okay. They never asked me if I needed a drink or something to eat. The only time they noticed me was when I got up to find them to get me something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,938 Posts
Mostly you need to make sure he uses those crutches correctly. If he was grumpy vedore he'll still be grumpy. All you can do is try to make sure he does what he was told. That is really ally ou can do. If he refuses to cooperate you can hit him with a frying pan to knock some sense into him or let him learn the hard way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,986 Posts
donac said:
Check on him every hour or so. I had bunion surgery and my husband and sons left me alone thinking I was okay. They never asked me if I needed a drink or something to eat. The only time they noticed me was when I got up to find them to get me something.
If they thought you were okay, then speak up to say that you aren't. For one, people aren't mind readers. For another, if you haven't figured it out, wives and mothers are supposed to be completely and forever invincible (but not strong). Men get upset when their dearest are even mildly ill. Somehow, some men even blame their women for getting sick in the first place. They don't LIKE it. It BOTHERS them.

They, on the other hand, deserve to be cuddled and coddled and etc. when THEY are sick or hurt.

and.... YOU got up to find THEM to get YOU something? What is this?? It make me sad for you, for some reason. It made me feel like you are being taken advantage of by unthinking (not necessarily uncaring or inconsiderate) people in your life, and you let them get away with it. That's fine if you are into feeling sorry for yourself or have mildly masochistic tendencies, but otherwise, speak up more often. You don't have to yell, just say the words.

Plus, if you could get up, then why didn't you get your own whatever? Maybe you really were mostly okay but you needed attention and some display of caring. Speak, beak!! :sm01:
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top Bottom