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Name on Ravelry: JessicaJean, no hyphen, no space.
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One problem I had is one of the needles slipped and went into my recliner and I had to get up, turn the whole chair over and hunt that one little needle. My fault, not the needle! If you happen to drop one, sometimes they roll to places you don't think to look. I have been down on my hands and knees many times looking under the recliner and other furniture.
Which is the reason I rarely use my dpns anymore. Circulars can’t escape as easily!
 

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I like 8" metal DPN's. I have Knit Picks and Knit Pro. I also have a set of Karbonz DPN's. I like the slickness of the needles because sock yarn has a fuzz to it and the stitches slide nicely. the longer length keeps stitches from falling off. Magic Loop made me crazy.
 

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I have knit socks on both Knit Picks metal needles and on Sunstruck. In the end, I prefer the metal ones. BTW, the only sock needle I have broken were the Karbonz. Everyone must do what is most comfortable, but I would not shy away from metal dpns. As for laddering-I find moving stitches around to move the needle crossover fiddly and annoying. I do tug the second stitch on my needle, and this helps prevent ladders. The other thing about ladders, if they are not huge, they seem to close up after wearing and washing. That plus experience. I have probably knit more that 100 pairs of socks. You are just beginning, so I wouldn't be too hard on myself. I'm in the camp that does not like Magic Loop. I feel that I am spending too much time pushing stitches around-very annoying. It probably helps that I learned on double point needles as a kid-long before the Magic Loop method was popularized.
 

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When I first started using double point needles, I purchased an inexpensive set of wooden ones. I wondered how long they'd last. Well, it's been over 7 years and I'm still using them. You'd have to get pretty rough with them to break them. I mainly use the #4, #5 and #6 needles for baby things and light weight blankets and sweaters.

One problem I had is one of the needles slipped and went into my recliner and I had to get up, turn the whole chair over and hunt that one little needle. My fault, not the needle! If you happen to drop one, sometimes they roll to places you don't think to look. I have been down on my hands and knees many times looking under the recliner and other furniture.
I have done a lot of couch diving for lost sock needles. My couch has eaten stitch markers, needles, ball bands, row counter and pretzels and goldfish crackers. We are expecting our new couch to be delivered in January. I'm hoping this couch will not eat so much stuff.
 

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I own the Knitpicks Sunstruck dpn set in sock sizes 0-3. The 6 sizes include 2.5mm (size 1+) and 3.0mm (size 2+).

The needles are 6", and there are 6 of each size. I like the warmer feel of the wood and the neutral color.

If you purchase, I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

Be well.
 

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Ok, I have finally settled on learning socks on dpns. I now need to decide if I want metal, or if I should try the sunstruck birch. I have knit hats and washcloths with Addi circulars. I am not a big fan of magic loop. I have used bamboo dpns with mostly success on my hats. . I did a practice run of a worsted weight sock and did notice ladders, even though I really tried to tug that first stitch on the needles. Practice makes perfect, but I think a slightly smoother needle may actually help in my case. I’ve seen reports of broken knit pics needles. Are they that easy to snap? I think my worst area for the threat of breakage would be right after picking up stitches, after the heel turn.
Suggestions? Thank you in advance. Lol

Penny
Avoid ladders by tugging on the first 2 stitches. If you only tug on the first, it can slip...when you tug on the Second stitch, you actually anchor the first one.
 

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Perhaps you should purchase some cheap bamboo dpn's first to see how they work for you, before splashing out on the expensive birch ones. I love dpn's too and have plastic, metal and bamboo ones, but would also go for Denise dpn's if there are such a thing? The old plastic ones are generally pretty tough, but I have broken some, so not all of them are tough. The ladders will disappear after a few washes I think.
 

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Name on Ravelry: JessicaJean, no hyphen, no space.
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...
The ladders will disappear after a few washes I think.
That may be true for socks; I don’t know.
I have a pair of worsted weight WOOL mittens which I bought at Goodwill. They’re thrummed, which was why I wanted them. After washing and darning a couple of moth holes, I noticed the ladders. Both mittens have very distinct laddering. So, no, ladders don’t necessarily vanish when washed.
 

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While I don’t voluntarily knit socks, I do knit mittens and gloves. If I have the needed size circular flexible enough for Magic Loop, that my preference.
I love using double-pointed needles, except that I tend to frequently drop the empty needle.
However, for thumbs and fingers - i.e. when playing around with ever fewer stitches - I change to 4” bamboo dpns. Why? Because they’re so lightweight and ‘grippy’, that they never fall out of the stitches. All my metal dpns do.

Personally, I haven’t ever had ladders when knitting in the round no matter by which method.
Long before I tackled dpns, I had read about laddering and how to avoid it. The tip was to slip the last three stitches back onto the just emptied needle, and continue knitting. Because the start/end of every round does NOT line up with the previous or next, there aren’t any ladders.
It was only after getting online that I read about pulling first or last stitch tight, but that couldn’t work for me anyway, because I already knit more tightly than most.

Yes, I well know one shouldn’t be changing the material of the needles partway through a project, but for my thumbs and fingers, it seems to work anyway.
View attachment 1269535
Love your mittens; they look VERY comfortable. I agree with you on the double points - I use both wooden and metal depending on the situation. I, too, do not get ladders and I suspect the reason I do not is the way I lay/hold my needles. I will try to explain [btw, I am right handed]. The left needle (or holding needle) sits below the right needle (the working needle) - so the "set-up" looks a bit like a tent. That way when you insert the right needle into the 1st stitch on the left needle it's as if you're working on a straight needle. My preference is the 5 needle sets with my stitches on 4 needles so they look like a box. I would take a photo but I'm by myself; can't knit and take a picture at the same time. Please don't hesitate to ask for clarification if needed. I'm glad you decided to learn the double pointed.
 

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My suggestion would be cheap but smooth wood or bamboo if you are just starting to use dpns. They are less slick and pretty hearty. I have never broken a dpn, I find that I actually don’t grip them as tightly when I am not afraid of them sliding out of my knitting, it is so much easier on my hands. I use a dollar store tooth brush holder with a cotton ball in each end to store individual dpn sets, it help keep them from breaking when not in use.
 

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While I don’t voluntarily knit socks, I do knit mittens and gloves. If I have the needed size circular flexible enough for Magic Loop, that my preference.
I love using double-pointed needles, except that I tend to frequently drop the empty needle.
However, for thumbs and fingers - i.e. when playing around with ever fewer stitches - I change to 4” bamboo dpns. Why? Because they’re so lightweight and ‘grippy’, that they never fall out of the stitches. All my metal dpns do.

Personally, I haven’t ever had ladders when knitting in the round no matter by which method.
Long before I tackled dpns, I had read about laddering and how to avoid it. The tip was to slip the last three stitches back onto the just emptied needle, and continue knitting. Because the start/end of every round does NOT line up with the previous or next, there aren’t any ladders.
It was only after getting online that I read about pulling first or last stitch tight, but that couldn’t work for me anyway, because I already knit more tightly than most.

Yes, I well know one shouldn’t be changing the material of the needles partway through a project, but for my thumbs and fingers, it seems to work anyway.
View attachment 1269535
Love the mitten pattern. Would you share?
 

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Name on Ravelry: JessicaJean, no hyphen, no space.
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My suggestion would be cheap but smooth wood or bamboo if you are just starting to use dpns. They are less slick and pretty hearty. I have never broken a dpn, I find that I actually don’t grip them as tightly when I am not afraid of them sliding out of my knitting, it is so much easier on my hands. I use a dollar store tooth brush holder with a cotton ball in each end to store individual dpn sets, it help keep them from breaking when not in use.
I have been knitting a long time and a bit of a hoarder I guess; but, I need larger containers for my dp's. I have connected 8 pencil cases for mine - also purchased at the $ store Rectangle Wood Tints and shades Electric blue Font
. I put a large size with a small size so I won't get confused.
Rectangle Wood Tints and shades Electric blue Font
 

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I have been knitting a long time and a bit of a hoarder I guess; but, I need larger containers for my dp's. I have connected 8 pencil cases for mine - also purchased at the $ store View attachment 1269765 . I put a large size with a small size so I won't get confused. View attachment 1269765
I do have a tackle box with removable dividers that I use for my collection of dpns but when I was first starting or if I want to separate out just a few dpns I use the tooth brush holders. They are great for traveling, I use them in project bags when I am going to visit family and am taking a couple projects I haven’t started yet since my visits tend to be a couple of weeks long and I don’t take big projects.
 

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Perhaps you should purchase some cheap bamboo dpn's first to see how they work for you, before splashing out on the expensive birch ones.
As. a heads up, I once ordered a couple of cheap sets in a short length and slightly longer. They weren't the quality and had splinters. I was used to Crystal Palace, which wood exceptional wood DPNs (are they still made?) as they are carbonized for finish and strength.

Anyway, you can buff lesser-quality needles with a fingernail buffer. Then some wax them using things like waxed paper. Beeswax would also work but tends to leave too much on the needles. I once had a splinter deep enough that I used a bit of Gorilla glue to reglue and then sanded the spot down (with nail buffer as GG expands). There are better quality wood glues out there...ask at Home Depot if in the US.

Long to short, a cheap set of bamboo might disappoint and frustrate your sock knitting. Of note, I always use metal DPNs, at least to work the heels, as wood types tend to break.

HTH, Elation
 

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I have knit socks on both Knit Picks metal needles and on Sunstruck. In the end, I prefer the metal ones. BTW, the only sock needle I have broken were the Karbonz. Everyone must do what is most comfortable, but I would not shy away from metal dpns. As for laddering-I find moving stitches around to move the needle crossover fiddly and annoying. I do tug the second stitch on my needle, and this helps prevent ladders. The other thing about ladders, if they are not huge, they seem to close up after wearing and washing. That plus experience. I have probably knit more that 100 pairs of socks. You are just beginning, so I wouldn't be too hard on myself. I'm in the camp that does not like Magic Loop. I feel that I am spending too much time pushing stitches around-very annoying. It probably helps that I learned on double point needles as a kid-long before the Magic Loop method was popularized.
I love my Chia Goo circulars for knitting socks. because of their lace tips and I don't really like wood.
 

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I do have a tackle box with removable dividers that I use for my collection of dpns but when I was first starting or if I want to separate out just a few dpns I use the tooth brush holders. They are great for traveling, I use them in project bags when I am going to visit family and am taking a couple projects I haven’t started yet since my visits tend to be a couple of weeks long and I don’t take big projects.
Great ideas! Mine are currently rubber banded together in a clear plastic storage box. I am going to try the toothbrush holder idea in my project bag. Thanks!
 

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Perhaps you should purchase some cheap bamboo dpn's first to see how they work for you, before splashing out on the expensive birch ones. I love dpn's too and have plastic, metal and bamboo ones, but would also go for Denise dpn's if there are such a thing? The old plastic ones are generally pretty tough, but I have broken some, so not all of them are tough. The ladders will disappear after a few washes I think.
They have actually come out with dpns @ Denise Interchangeables, only problem for me is the price they are asking for the set of them. They are expensive. Last time I checked, they wanted $150.00 for the set of flexible dpns.
 
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