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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After 9/11 the airlines banned any kind of sharp object, such as scissors and knitting needles. These items had to be packed in the luggage compartment and not used openly on the plane.
Before this occurred, I was flying from Calif. to Atlanta and had just completed knitting a Barbie skating outfit: White yarn with silver threads and a full, fluffy skirt trimmed in bright blue metallic eyelash yarn. I had already finished a matching headband and white figure skates. While I was sewing the seams (similar to a one piece bathing suit with a full skirt), several passengers were watching and wondering what I was doing. "Is that knitting?" "What is that bunch of sparkly stuff you are sewing?" I just quietly tied and last knot and worked in the loose threads. Then I pulled a Barbie doll out of my knitting satchel, dressed her in the costume, headband and slid the skates on her feet. They all smiled and started asking questions. The cabin attendant walked by and asked if she could take the doll to show the pilot, because his 8 year old daughter was an avid Barbie fan. She returned with the doll, stating that the captain wanted to purchase it immediately, what price was I asking, and could he have that one or did he have to wait until I made another one and mailed it to him? I sold him the outfit and even put it in a clear plastic sandwich baggie.
I haven't flown since that time, but have scheduled a flight to Chicago in the near future.

Does anyone know if knitting needles are still banned? How about a circular needle?
 

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The TSA regulations allow for knitting on planes. There isn't much of a problem doing that on domestic flights in the U.S. However, TSA agents have discretion to ban any item they feel is a threat. I haven't heard of any confiscated needles on any message boards in a while (within the U.S.) I traveled back in December with several projects in my carry-on. I used circular needles, but I noticed a fellow passenger with straights.

Here's a link to the relevant page of the TSA regulations:
http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/assistant/editorial_1252.shtm
 

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I have flown with my knitting also...knitting on the plane as well. The one caveat would be to have a yarn cutter that is "child safe" so they can't confiscate your best pair of scissors because you might stab your seatmate with your stork scissors or some such idiocy. I have one of those pendant styles that is actually decorative as well so many people don't even know the real purpose. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Lisa R. I checked the TSA website and was relieved to see that I will be able to take my knitting satchel aboard the plane.

Cheri, I'm glad you were allowed to continue knitting on your plane ride. Guess they aren't as strict as they were immediately after 9/11 - back then, even tiny little manicure scissors were confiscated at check-in.

I will be flying Delta and will be checking their website prior to departure.

Thanks again.
 

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I just flew Air Tran at Christmas time and no problem with needles, straight or circular. I knitted the whole way there. Not a scissor though. I copied the flying instructions from the website, and had that piece of paper with me when I was boarding, is case anyone asked questions. It is nice that they allow it again.
Now ,if you had no yarn, and the needles were hidden in your inside pocket, and you looked suspicious(??), that might be another story.
 

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I've never had a problem flying with knitting needles and I have a pendant yarn cutter, but because TSA agents can disallow items at any time, I bring a padded self-addressed envelope and proper postage along with me. That way if they won't let me take them on the plane I can mail the needles back home.
 

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The last time I flew - and not long ago - knitting needles were once again allowed but be careful with scissors. I always carry knitting and crocheting projects on board. LOL!! Crochet hooks are allowed, too.

One security guard said that if he had his way knitting needles would be banned permanently. LOL!!

These things change from time to time - call ahead to inquire, perhaps?

Donna Rae
 

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as of last year they were still banned on the airplane that was Delta anyway, was able to have them in my suitcase thank goodness would have been lost without knitting for 2 weeks lol!
 

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Hi - I have flown several times in the last 2 years - Atlanta, San Francisco and NYC and not once have I had my knitting bag (with the needles in view) even questioned. One attendant adored the beautiful and pricey yarn I was using and I gave her a sample, a wrapper and name of store where it was purchased! There's something so "healthy" about knitters and needleworkers in general while traveling that it must make people either relaxed or in awe of them. In my case, a cane and white hair helped! But back to your question, I pack small a small scissor, case of sewing needles and circular and dp needles in my bag. Happy flying to you. dph
 

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I fly across country several timea a year and have never had any problems. I always bring onboardat least one circular, sometimes more. This past summer I flew to Italy and Germany and, again, encounterd no problems.
Thisis the latest from the TSA:
Knitting needles are permitted in your carry-on baggage or checked baggage. However, there is a possibility that the needles can be perceived as a possible weapon by the TSA screener. TSA Screeners have the authority to determine if an item could be used as a weapon and may not allow said item to pass through security. TSA recommends the following when bringing knitting needles on an airplane:

• Circular knitting needles are recommended to be less than 31 inches in total length
• We recommend that the needles be made of bamboo or plastic (Not Metal)
• Scissors must have blunt points
• In case the screener does not allow your knitting tools through security it is recommended that you carry a self addressed envelope so that you can mail your tools back to yourself as opposed to surrendering them at the security check point.
• As a precautionary measure it is recommended that you carry a crochet hook with yarn to save the work you have already done in case your knitting tools are surrendered at the checkpoint.

Most of the items needed to pursue a Needlepoint project are permitted in your carry-on baggage or checked baggage with the exception of circular thread cutters or any cutter with a blade contained inside. These items cannot be taken through a Security Checkpoint. They must go in your checked baggage.
 

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I fly all the time across the states and have not run into any problems. I was told by the airlines, that you need to have a knitting project on your needles. Not sure if you can fly with just a bag of knitting needles. In the past I have had only circular bamboo. Next week I will be flying, and hoping to get on with metal circular needles, because that is what I am using for a current sweater I am knitting. Has anyone flown with metal needles?
 

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1-28-2011 Hi. I have taken my knitting projects on several flights and have never had a problem. One airline did mention that it would be best to have wooden needles as opposed to metal, but I really don't think it matters. Happy flying!!
 

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It is correct that you can fly in the US with knitting needles. My knitting group friend had to take hers out of her carryon and put in her checked bag when she was flying home from France. Another woman said she flew in and out of Israel (!) with her needles without a problem. So when flying overseas beware!
 

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I visited my son in Washington state over the Christmas holidays and I flew Delta from Florida. I was allowed to take my knitting on the plane and I had 2 sizes of needles in my carry-on and worked happily on the flight and during the lay-over.
So I know Delta is okay with it.
 

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WHEN I FLEW TO ARIZONA A YEAR AGO I WAS TOLD IT ALL DEPENDS ON THE AIRLINE YOU ARE FLYING ON. SO CALL AHEAD. CROCHET HOOKS ARE OKAY AS THEY DO NOT HAVE A SHARP POINT THAT CAN HARM ANY ONE IS WHAT I WAS TOLD. GOOD LUCK. MARY
 

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Ladyfingers said:
After 9/11 the airlines banned any kind of sharp object, such as scissors and knitting needles. These items had to be packed in the luggage compartment and not used openly on the plane.
Before this occurred, I was flying from Calif. to Atlanta and had just completed knitting a Barbie skating outfit: White yarn with silver threads and a full, fluffy skirt trimmed in bright blue metallic eyelash yarn. I had already finished a matching headband and white figure skates. While I was sewing the seams (similar to a one piece bathing suit with a full skirt), several passengers were watching and wondering what I was doing. "Is that knitting?" "What is that bunch of sparkly stuff you are sewing?" I just quietly tied and last knot and worked in the loose threads. Then I pulled a Barbie doll out of my knitting satchel, dressed her in the costume, headband and slid the skates on her feet. They all smiled and started asking questions. The cabin attendant walked by and asked if she could take the doll to show the pilot, because his 8 year old daughter was an avid Barbie fan. She returned with the doll, stating that the captain wanted to purchase it immediately, what price was I asking, and could he have that one or did he have to wait until I made another one and mailed it to him? I sold him the outfit and even put it in a clear plastic sandwich baggie.
I haven't flown since that time, but have scheduled a flight to Chicago in the near future.

Does anyone know if knitting needles are still banned? How about a circular needle?
I had my good little scissors confiscated a few years ago. I purchased wooden needles to take and when the TSA person questioned I told him that I had left my metal needles at home but thought the wooden ones would be okay. He let me go, with them, but I knew it was his disgression. I guess a heavy set old lady with a little knitting bag just didn't fit "the profile." I haven't flown again since we moved to live near our grandchildren!
 
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