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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to make a pair of fingerless mitts but instructions are in cmm, I have tried looking them up but have gotten confused. The pattern calls for Needles size 3.75mm and 3mm also 3mm dons. Also 2..5cm for ribbing then 4cm for length. Also 7 cm and then total measurement 14cm. The pattern is a very nice one which also has a nice hat to go with it. https:/www.yourfamily.co.za/crafts/fingerless-gloves. I hope this will work if anyone is interested. Thank you for any help-nanad
 

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Copied this for you from Google.

Inches to Centimeters Conversion

1 Inch is equal to 2.54 centimeters (cm). To convert inches to centimeters, multiply the inch value by 2.54. For example, to calculate how many centimeters is 2 inches, multiply 2 by 2.54, that makes 5.08 cm is 2 inches.
 

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nanad said:
I would like to make a pair of fingerless mitts but instructions are in cmm, I have tried looking them up but have gotten confused. The pattern calls for Needles size 3.75mm and 3mm also 3mm dons. Also 2..5cm for ribbing then 4cm for length. Also 7 cm and then total measurement 14cm. The pattern is a very nice one which also has a nice hat to go with it. https:/www.yourfamily.co.za/crafts/fingerless-gloves. I hope this will work if anyone is interested. Thank you for any help-nanad
Google is your friend. Just type in (number) '___ cm equals ___ inches'.
 

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nanad said:
I would like to make a pair of fingerless mitts but instructions are in cmm, I have tried looking them up but have gotten confused. The pattern calls for Needles size 3.75mm and 3mm also 3mm dons. Also 2..5cm for ribbing then 4cm for length. Also 7 cm and then total measurement 14cm. The pattern is a very nice one which also has a nice hat to go with it. https:/www.yourfamily.co.za/crafts/fingerless-gloves. I hope this will work if anyone is interested. Thank you for any help-nanad
I am in Canada and we switched to metric many years ago, but I learned in feet and inches. I still have a problem. When I see a sign on the road that says how many km to where I'm going, I haven't a clue how far that is. I just multiply that by 6 and then I get it in miles. I guess you can't teach an old dog new tricks. I really dislike the metric system and it's probably because it's not what I first learned. I could be mistaken, but I think the US is the only country in the world that's not gone metric. (I could be wrong). Lucky you!!
 

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This converter converts any imperial to metric and vice versa http://www.worldwidemetric.com/measurements.html ANd while it will give you an exact measurement if it says for example 4.7 inches it will not be that important. Go with 1/2 inches (unless for something really small with thin yarn when you might want 1/4 inches)
Doesn't work for needles of course as US needle sizes are unrelated to their actual size (as were the old English sizes).
 

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My son ( who was brought up in the metric era) still works things out in feet and inches, and so do I.
Just about all of my tape measures are in CM and Inches.
 

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nanad said:
I would like to make a pair of fingerless mitts but instructions are in cmm, I have tried looking them up but have gotten confused. The pattern calls for Needles size 3.75mm and 3mm also 3mm dons. Also 2..5cm for ribbing then 4cm for length. Also 7 cm and then total measurement 14cm. The pattern is a very nice one which also has a nice hat to go with it. https:/www.yourfamily.co.za/crafts/fingerless-gloves. I hope this will work if anyone is interested. Thank you for any help-nanad
Rather than trying to convert cm to inches, or inches to cm, get yourself a ruler with cm on it, or a measuring tape with cm on it.
Then ignore all the inches, and use the cm to measure. You can then read it off the ruler of measuring tape, just like you would do with the inches. Take my word for it, it is not as difficult as it sounds.
Almost 55 years ago I had to do it the other way around: I came from Europe to Canada and suddenly had to deal with patterns not only in a different language (from Dutch to English) but also with measurements that were completely foreign to me (and knitting needles that had numbers rather than mm diameter sizes). Someone handed me a ruler with inches only on it, and told me to forget the name of the measurements, look at the numbers only! It worked!!!
Then Canada decided to go metric and fairly suddenly I had to switch back to metric. That's when I got both a ruler and a measuring tape with inches and with cm's on them. Just have to make sure I use the measurement name my pattern indicates, and after that, they're only numbers!
 

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I like too cook and bake and sometimes recipes are not in metric, like I'm used to, so I got myself some measuring cups that uses CUP instead of DL. Very handy. I do the same with inches in a pattern. I only convert if I need to see how much I need to buy of something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So confusing for me, I did get some help in getting the measurements but I don’t think I will be using the metric system again. Thank you to all for the help-nanad
 

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I use a small ruler by Lion Brand yarns that has inches, cm, and needle sizing holes in it, along with a tape measure that has cm on one side and inches on the other.

https://www.amazon.com/Lion-Brand-Yarn-400-5-8002-Knitting/dp/B001BEDUW4/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=needle+sizer+ruler+lion+brand&qid=1606946162&sr=8-1

Don't buy it from this seller on Amazon, because they're trying to gouge you on the shipping. I just wanted you to be able to see what it looks like.

Other people have essentially the same ruler available, so look around for a better price, or something you can buy while ordering yarn.

Almost all tape measures have cm on one side, and inches on the other. You can just measure either, or find the measurement on one side and turn it over to get the conversion to the other measurement. That way, you use no math or conversion tables.
 

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EstherOne said:
Rather than trying to convert cm to inches, or inches to cm, get yourself a ruler with cm on it, or a measuring tape with cm on it.
Then ignore all the inches, and use the cm to measure. You can then read it off the ruler of measuring tape, just like you would do with the inches. Take my word for it, it is not as difficult as it sounds.
Almost 55 years ago I had to do it the other way around: I came from Europe to Canada and suddenly had to deal with patterns not only in a different language (from Dutch to English) but also with measurements that were completely foreign to me (and knitting needles that had numbers rather than mm diameter sizes). Someone handed me a ruler with inches only on it, and told me to forget the name of the measurements, look at the numbers only! It worked!!!
Then Canada decided to go metric and fairly suddenly I had to switch back to metric. That's when I got both a ruler and a measuring tape with inches and with cm's on them. Just have to make sure I use the measurement name my pattern indicates, and after that, they're only numbers!
Having used both systems I alternate without thought. Since spending so much time on KP though I tend to think along the lines of inches-but everything else default is generally metric. But I have patterns in both. And my tape measures all have both on them. But if all your measuring devices are only in inches then you do need to be able to work out how many inches. And also if knitting a fitted item need to be able to work out which size is yours.
But with an appropriate measuring tape and knowing what size you are working it is easier to work in the measurement the pattern gives than converting each measurement in the pattern. And once climb over the mental hurdle it will be so much easier with future patterns.
 

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ReptilianFeline said:
I like too cook and bake and sometimes recipes are not in metric, like I'm used to, so I got myself some measuring cups that uses CUP instead of DL. Very handy. I do the same with inches in a pattern. I only convert if I need to see how much I need to buy of something.
But are your cups metric or imperial? and a UK pint is different to a US pint. And Australian tablespoon is different to a UK tablespoon (20mls here (4 teaspoons), 15 in UK (3 teaspoons)).
Though I will admit to using my metric cups with imperial recipes but they are actually a bit different-can't remember how much.
And my kitchen scales measure both which is handy. Many of my recipes are from my childhood and so are imperial.
3 years in the UK has ensued my girls can use both.
 

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nanad said:
So confusing for me, I did get some help in getting the measurements but I don't think I will be using the metric system again. Thank you to all for the help-nanad
Don't limit your patterns by needing to do something different. Most people in the world operate on the metric system so you limit yourself to US patterns only.
And most people in the knitting world manage to work with the imperial system for US patterns from using the metric system. Including some who have never used the imperial system.
 
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