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Shylinn said:
I need to add that the magazines were intended to start you at the very first steps of each craft, and every project posted in following weeks was designed to elevate you skill level so that after some time, you actually were pretty much of an expert. I have the magazines from the first one - so if I want to learn to tat, for instance. I just go to the early volumes when they introduced tatting, and start at "how to hold the shuttle".
Thank you for the information on Golden Hands. It sounds like a really good magazine. I remember a little magazine called the "Work Basket" that had all kinds of crafts in it. It seems that my Grandmother got it. I somehow ended up with one or two of them, but it doesn't seem as thorough as your Golden Hands.
 

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In my lace shawl collection are medium blue, red, off white (rectangular), white (triangular), soft green (large square). On needles are an almost finished black circular and an indigo blue that has only recently been started. I definitely wear the white one the most and second most worn is the green on. I do not have a favorite designer rather just choose by the pattern. Typically I knit with lace weight though I have no objection to the fingering weight just depends on the pattern and color. Next time I knit lace with black yarn, the pattern will be one simpler than the one I am about to finish. Both my DD's want a black lace shawl. Books I have collected are: "Knitted Lace of Estonia" by Nancy Bush, "Traditional Knitted Lace Shawls" by Martha Waterman, "Folk Shawls" (my 1st!) by Cheryl Oberle, an Oberlyn booklet and Jane Sowerby's gorgeous book, "Victorian Lace Today". The book by Waterman is a good resource book with chapters on designing shawls, shaping shawls, stitch patterns and finishes (borders, etc) as well as a chapter on caring for shawls and patterns for knitting them. In my stash is a lilac, red hand dyed, a variegated pink and lilac & one with blue, cream and beige for a pattern on Ravelry - wingspan. I am collecting the yarn for the Symphony of Stripes shawl in the Knitter's Magazine summer 2015 k119. Thanks for asking your ? Now I am sure how I will be spending my next few knitting years. Lol. And that I do not need to buy more yarn for a shawl well except for those 2 black ones for my DDs. ????
 

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Lately my new love is Estonian lace in fingering or lace weight yarn. I prefer animal fibers or blends, but avoid cashmere for environmental reasons. I like the triangle shawls best. I've made the Ashton shawl numerous times, a!so I enjoy making a variation of the swallowtail shawl, which I knit stockinette down to the start of the lily of the valley pattern. The colors I like best are ivory color and blue. Darker colors are difficult for me to see.
 

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Lurker 2 said:
My very favourite circular is this one from Golden Hands in the 1970's. You pick up the stitches along the border, in six segments and knit into the centre.
You know how much I love this shawl Julie, I just gave one away recently. I knit 10 centre sections on mine.

The pattern is in Cleckheaton nursery album, pattern 16 and called Baby Shawl. It is also in Knitting & Crochet for Babies The Best of Golden Hands. It is called Circular Shetland Shawl. It is also in all you can knit and crochet for babies Golden Hands Special.????
Ros
 

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Love dee,,,, i love knitting shawls,,knit 4 while camping this summer,,, completing no 5 now, i knit Waiting For RAin, ravelry, keeping it for Me! It is crescent shaped , stYs on shoulders well, the other three werae thr Thurnton shawl, easy , it is assymetrical triangle, fun to knit, i am currently knitting the Ashton. I also knit 3 lacy baby swaters for my 9 mths ggd.
 

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I enjoy knitting with fingering and lace yarn. I have several rectangles done some with beads and some not. Several of Dee's triangles. All the delicate lace ones are put away. Too fancy for me to wear. I have an old basic triangle done in red heart ombre that is large enough to use as a throw. It is the
one I grab first. Need to retire it but for escorting visitors out the door and talking while they get in their car, it is perfect. Have used it to cover me for a nap and the cats enjoy being bundled up in it. Well worn and well loved.
 

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m_azingrace said:
Lately my new love is Estonian lace in fingering or lace weight yarn. I prefer animal fibers or blends, but avoid cashmere for environmental reasons. I like the triangle shawls best. I've made the Ashton shawl numerous times, a!so I enjoy making a variation of the swallowtail shawl, which I knit stockinette down to the start of the lily of the valley pattern. The colors I like best are ivory color and blue. Darker colors are difficult for me to see.
At the risk of seeming dumb, what is the environmental problem with Cashmere?
 

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RosD said:
You know how much I love this shawl Julie, I just gave one away recently. I knit 10 centre sections on mine.

The pattern is in Cleckheaton nursery album, pattern 16 and called Baby Shawl. It is also in Knitting & Crochet for Babies The Best of Golden Hands. It is called Circular Shetland Shawl. It is also in all you can knit and crochet for babies Golden Hands Special.????
Ros
:sm24: Thanks for the extra sources, and correcting my faulty recall, Ros! Indeed I always think of you, when I see this one!
 

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Lurker 2 said:
At the risk of seeming dumb, what is the environmental problem with Cashmere?
Many of us are old enough to remember when cashmere was truly a luxury item, so expensive that only the wealthiest could afford a small scarf. Suddenly in the past 15 or so years it's everywhere at very affordable prices. Curious, I wanted to know why. So I googled it. What I discovered was disturbing. Cashmere is the soft under fleece produced during the extreme cold winters in China and Mongolia. It is harvested by hand. So far, so good, okay? Now enters the need to increase supply to meet demand. In this endeavor, herds have to be increased, leading to over breeding, and decreasing the overall quality of the product. If the problem ended there, we might say "so what?". However, the impact of increasing the herds is having devastating effects on the environment. When sheep graze, their tendency is to eat the plants right down to the root, leaving nothing for regrowth. We aren't talking about a couple hundred animals destroying a few acres....the herds are huge. Their simple need for food is literally creating deserts where there used to be grasslands. The long term effects impact the entire planet. In addition, the animals themselves are suffering from lack of adequate nutrition. That's it in a nutshell. If you want to know more, you can Google like I did. There are a number of informative articles.
 

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m_azingrace said:
Many of us are old enough to remember when cashmere was truly a luxury item, so expensive that only the wealthiest could afford a small scarf. Suddenly in the past 15 or so years it's everywhere at very affordable prices. Curious, I wanted to know why. So I googled it. What I discovered was disturbing. Cashmere is the soft under fleece produced during the extreme cold winters in China and Mongolia. It is harvested by hand. So far, so good, okay? Now enters the need to increase supply to meet demand. In this endeavor, herds have to be increased, leading to over breeding, and decreasing the overall quality of the product. If the problem ended there, we might say "so what?". However, the impact of increasing the herds is having devastating effects on the environment. When sheep graze, their tendency is to eat the plants right down to the root, leaving nothing for regrowth. We aren't talking about a couple hundred animals destroying a few acres....the herds are huge. Their simple need for food is literally creating deserts where there used to be grasslands. The long term effects impact the entire planet. In addition, the animals themselves are suffering from lack of adequate nutrition. That's it in a nutshell. If you want to know more, you can Google like I did. There are a number of informative articles.
I was going to ask the same question, since I have a few pygora goats that produce a luxurious undercoat over the winter. But I understand the overgrazing thing. When one of my sheep or goats is employed as a lawn mower in the yard, it heads straight for the dandelions. After eating the blooms, they gnaw the thing down to ground level. I only wish the dandelions would not return. LOL! Our small heard has cleared all of the blackberries and almost all of the thimble berries and salmon berries off the 7 acres of pasture that we have. They like the wild huckleberries: blue and red, and sallall, too. They also like to bark fruit trees and eat fir sprouts. It would be very easy to allow our property to be eaten to the ground.
 

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I began knitting Shetland designs by Sharon Miller. I am not nearly as good a knitter as her, but I love her patterns. I usually do a smaller version. The first one I did took me a year. I decided I did not have that much patience.

Barbara
 

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m_azingrace said:
Many of us are old enough to remember when cashmere was truly a luxury item, so expensive that only the wealthiest could afford a small scarf. Suddenly in the past 15 or so years it's everywhere at very affordable prices. Curious, I wanted to know why. So I googled it. What I discovered was disturbing. Cashmere is the soft under fleece produced during the extreme cold winters in China and Mongolia. It is harvested by hand. So far, so good, okay? Now enters the need to increase supply to meet demand. In this endeavor, herds have to be increased, leading to over breeding, and decreasing the overall quality of the product. If the problem ended there, we might say "so what?". However, the impact of increasing the herds is having devastating effects on the environment. When sheep graze, their tendency is to eat the plants right down to the root, leaving nothing for regrowth. We aren't talking about a couple hundred animals destroying a few acres....the herds are huge. Their simple need for food is literally creating deserts where there used to be grasslands. The long term effects impact the entire planet. In addition, the animals themselves are suffering from lack of adequate nutrition. That's it in a nutshell. If you want to know more, you can Google like I did. There are a number of informative articles.
:sm24:
 

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Thanks to this topic and responses I know Shetland Borders is a good Ravelry search. Have looked up all the designers mentioned and bought some stuff! Also, found freebees! I am new at lace and these comments are good helps!
 

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My favorite is the one that is calling to me to be knit just then. Right now I have four skeins of Madelinetosh in the color Virgo (I'm born on the last day of Virgo), and I'm now looking for the right pattern for it. I've also got a cone of merino/tencel talking to me. One or the other may become a new version of Girasole, but I'm not sure yet. I've got a bunch of patterns in my Ravelry library, and there are a couple of Pi Shawl patterns that have been teasing me, and then I'm considering one of two skeins of hand-dyed from Mad Color's subscription series that are speaking to me about doing the Ashton again for a friend. That's after I finish this latest Giraffe for a baby gift, and an Eeewooo for my DIL's sister's coming baby. Oh, and before you ask, the sister, college education notwithstanding, can't pronounce "ewe" correctly. My son, who helped us while we were raising sheep, didn't understand what she wanted either, so he had to have her describe what she wanted. He just laughed and laughed when she told him, "you know, what your mother has."
 
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