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Last year I had a total nervous collapse (stress after caring for Alzheimers husband for quite some time.) I'm almost ashamed to admit this because I've always strutted around saying "I'm a capable, competent woman..."; it's a shock to find you aren't any more! A friend asked me to knit a baby jacket.. using a pattern I've used several times in the past, and it is NOT a complex pattern... medium difficult I would say. And I have been knitting since I was 3 yrs and 4 months old... I'm now 83!!! and I am horrified to find that I just can't follow the pattern correctly now... I've made 8 starts and have done 8 complete undo's! I was unutterably sad to contemplate the thought that I'd "lost" my knitting abilities (nowadays I only knit items for my favourite animal sanctuary/rescue/rehome charity to sell to help raise funds). Luckily I tried crocheting (which I didn't learn till I was mid-20s). Hooray! Thank goodness! I can still manage crocheting!!! So can still make things for the animal charity to sell!
 

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Hopefully your knitting skills will come back. Since you've had so much stress and a total collapse afterwards, it's possible that it will just take time for the brain to heal. I wouldn't be ashamed at all. I'm sure what you've gone through was extremely difficult and very stressful.
 

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Go easy on yourself. Full recovery can take time. There is no shame and it is especially shocking when you've seen yourself as a capable, competent woman for so long. Let me tell you that you still are a capable, competent woman! You have a good strategy with the crochet option. Just do what feels comfortable and gives you enjoyment. It might be stressful to agree to requests right now. Try to go with the flow and avoid putting stress on with deadlines, etc. You will get there. The caregiver load with Alzheimer's is often underestimated. Give yourself credit for your devotion.
 

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Angela
I have a friend who only knits hats now. She also was an advanced knitter. It's OK. We do hats for Everett gospel mission or children's hospital or heart assoc. and that's a good thing. We enjoy each other's company and knit together.
There are wonderful things to crochet also. I too am learning to crochet and found sound delightful things for my little grand daughter to play with. Chin up gal. You've just been through a very hard ordeal and you are going to be OK. Just take time to relax again and do some fun things. Be kind to yourself. That kind of behavior is healing to the soul. take care.:)
 

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HI Angela. so sorry to hear that you are having a really bad time. Stress does strange things to us. Sometimes the body is trying to tell us to allow us time to heal. You have not forgotten how to knit or read a pattern, it is just that you have other more important things on your mind. You know it is like riding a bike, you never forget we just get a bit wobbly. Take things slowly and just remember you have so many friends here who are with you and thinking of you. ????❤
 

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I too had an incident that left me unable to knit, I suffered severe depression for many years. I was not able to follow a pattern and could not remember how to do simple things. Fortunately with long term medical care I was able to regain the ability to do my crafts again, and now my knitting is a part of my therapy. I feel your pain.
 

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PAJulian said:
HI Angela. so sorry to hear that you are having a really bad time. Stress does strange things to us. Sometimes the body is trying to tell us to allow us time to heal. You have not forgotten how to knit or read a pattern, it is just that you have other more important things on your mind. You know it is like riding a bike, you never forget we just get a bit wobbly. Take things slowly and just remember you have so many friends here who are with you and thinking of you. ????❤
:sm01: :sm01: :sm01: :sm24: :sm24:
 

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Do not be discouraged. You just need time to assimilate all the stress you have experienced and heal. Although the brain is not a muscle one can still compare it figuratively to having had a muscle strain. You need to rest it and let it recuperate. I would knit only when you are feeling rested and at peace and then resume with simple projects such as scarfs and dish clothes. I think you will find all the stitches in your memory will return. Be kind to yourself.
 

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Dear Angela , I Read your story and take my hat of to you.Caring for a sick husband for a long time is just exhausting and you need rest and loving ,take care of yourself now.Just try not to stress about knitting and enjoy the crotchering , in time things will be settle for you and be back to normal - be kind to yourself ,you deserve it ! Sending you love and encouragement from a long way away , Ose
 

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Please do not think you are no longer a strong woman. You have proved you are many ways over. The brain is like every other part of the body, if it is injured it takes time to heal. But thankfully it is very resilient. I agree with the YouTube suggestions. Just watching these will "trigger" the memories. Don't worry, we are here to help you along.
 

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It takes a strong woman to admit her limitations. You've been through a lot which is bound to effect you. There's no reason to think you can't and won't get your knitting skills back, given enough time and healing. Please don't be so hard on yourself. God bless and keep you. Lynn
 

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#1. Be kind to yourself. I agree with all the posts on page 1.
You will find many of us on KP have been through similar situations and we are surviving. It takes time to heal believe me, but we somehow manage too.
My husband passed 3 years ago, there's many a time I still shake my head as to what I was able to do during his many years of illness. But like you it does take a toll on the mind and body. Just be patient and you will soon find you will be back to knitting your favourite things.
Good Luck, remember you are now #1 so pamper yourself every now and then with something, anything.
 

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Angela W said:
Last year I had a total nervous collapse (stress after caring for Alzheimers husband for quite some time.) I'm almost ashamed to admit this because I've always strutted around saying "I'm a capable, competent woman..."; it's a shock to find you aren't any more! A friend asked me to knit a baby jacket.. using a pattern I've used several times in the past, and it is NOT a complex pattern... medium difficult I would say. And I have been knitting since I was 3 yrs and 4 months old... I'm now 83!!! and I am horrified to find that I just can't follow the pattern correctly now... I've made 8 starts and have done 8 complete undo's! I was unutterably sad to contemplate the thought that I'd "lost" my knitting abilities (nowadays I only knit items for my favourite animal sanctuary/rescue/rehome charity to sell to help raise funds). Luckily I tried crocheting (which I didn't learn till I was mid-20s). Hooray! Thank goodness! I can still manage crocheting!!! So can still make things for the animal charity to sell!
My heart goes out to you, Angela.
After my husband passed away, I had to do simple things for a while. A few days ago I attempted a lace pattern. After several false starts, I finally figured it out. I still have to mark my place and count every row.
I applaud your strength.
Sending hugs,
 

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Don't be hard on yourself. You literally gave 100% of yourself to caring for your husband. Think of yourself as an Olympic athlete. They leave it "all on the field" or "all in the pool." When they are done, they are truly drained and so were you. It takes a long time to replenish your body and spirit. That's why the Olympics are every four years, so give yourself all the time you need to heal. You are a champion to have taken care of your husband. Most people could not do that!
 

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Mtn Knitter said:
Go easy on yourself. Full recovery can take time. There is no shame and it is especially shocking when you've seen yourself as a capable, competent woman for so long. Let me tell you that you still are a capable, competent woman! You have a good strategy with the crochet option. Just do what feels comfortable and gives you enjoyment. It might be stressful to agree to requests right now. Try to go with the flow and avoid putting stress on with deadlines, etc. You will get there. The caregiver load with Alzheimer's is often underestimated. Give yourself credit for your devotion.
Absolutely!
 

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Angela W said:
Last year I had a total nervous collapse (stress after caring for Alzheimers husband for quite some time.) I'm almost ashamed to admit this because I've always strutted around saying "I'm a capable, competent woman..."; it's a shock to find you aren't any more! A friend asked me to knit a baby jacket.. using a pattern I've used several times in the past, and it is NOT a complex pattern... medium difficult I would say. And I have been knitting since I was 3 yrs and 4 months old... I'm now 83!!! and I am horrified to find that I just can't follow the pattern correctly now... I've made 8 starts and have done 8 complete undo's! I was unutterably sad to contemplate the thought that I'd "lost" my knitting abilities (nowadays I only knit items for my favourite animal sanctuary/rescue/rehome charity to sell to help raise funds). Luckily I tried crocheting (which I didn't learn till I was mid-20s). Hooray! Thank goodness! I can still manage crocheting!!! So can still make things for the animal charity to sell!
I understand, as I cared for both of my parents until there passing at home. My papa died at age 58 of complications of Alzheimer's.
Please be good to yourself and give your self time! Many hugs and blessings sent your way????
 

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Oh Angela, I can empathize with you. I cared for my mom for 7 years with Alzheimers and it is terribly overwhelming and exhausting for the caregiver. It is extremely hard for a woman who has always thought of herself as strong and the one who can take care of others to realize that there is nothing she can do to remedy the situation or to stop her loved one from disappearing before her eyes. When you were taking care of your husband all your effort and attention focused on him. Taking care of yourself became secondary. Now its time for you to take care of yourself. It will take time. I am said that you said you are almost ashamed to admit you are not wonder woman. The fact that you took care of your husband for a long period proves you are still strong and capable. I am close in age to you and have had difficulty acknowledging that I can't do all I want to or could do when I was in my 50's or 60's. So I just do what I can to the best of my abilities at this time. That's all God requires of us. When I have difficulty with a pattern (brain freeze?) I usually write each row pattern on a card and keep the card with the pattern row I'm working on to the top of the pile. When I finish that row I place that card to the back and continue with row 2, row 3 etc. placing the card for each row to the back as completed. That way I only have to concentrate on that particular row. It seems that writing it out also helps me see what I should be knitting. That may help you. Meanwhile be assured that all of us on KP are supporting you. Warm regards...Geo
 
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