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When mohair was high fashion some years ago it was often knitted on domestic machines, except for the silky type mohair with the long loose hairs. The trick was to knit very loosely, wax the yarn well and keep a slack tension on the yarn mast. Keep the cast-on comb on the work, very well weighted, and every third or fourth row yank downwards sharply the knitting to break any hairs caught up in the needles. With some mohair yarns it was advisable to work only on alternate needles. Give it a try, it is still better than hand knitting.
 

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Hi Moira, yes it is as long as it is not too thick. You can buy cones especially for the knitting machine. One tip though, put the cone in your freezer inside a polythene bag for a few hours prior to knitting with it, it helps it to knit more smoothly. Also you will need to keep pulling the work down more often, and watch for the hairs getting caught up on the gate pegs.. Leonora
mpalmer said:
Has anyone had experience of knitting with Mohair wool on a standard gauge KM?
I'm tempted to give it a try but I'm not sure if Mohair is suitable for machine knitting.
Thank you.
Moira
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would never have thought of putting wool in the freezer - I wonder who did it first! Moira

Leonora said:
Hi Moira, yes it is as long as it is not too thick. You can buy cones especially for the knitting machine. One tip though, put the cone in your freezer inside a polythene bag for a few hours prior to knitting with it, it helps it to knit more smoothly. Also you will need to keep pulling the work down more often, and watch for the hairs getting caught up on the gate pegs.. Leonora
mpalmer said:
Has anyone had experience of knitting with Mohair wool on a standard gauge KM?
I'm tempted to give it a try but I'm not sure if Mohair is suitable for machine knitting.
Thank you.
Moira
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Waxing wool is new to me. How do you do that? Moira
Elis said:
When mohair was high fashion some years ago it was often knitted on domestic machines, except for the silky type mohair with the long loose hairs. The trick was to knit very loosely, wax the yarn well and keep a slack tension on the yarn mast. Keep the cast-on comb on the work, very well weighted, and every third or fourth row yank downwards sharply the knitting to break any hairs caught up in the needles. With some mohair yarns it was advisable to work only on alternate needles. Give it a try, it is still better than hand knitting.
 

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mpalmer said:
Waxing wool is new to me. How do you do that? Moira[It is possible to buy a spray-on wax from some machine knitting supply firms, but the cheap-skate method we all mostly use is to tie a wax candle somewhere on the yarn mast so that the yarn passes firmly over it as you work. This gives a reasonable application of wax - not only for mohair but for most machine yarns unless they are specially prepared for machine knitting. If you are winding on a ball winder hold the candle in your hand so that the yarn goes across the candle as you wind - job done!lquote=Elis]When mohair was high fashion some years ago it was often knitted on domestic machines, except for the silky type mohair with the long loose hairs. The trick was to knit very loosely, wax the yarn well and keep a slack tension on the yarn mast. Keep the cast-on comb on the work, very well weighted, and every third or fourth row yank downwards sharply the knitting to break any hairs caught up in the needles. With some mohair yarns it was advisable to work only on alternate needles. Give it a try, it is still better than hand knitting.
[/quote]
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've found the spray on Metropolitan's website but I think I'll use your candle idea. Thanks for your help. Moira

Elis said:
mpalmer said:
Waxing wool is new to me. How do you do that? Moira

[It is possible to buy a spray-on wax from some machine knitting supply firms, but the cheap-skate method we all mostly use is to tie a wax candle somewhere on the yarn mast so that the yarn passes firmly over it as you work. This gives a reasonable application of wax - not only for mohair but for most machine yarns unless they are specially prepared for machine knitting. If you are winding on a ball winder hold the candle in your hand so that the yarn goes across the candle as you wind - job done!

lquote=Elis]When mohair was high fashion some years ago it was often knitted on domestic machines, except for the silky type mohair with the long loose hairs. The trick was to knit very loosely, wax the yarn well and keep a slack tension on the yarn mast. Keep the cast-on comb on the work, very well weighted, and every third or fourth row yank downwards sharply the knitting to break any hairs caught up in the needles. With some mohair yarns it was advisable to work only on alternate needles. Give it a try, it is still better than hand knitting.
[/quote]
 

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Yup, I can confirm the advice to place your yarn in the freezer - have knit several items in mohair in the past and used this tip successfully. give it a try, the results are well worth it.
 

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I was attending a machine knitting class by a knitwear designer Moira, and she was the one that told us about putting the yarn in the freezer. Many UK machine knitters do this with mohair. You should use wax on all your machine knitting yarn, but not from a spray. You can buy small wax discs that sit on the little metal plate on your yarn mast near the top, which has a prong for where to sit it. If you're not sure what I'm talking about, I'll pop over and show you anytime you want. Leonora.

mpalmer said:
I would never have thought of putting wool in the freezer - I wonder who did it first! Moira

Leonora said:
Hi Moira, yes it is as long as it is not too thick. You can buy cones especially for the knitting machine. One tip though, put the cone in your freezer inside a polythene bag for a few hours prior to knitting with it, it helps it to knit more smoothly. Also you will need to keep pulling the work down more often, and watch for the hairs getting caught up on the gate pegs.. Leonora
mpalmer said:
Has anyone had experience of knitting with Mohair wool on a standard gauge KM?
I'm tempted to give it a try but I'm not sure if Mohair is suitable for machine knitting.
Thank you.
Moira
 

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Hi, I have over the years knitted many things with Mohair and also put my mohair in the freeer which did work. When a garment is knitted I always used a teasel brush to comb tha mohair lightly through. This is a small nail type wire comb. The Mohair stands out and looks beautiful. My freind still has her black cardigan I knitted some 12yrs ago she wears only on special occasions and still gets complimented. Good luck with your knitting.
 

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When I use yarn that has a fuzzy quality to it such as mohair I use a unused clean drinking straw just before the carriage. I thread the straw with the yarn before placing the yarn in the carriage. I then do any cast- on method I want to. The straw flattens the fuzzy fibers before being knitted. Also. A slight yank on the knitting every now and again is also needed. Hope this helps
 

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Well, mpalmer, I'm glad you asked this question. There are some great answers and I wish I had asked the same question before I used a fuzzy ww on my bulky machine. I finished the sweater, but, it was tough going. Now, I know what I should have done. Thanks MKers.
 

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Cones for machine knitting come already waxed to run through the machine more smoothly, so they don't feel as soft until after you wash them. However, all the machines I've ever had came with a wax disc that fitted on the tension mast. I have tried candles but they shatter often when you put a hole through them, so they usually need to be warmer than normal. Wax for for sealing food in jars works a bit better. Mohair is a bit like feathers for stuffing duvets....a good freezing nakes them much easier to work with.
mpalmer said:
Waxing wool is new to me. How do you do that? Moira
Elis said:
When mohair was high fashion some years ago it was often knitted on domestic machines, except for the silky type mohair with the long loose hairs. The trick was to knit very loosely, wax the yarn well and keep a slack tension on the yarn mast. Keep the cast-on comb on the work, very well weighted, and every third or fourth row yank downwards sharply the knitting to break any hairs caught up in the needles. With some mohair yarns it was advisable to work only on alternate needles. Give it a try, it is still better than hand knitting.
 

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I'm currently knitting with this very pretty purple mohair on my bulky. my biggest problem is getting the tension right on the mast. somewhere along the way it changes and i have to change the tension again. i haven't tried freezing but i think i will tomorrow. oh the tension on the carriage i keep really loose or it just looks like a tight no definition mess. which might be good if your going to end up felting the piece but if not not some much. oh and punch lace won't show up with it. I'm not sure why it is a very thin yarn but it just looked like fare isle probably because it is so fuzzy.
other than the tension problem it has been pretty easy to work with.
 

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does anyone have a favorite store for cone yarn? not sure about other countries but this one seems very few places carry cone yarn
 

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mpalmer said:
Has anyone had experience of knitting with Mohair wool on a standard gauge KM?
I'm tempted to give it a try but I'm not sure if Mohair is suitable for machine knitting.
Thank you.
Moira
this is a punch lace i am currently swatching. because the mohair is so fuzzy the lace is more like texture than actual lace. something to remember is keep the weights up close to the top or it will drop stitches.(yeah i didn't do that and stitches got caught on pegs, i had to walk away for a minute :roll: ) watch that the mohair is actually keeping tension as you slide the carriage across if it isn't you may have to hold it above the carriage slightly till i catches in the first stitch. this happens cause sometimes it likes to stick to the brushes. always watch your tension and it is better i think to cast on with waste yarn if your doing mohair even though i don't; i usually do about ten rows of strait stocking nit before starting any stitch .

i haven't tried weaving yet but i think that is the next thing i am going to try with it.
 

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mpalmer said:
Thank you everyone for your suggestions - I'll let you know how I get on. Moira
good luck. i just finish this last one. and i have decided that mohair knits fine in stocking net but using punch cards hasn't yielded a look i am really happy with so from now on I'm going to hand manipulate stitches with the mohair since those swatches looked the best.
 
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