Knitting and Crochet Forum banner
  • Wondering how to use different site features? Please visit our FAQ. Still have questions? Post to our Community Help section for a speedy response.
1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
721 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
About 3 months ago i bought the pattern for the aston.I had seen all the beautiful ones on KP,so i thought i would like to try.It took me awhile to get the yarn i liked then about another 6weeks to start.I found the charts easy to follow with allthe written help as well.I was going fine untill the 4th repeat of the bud chart.I made a mistake so iunpicked a couple of rows and got back on track.Started chart 3 today but it didn't come out right.So again i unpickedit.Then i counted the stitches i had 20 too many.I didn't know where i had gone wrong so tonight iundid the 103 rows that i had done.I have been knitting for about 60years and i have never had to undo that amount of knitting before.My confidence has taken a beating and i am going back to what i know i can do.I will have another go at the ashton but not for a few months Barbara
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
Completely understandable! Sometimes we just get ourselves into a bind and can't seem to figure it out. You did the right thing by "walking away" for a bit. Next time you pick it up you will probably see and understand what you did or did not do correctly. Don't forget ... there are several of us here on KP that have made this shawl, so please ask questions if you get stuck. We are all here to help!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,511 Posts
I feel your frustration. You do have a good attitude, though, in saying that you will try it again after a while away from it.

A couple of suggestions for when you do try it again. Place markers between each pattern section and count each section on every row before you move the marker to indicate a section completed on that row. Also, run a lifeline every 10 or 15 rows so that you will not have to frog so much if you do run into an error.

These things are time consuming, but I find them to be a better use of my time than frogging and reknitting and much easier on the confidence level.

I wish you success in the knitting projects you do pick up and a quick return to complete that lovely shawl.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
The Holbrook is an easy knit. I find it way to easy. But its a great start for those who have not done one of Dee's shawls.

Now I did the Wilshire as my first shawl. With loads of help from other posts here. I was able to finish it.

Life lines were a must every 10 rows. Along with stitch markers for every repeat section. That way I could see what would be where. I learned to see and feel what stitch should be where, and how it should look before continueing.

It took me 2 weeks to finish the shawl. It was the longest project I have ever done.

Turned out ok. A little small to my liking but it worked out in the end.

It was keeping up with the repeats that was hardest for me.

I hope you will try again. Life lines save so much time when it comes to unpicking! That was the biggest help I found suggested here!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,787 Posts
I'm commenting because I understand the frustration. I have had to set aside both crochet and knitting patterns because they either didn't have the correct instructions or, in the case of knitting, the overall effect was not stretchy at all...not good when you're fitting the calf area on a sock. And it doesn't matter if you're using acrylic, cotton, or animal hair.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,971 Posts
Pinsandneedles and Peggy Beryl gave great advice that I'll remember myself. So far I haven't had to frog more than three or four long rows or a few short rows, but even that was more time than I wanted to spend undoing and redoing. My only problem is that I've found life lines difficult to get in place on a small gauge stockinette stitch. Haven't tried one on any intricate patterns (mainly because I haven't done anything that intricate, i.e. cable patterns or laces). When you do this, do you thread a line through after knitting the row, or do you somehow knit it in as you go? Oh, but then how would you get it out? I have much to learn! Actually, when I've had to frog several rows back I've inserted a thinner knitting needle where I want to stop raveling. That worked for me in such cases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,787 Posts
Norma B. said:
Pinsandneedles and Peggy Beryl gave great advice that I'll remember myself. So far I haven't had to frog more than three or four long rows or a few short rows, but even that was more time than I wanted to spend undoing and redoing. My only problem is that I've found life lines difficult to get in place on a small gauge stockinette stitch. Haven't tried one on any intricate patterns (mainly because I haven't done anything that intricate, i.e. cable patterns or laces). When you do this, do you thread a line through after knitting the row, or do you somehow knit it in as you go? Oh, but then how would you get it out? I have much to learn! Actually, when I've had to frog several rows back I've inserted a thinner knitting needle where I want to stop raveling. That worked for me in such cases.
With socks...I hope I can get back to the cuff...or straight part before the lace pattern. If I've started one sock with knit cast on...and tried crochet cast on...Had to rip that one out and start identically as the first sock was started. I have them posted in my modest list of postings. Less than 10...but I can connect the camera to this machine now...look out y'all! <G>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,506 Posts
knitwitch,i'm right tere with you,i'm haveing trouble in the same place, so put it away untill after the new year,
when i don't know
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
721 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thank you for all your replies.I did put markers in with every pattern repeat,but i don't know of life lines.what are they,when do use them ,and how do you put them in.Once again thank you all.Barbara
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
Don't give up Knitwich. I too had to did the Ashton as my first chart and shawl and had to unpick a few rows - a few times but I had learned about lifelines and luckily this made things easier. There are so many more experienced people on here who will explain lifelines a lot better than me or yo can search here - so I will leave it to them so I don't confuse you. But - it will be worth it when you finish - I know I felt a great sense of achievement even though my work was not perfect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,960 Posts
Please don't give up, Barbara! It doesn't sound as if you used any lifelines, and I strongly suggest you do. When I knit Ashton, it was my first lace project and I probably used more lifelines than were necessary, but that's what worked for me. Try one on every fourth purl row, or at least before each new chart or repeat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,960 Posts
Norma B. said:
Pinsandneedles and Peggy Beryl gave great advice that I'll remember myself. So far I haven't had to frog more than three or four long rows or a few short rows, but even that was more time than I wanted to spend undoing and redoing. My only problem is that I've found life lines difficult to get in place on a small gauge stockinette stitch. Haven't tried one on any intricate patterns (mainly because I haven't done anything that intricate, i.e. cable patterns or laces). When you do this, do you thread a line through after knitting the row, or do you somehow knit it in as you go? Oh, but then how would you get it out? I have much to learn! Actually, when I've had to frog several rows back I've inserted a thinner knitting needle where I want to stop raveling. That worked for me in such cases.
Some knitting needles (KnitPicks) have a small hole in the metal connector that you can thread your lifeline through so that you are placing the lifeline as you purl across. (If you do it this way, remove the markers so the lifeline doesn't go through them; I use only one on Dee's designs, just after the center stitch, and it can be removed.) Absent that, move your knitting off the needles onto the cable, thread a tapestry needle with your lifeline, and just run it through all the stitches on the cable (go around any markers). Leave enough length on each end so you don't accidentally pull it out. I use buttonhole twist, a sturdy sewing thread, but there are other materials you can use, too (just NOT dental floss). Just leave the lifelines in place till the project is done. You can place lifelines as often as you like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,872 Posts
I really detest having to cast on lots and lots of stitches. BORING! But I have learned to slip a marker ever 20 stitches, or if tons of stitches-every 50. And before I put that marker on the needle, I count again to be sure the count is accurate. It adds time to the cast on, but makes it easy to determine how many stitches you have. My first top down project was the February Lady Sweater, which was also my first lace project. Crazy me--trying to learn two techniques at once. I cannot tell you how many times I had to tink and then try to figure out where I was in the pattern. Oy Vey!!! Wish I knew about lifelines then. I do now!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,960 Posts
A lifeline "preserves" all the stitches on a given row, so if you have to frog for some reason, you only have to frog back that far. If that is required, you rip your stitches back to the lifeline, then use the lifeline as a guide where to put your needle back in. Of course, we all hope that our mistakes are only a stitch or two back, in which case we can easily tink to corect them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,872 Posts
A lifeline is put in, usually between the end of one pattern repeat and before the next repeat so that if you have to rip out any rows, you rip back to the lifeline that is holding the stitches, and then you know you are supposed to start on the first row of the pattern repeat. For example, if it is a 4 row repeat, you would put your lifeline between row 4 and row 1 of the next 4 rows of the repeat. Some people use dental floss. Some people use a contrasting piece of yarn. I sometimes do that, or more often, use a circular needle in the same size or close in size as the lifeline. Just works best for me to do it that way.
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top Bottom