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When I was a child I was taught how to knit by a woman from Italy. She taught me to hold the right needle under my arm and work with the left one. To this day, and I am 59 yrs old, I cannot use short needles or circular needles because I need to hold one side of my work! Any suggestions on how I can do patterns that call for circular needles?
 

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((((((( I sometimes hold the 14" or longer right hand needle under my arm and even sometimes prop the left one on the seat. LOL!! What ever works, works!!

I think practice will help you. The circulars drop anyhow with yarn accumulation and shouldn't be much trouble there and you can get short cable needles, too.

I have an extensive collection of longs and short in the single points and really enjoy them, older interchangeable circular sets, tons of hooks and organizers, counter top displays for both hooks and needles and cant get enough.

So, sit down and practice with the shorts and force yourself to not put it under the arm. I would think that under the arm with shorts would work to some degree and would depend on your pattern.

I'm holding shorts under my arm now and not having any troulbe knitting. I'd prefer it to be straight knit or purl rows, though! LOL!!

Good luck!

Donna Rae
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Bellamo said:
When I was a child I was taught how to knit by a woman from Italy. She taught me to hold the right needle under my arm and work with the left one. To this day, and I am 59 yrs old, I cannot use short needles or circular needles because I need to hold one side of my work! Any suggestions on how I can do patterns that call for circular needles?
 

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I am determined to learn continental style knitting. I am new to knitting and use the "American style", throwing the yarn with my right index finger. When I start my next project I am determined to do it continental! There is so much less movement and it seems to go faster. If I can learn a new way, so can you! Try watching a video on the internet, there are so many and they are so helpful.
Lois
 

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((((((( Lois, have you tried the combined continental method:

She discussed applications, too.

Good luck!

Donna Rae
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Loistec said:
I am determined to learn continental style knitting. I am new to knitting and use the "American style", throwing the yarn with my right index finger. When I start my next project I am determined to do it continental! There is so much less movement and it seems to go faster. If I can learn a new way, so can you! Try watching a video on the internet, there are so many and they are so helpful.
Lois
 

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My in-laws knit that way, too; they learned in school in Syria. It makes for very tight knitting. I can't let them use my plastic or bamboo needles, because they break them! Ditto for the crochet hooks!
Last month I taught myself to knit backwards, because the Ten Stitch Twist pattern was driving me crazy - turning the project every ten stitches is a pain! If I can manage to knit backwards at age 65; you should be able to manage circular needles at age 59. It will take patience - a lot of it. Your fabric will NOT be identical to the way it is now. It can be done and YouTube may be helpful.
I learned Continental style from the start, but can do English if I want. Just don't try switching between them on the same project, unless you're using both hands and two different colors.
Good Luck!
 

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I, too, use this method, and love it for speed. I have made afghans with the longest needles I can find and just 'scrunch' the stitches so I DON'T have to use circulars. At 60, I think this old dog is too old to learn something new :lol:
 

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Bellamo said:
When I was a child I was taught how to knit by a woman from Italy. She taught me to hold the right needle under my arm and work with the left one. To this day, and I am 59 yrs old, I cannot use short needles or circular needles because I need to hold one side of my work! Any suggestions on how I can do patterns that call for circular needles?
yes, if you go to www.allfreeknitting.com/castingon

or how to knit
this should take u to a guy named Onix Terevinto.
He teaches this & other tutorials

Just look at the choices to the RIGHT

OOPs I guess i didn't read down far enough in your post,
soerry
 

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You're just a pup around here.
I am wondering what the ages of this group would break down to??
Circulars just take alittle getting used to. I am now using them to makemy first pair of socks. Love them on projects to avoid seams as much as possible. Come on give it a try.
Linda
PS I'm older than you :)))
 

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Ladies (and gentlemen if any) Let's drop that "too old to learn new tricks" line. I am 67, have been knitting since I was about 5 yrs old, and have taught knitting in English/American style, Continental, Continental Combination, Continental Eastern Uncrossed, Portuguese, the right needle under the arm routine (which some of us call Irish style), and frankly use most of them from time to time. Each has one or two things that makes it perfect for some stitches, and a bit tricky for others. Circulars are my needle of choice whenever possible, because I like to knit in a comfortable old arm chair, and when I use long straights, unless I do hook the right one under my arm, (or into my belt), I have trouble with them hitting the arms on the chair. With circulars, my personal preference is to buy them approximately 40" long, so I can knit both socks of a pair at the same time, or put a large afghan on them, etc. I also like to use sets of interchangeable needles, because on some knitting I find it works better to use a needle about 2 sizes smaller on the left hand. It makes the fabric slip across easier, with less tugging and pulling. (Remember, it is the working needle in the right hand that determines your gauge, so using the smaller needle on the left side doesn't affect the final result, just makes it easier to slip across the joints, etc. So, if I can do all this at my age, so can you. Just because you were taught one method doesn't mean you can never learn another. Specialization is for insects. Mankind should know how to do a little of everything. (Quoting from Heinlein--my favorite author.)
 

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good morning,
I also learned to knit, many years ago, by my little auntie, but she taught me to knit, with my left needle, under my left arm.
I want to thank everyone, who helped me master the Rapunzel/potato chip scarf.

I love it. Could not vision it, till I got going on it.
I will try and send a picture of it when finished.
You all are "amazingingly", helpful !
Thank you again,
Carole Terese :D
 

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I, too, was taught to knit by a woman from Italy and she taught me to hold the needle under my arm. It really helps keep your from getting tired. However, I needed to learn how to use the short needles and the circular needles later on and only practice "made it perfect". It is slower for me to knit with short needles but it works. Just keep practicing!
 

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Hey, I am 75 so you are just a spring chicken yet! I am secretary-treasurer for our Landowner's Assoc. (have been for 20 years), secretary for our Extension Club, a volunteer member of our fire dept., substitute pianist at church, teach a Women's Bible study, and handle all the inside and outside work here. If I can have time to learn "new tricks", you can too! Just make up your mind and DO IT!
 

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Boondocks said:
Hey, I am 75 so you are just a spring chicken yet! I am secretary-treasurer for our Landowner's Assoc. (have been for 20 years), secretary for our Extension Club, a volunteer member of our fire dept., substitute pianist at church, teach a Women's Bible study, and handle all the inside and outside work here. If I can have time to learn "new tricks", you can too! Just make up your mind and DO IT!
God Bless You !! you run circles around me ! :thumbup:
 

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I have been discussing "pit knitting" in several of my posts, but found this link on YouTube this morning. The Yarn Harlot is one of my heros. She has a great blog, and while she doesn't generally give much in the way of instruction, she has some great demo videos. Here is one of her doing her "pit knitting" which tucks the right needle under her right arm and give more support, freeing the right hand up a bit so it can be used to quickly advance the finished knitting and keep everything going smoothly. It is very closely related to knitting with a sheath or a knitting belt. Just another variation on the great hobby of knitting. Hope you enjoy seeing her.
She also demonstrates her DPN method for socks and small projects.
 

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I also knit w/the right needle under my arm (learned from a nice Italian lady). It is definitely faster and easier on my hands.

From time to time I have used a circular needle (especially baby blankets that don't fit on a straight), but I don't enjoy working with them.

If I want to do a circular project, I use dpn's. I even found a set of 16"-long double points which I can tuck under my arm if I want, but so far I have done only small things that are circular and my double points work fine for those.
 
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