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Good Morning everyone,

Any help here would be great.

After years of not knitting, I have come back to knitting. I'm trying to tackle harder projects that are out of my comfort zone.

I'm trying to do lacey patterns, Is there a way I don't know about?
Problem?
When the pattern continually repeats, on the row, is there a way of keeping the pattern correct, so that when you finish the row, you have the same amount of required stitches. to keep the pattern correct.

I have tried using markers which are a problem to open /close with my hands.

I have tried writting down on paper, but still manage to have incorrect stitches at end of row.

Any help would be great. Or should I just stick to p/k

Thank you
 

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I am curious as to what kind of markers you are using that requires you to open/close them. The stitch markers I use just slide from needle to needle. You could also make your own markers using bits of yarn tied into a loop, twist ties from the produce aisle at the store..... My secret - which is not really a secret - is to used index size cards/papers and write each row out. I then make a mark on each page as it's completed. Not sure I helped you any, but that's what I do.
 

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Don't attach a marker to a stitch. Place markers on the needle between stitches to indicate where each new pattern repeat begins. As you knit, when you get to the marker you will work the last stitch of one repeat, then slip the marker from the left needle to the right needle, then work the first stitch of the next repeat and continue on your merry way. The marker is not attached to the knitting in any way, it is simply riding along on the needle between two stitches, and will move up from row to row as you work without you having to touch it at all.

When you are working with markers in this way then you will know almost immediately if your stitch count is off. If you get to a marker before you are finished working a repeat, then you have lost a stitch somewhere, and if you finish a repeat before you get to the next marker then you have too many stitches. In both cases, you have pinpointed the location of the error to somewhere between the two markers in the current repeat section that you are working.
 

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TammyK said:
Don't attach a marker to a stitch. Place markers on the needle between stitches to indicate where each new pattern repeat begins. As you knit, when you get to the marker you will work the last stitch of one repeat, then slip the marker from the left needle to the right needle, then work the first stitch of the next repeat and continue on your merry way. The marker is not attached to the knitting in any way, it is simply riding along on the needle between two stitches, and will move up from row to row as you work without you having to touch it at all.
When you are working with markers in this way then you will know almost immediately if your stitch count is off. If you get to a marker before you are finished working a repeat, then you have lost a stitch somewhere, and if you finish a repeat before you get to the next marker then you have too many stitches. In both cases, you have pinpointed the location of the error to somewhere between the two markers in the current repeat section that you are working.
Good job explaining that, Tammy! I also write each row on a separate, numbered index card and when I finish that row I immediately move the card to the bottom of my stack. If you don't do it right away and have to sit your knitting down, you won't remember if you've done it or not. Most lace patterns you can figure out by "reading" the row you've just knitted, but when your first getting started on your project, sometimes it's hard to tell. The other suggestion I would make, is to make sure you put which numbered row is each card is AND rubberband your stack of index cards together while your working. I was knitting in the car once when my DH slammed on the brakes suddenly. My unnumbered cards went flying. I couldn't remember which row I was working on and I had a mess on my hands to try to sort out! If you have pets, children or a hubby around, your cards will get knocked around while your working! A rubberband around your stack of cards can be a lifesaver!
 

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A very experienced knitter in my group always uses index cards with one row of instructions per card. They are held together through a hole punched in the upper left corner of each card by a round ''key-ring'' type circle that opens easily and closes securely.
 

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I always use the rule, 'Every time I decrease (lose a stitch) I need to increase (make one). This way I end up with the correct number of stitches. Because it's difficult keeping the pattern correct when decreasing for armholes, etc, I make a concerted effort to get to know my pattern before reaching the armholes. I say to myself, 'A hole that's where I brought the yarn forward, a diagonal stitch is where I slip one, knit one pass the slip stitch over, etc' Hope this helps.
 

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In addition to all the wonderful advice give so far, Novice, I would add to chart your pattern. Once I discovered charting my lace work improved 100%

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n_8I7IvpA8U

These may give you an idea how to write your own charts. I make my charts on the computer, print them on 4x6 cards have the chart on one side and a picture of the pattern on the other. I put a little dot next to the row I have completed.
 

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Some lace patterns increase and decrease numbers of stitches in rows because they have decorative sides ( leafy lace patterns tend to do this). So sides are not straight edges but are jagged (in a pretty way). Hope that makes sense. Anyway, could that be why your counts seem to be off? Don't give up on lace! Here's an easy pattern: http://firebirdknits.blogspot.com/2008/06/beginners-lace-scarf.html The photo doesn't do it justice. I like to do sampler lace scarves and this pattern is in each and every one.
 

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The markers I use are simple plastic circles that don't need to be opened or closed. I think Susan Bates makes them, and I've never been in a store that sold yarn that didn't sell these. Knit Picks sells them, too.
 

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I use very small rubberbands for my markers. It bothers me to knit with a hard marker. I like a soft marker that can easily be knit around. Then I use differnt colors to donate the repeats and the border.
 
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