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Hi - Just joined the forum, I taught myself to knit over 30 years ago, gave it up for 10-12 years and just started again in the fall of 2009. I've been having a lot of fun and then I came across an abreviation I'm having a hard time figuring out "yfwd". Is it yard forward, over the needle, or yard foward around the needle, or is there something else.

Any help you can give willb e appreciated - thanks.

Memere Linda.
 

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lwork348 said:
Hi - Just joined the forum, I taught myself to knit over 30 years ago, gave it up for 10-12 years and just started again in the fall of 2009. I've been having a lot of fun and then I came across an abreviation I'm having a hard time figuring out "yfwd". Is it yard forward, over the needle, or yard foward around the needle, or is there something else.

Any help you can give willb e appreciated - thanks.

Memere Linda.
Someone else just asked that question yesterday. (Isn't it great to know that we have all asked the exact same questions over the course of our learning this wonderful craft?) :lol: Here is the thread started yesterday with answers from several people: http://www.knittingparadise.com/t-2296-1.html

Hope that helps!
 

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(((((((( yarn is in back.........bring it between the two needles and to the front (or forward)..A YO is similar. Are you knitting English method, Continental method, Russian.........? There are many.........I'm thinking you're either English knitting or Continental.

I'm working on the Eastern Continental method now where the yarn always stays in the back.

Seriously.........for both the knit and the purl stitch. it's messing with my brain! LOL!! I haven't tried a YO or YFWD in this method - they probably don't require it. LOL!!

Donna Rae ))))))

lwork348 said:
Hi - Just joined the forum, I taught myself to knit over 30 years ago, gave it up for 10-12 years and just started again in the fall of 2009. I've been having a lot of fun and then I came across an abreviation I'm having a hard time figuring out "yfwd". Is it yard forward, over the needle, or yard foward around the needle, or is there something else.

Any help you can give willb e appreciated - thanks.

Memere Linda.
 

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I googled knitting abbreviations yfwd and found this.

YARN FORWARD (yfwd)

This term is usually used when the yarn is sitting at the back of the work (when a stitch has been KNITTED) but must be brought to the front before working the next stitch. This is done by bringing the yard from back to front under the right hand needle. This is often used in lacy patterns.

Hope this helps.
 

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lwork348
Ok, here's the deal. Do that row and the following row have the same # of stitches? They probably do. Usually if you have a dec followed by yfwd, the yfwd is a yarn over.
 

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lwork, if the pattern is from the US, we always say simply YO. Europe and Canada use yarn forward and yarn back. Ask the English. Both usually refer to a YO. (As in Hey, YO! lol)
 

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Judy M said:
Seems to me that Yarn over the needle is not the same as yarn forward

Yarn forward is when you move the yarn Under the Needle to change from knit to purl or purl to knit.
But, when you are doing a knit and yarn forward and continue to knit, you end up with a yarn over. Yes?

Just curious for discussion purposes. Thanks.

Carolyn
 

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Judy M. That is true, however, that is not the way it is used in Canadian and (especially) British patterns. Look at the instructions they include. Those instructions always include a yarn over as part of the movement. I guess the bottom line is: Look at 1) the abbreviation/instructions given in the book/booklet. 2)Look at the photo, if it includes yarn overs, then you are not changing from K to P.

Also, since moving the yarn from a back (knit) position to a front (purl) position is part of the purl stitch, it does NOT make sense to give that as a separate instruction.
 

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Donna Rae, you mentioned several methods of carrying the yarn and making the stitches. When I learned to knit 50 years ago, I was taught by two co-workers. They called their style (or method) European. What would you call it? I carry the yarn in my left hand, trailing between my index finger and the one next to it. I don't "drop" the yarn to knit the stitches. It simply slides through those fingers on my left hand. My right hand does most of the needle maneuvering. Do you have another name for this method?
 

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It seems that "names" change as time passes. In the 50 years since I started knitting, I'm sure that much has changed. I'm just trying to "get with the program" since I've been using the same instructions, etc. for all of those years. I just want to be able to understand what I read on this site.

Thank you, StitchDesigner, for your response.
 
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