Knitting and Crochet Forum banner
  • Wondering how to use different site features? Please visit our FAQ. Still have questions? Post to our Community Help section for a speedy response.
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am somewhat new to knitting, self taught, you tube is great.
I am knitting right handed american fashion and trying to learn to knit continental which I am finding extremely difficult. Anyone have any helpful tips on learning to knit this style
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
I have also tried the continental method. For me.. that method seems easier and probably quicker especially for ribbing and since I was a crocheter first, it seemed to be more comfy to me. but.... it didn't feel like i was knitting.. I wanted a feel and look like I was knitting. :D I wanted to knit so bad. To me (and that is only my opinion) it was too much like crocheting.
I envy people who can use both methods and be comfy at it.
for right now I will stick to one method until I feel I can get that right. :lol:
good luck and post your progress.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,116 Posts
culshafer said:
I am somewhat new to knitting, self taught, you tube is great.
I am knitting right handed american fashion and trying to learn to knit continental which I am finding extremely difficult. Anyone have any helpful tips on learning to knit this style
((((((( I converted from English (American) off and on in these past 16 months and found it took awhile. I stayed with the knit stitch over nine stitches and made a garter stitch belt then triple knot fringed it. I also kept a practice swatch going to keep me refreshed. Making something while practicing inspired me to continue.

After being confortable with the knit stitch, I went onto purl and found the dip down finger method too cumbersome and chose to put a free finger on top of the loop/needle rather than go all the way down - that was consistent for me in not having the purl stitch slip off the needle.

As purling was harder for me, I had to work on it more.

My piano teacher once said, "It's not practice that makes perfect, but perfect practice makes perfect." So, find a good practice method that works for you and your circumstances then............don't quit.

Doing Continental now is almost second nature for me with most techniques except for purling three together.......then I switch back to English method.

Caution, if working a piece that you prize, don't mix the two methods together much.........like switching to C clear across the row after much English knniting was done first......you will PROBABLY find that your tension is different. It will SHOW.

I hope this helps! Donna Rae )))))))))))))))))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
Caution, if working a piece that you prize, don't mix the two methods together much.........like switching to C clear across the row after much English knniting was done first......you will PROBABLY find that your tension is different. It will SHOW.

[/quote]
good point!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
I just started trying to knit last week, but I can not use the english method. It just feels to strange to try to hold the yarn in my right hand. I had been doing it for a few days before I even realized there was a difference. I told my daughter who is learning with me that we were using the continental way not the english and she just looked at me like I was crazy and asked what the difference was. Ha Ha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,116 Posts
mammakim said:
I just started trying to knit last week, but I can not use the english method. It just feels to strange to try to hold the yarn in my right hand.

((((((((((( I wish I had learned Continental back in 1970! LOL! After 40 years and then to convert to C method, I though........Woah! LOL!!)))))))))

I had been doing it for a few days before I even realized there was a difference. I told my daughter who is learning with me that we were using the continental way not the english and she just looked at me like I was crazy and asked what the difference was. Ha Ha ((((((((( Hey, google around........there's Eastern Continental, Russian, Norwegian, Peruvian, Weird and Geek methods! LOL!! Donna Rae ))))))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
i am an avid crocheter so holding the yarn in my left hand is quite natural but knitting this way isnt so natural as holding the yarn in my rght hand and find purling easier with the english method vs the continental method.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,238 Posts
I found a couple of realy good tutorials on youtube. I've been knitting a long time and learned from someone who is Indian. I never knew it was called continental style until recently. It's just about the only way I know to knit. American style is very unnatural to me.

One thing I do differently than the tutorials I've seen is that I use my middle finger on the left hand to hook and hold the yarn over the right needle as I'm making the stitch. And the other thing that I did to help my granddaughter learn to knit is to show her how with crochet hooks. Use two the same size; you can't make a very wide piece obviously, but it helped her figure out the mechanics of the stitch without having to worry about holding onto the yarn.

Hope that helps.... Keep practicing and good knitting
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
I recently have had shoulder surgery on my dominant arm and had difficult time knitting. I am a throw knitter which I believe is what you are calling American style. So I did a LOT of research. I was determined to learn how to do "continental" knitting because I was told there was less movement of your hands and arms.
In my research I purchased many DVD's and found two wonderful DVD's. One is "Continental" and one is "Portuguese" style knitting. In my opinion these two are the BEST DVD's by far and both women are teaching leaders in the Knitting world (I have never met them, nor do I work for them – this is my own personal opinion as a visual adult learner). These DVD’s include info. on different cast-on methods, techniques and tips:
Continental - ABSOLUTE BEST WAY TO LEARN TO KNIT by Leslye Solomon owner of Woolstock Yarn Shop http://www.woolstock.com/about.htm
Portuguese - Learn How to Knit Portuguese Style by Andrea Wong http://www.andreawongknits.com/books.html
In the end I do a combination of these styles but mostly Portuguese because it is far less stress on your hands and arms/shoulders. If you decide to go with Portuguese and you are anxiously awaiting your Portuguese knitting “pin” and DVD – you can do a make shift one using a large safety pin (I use diaper pins) and a specific stitch holder, the tab that comes off of a new pair of purchased socks or a paper clip, however nothing is nicer than a true “Portuguese Knitting PIN”.
Hope this helps! The SasZKnitter
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,887 Posts
culshafer said:
I am somewhat new to knitting, self taught, you tube is great.
I am knitting right handed american fashion and trying to learn to knit continental which I am finding extremely difficult. Anyone have any helpful tips on learning to knit this style
Where are you? Have you had any luck at your LYS finding other knitters who might be willing to help you? I would offer, but not knowing where you live, it might be almost impossible to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,064 Posts
this method seems to be a bit easier for lefties and crocheters to pick up, but i'm a rightie and i do it most of the time...i suggest that people make a deal with themselves to begin each row with the 'pick' or 'continental' style...always do a dozen or more sts before switching to your old comfort zone...eventually, you will find yourself going farther and farther down the row as you hand muscles strengthen from the new working method...then one day, you will find yourself at the end of the row without switching...

one of the things you will gain is the ability to use either method depending on what you're doing...i knit two color stuff all the time by 'picking' one color from my left hand and 'throwing' the other color with my right hand...keep trying, you'll be glad you did...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
SasZKnitter said:
I recently have had shoulder surgery on my dominant arm and had difficult time knitting. I am a throw knitter which I believe is what you are calling American style. So I did a LOT of research. I was determined to learn how to do "continental" knitting because I was told there was less movement of your hands and arms.
In my research I purchased many DVD's and found two wonderful DVD's. One is "Continental" and one is "Portuguese" style knitting. In my opinion these two are the BEST DVD's by far and both women are teaching leaders in the Knitting world (I have never met them, nor do I work for them – this is my own personal opinion as a visual adult learner). These DVD’s include info. on different cast-on methods, techniques and tips:
Continental - ABSOLUTE BEST WAY TO LEARN TO KNIT by Leslye Solomon owner of Woolstock Yarn Shop http://www.woolstock.com/about.htm
Portuguese - Learn How to Knit Portuguese Style by Andrea Wong http://www.andreawongknits.com/books.html
In the end I do a combination of these styles but mostly Portuguese because it is far less stress on your hands and arms/shoulders. If you decide to go with Portuguese and you are anxiously awaiting your Portuguese knitting “pin” and DVD – you can do a make shift one using a large safety pin (I use diaper pins) and a specific stitch holder, the tab that comes off of a new pair of purchased socks or a paper clip, however nothing is nicer than a true “Portuguese Knitting PIN”.
Hope this helps! The SasZKnitter
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top Bottom