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Does anyone else remember a shop , I think they were in New England. They did a lot of sweaters in intarsia, very inticate pictures? Their work was beautful, and I have a book of theirs. But I can't find the book. It must be at the bottoms of some stash in the back bedroom. ONe of these days when I have nothing else to do, I"ll go looking for it. Ha, Ha!! When I have nothing else to do. My husband is home now, he has had a bad summer. From May 18th, he has been in the hospital or a nusing home for the entire summer. But does anyone remember them? And what happened to them?
 

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Are you thinking of North Island Yarns (Designs) from Maine? This was begun in the '80s by Chellie Pingree (now a U.S. Congresswoman from Maine). She produced kits that were distributed nationally, and published several pattern books. I believe there were lots of intarsia and fair isle designs with folksy/preppy appeal. I think the company started on North Haven Island and provided jobs for local people and an outlet for Maine wool.
 

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Unfortunately there are very few yarn stores in existence and when there is a yarn store, the supply is limited. IT's all about supply and demand....and the demand is not there...stores close. We learned about it in school - nowadays they take away even gym class!!! A few young people if curious enough will ask about it, people in the 60's grew up with yarn stores, fabric stores etc. because clothes weren't as available as they are today. (However cheaply made.) As my grandson once asked me - holding up my knitting needles - grandma what are these sticks for??? I explained to him what it was for and we ended up having a very pleasant afternoon learning to knit. I sent him home with a ball of wool and he proudly finished what he calls a scarf. Would you believe this 10 year old boy told his friends that he made it himself and was the envy of his peers. He wears his scarf very proudly to school every day! Now he is learning to crochet which he finds easier and less of a chance he will poke his eye out! LOL!
 

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I love that your grandson wanted to learn to knit and actually accomplished a finished product. That is lovely. Mine likes to pull the yarn out of the skein for me. He calls it "yarning" as in "Grammy, do you want me to yarn for you?" He also has loaned me his hands when I wind skeins. I am definitely going to try to get him to learn very soon. I just hope he keeps up his interest. I do think the crocheting poses less "danger"!
 

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I think it's great too. My son (now in his 50's), taught himself to cross stitch when he was in college and did very inticate pictures. He wanted to learn to crochet, but we were never together long enough to teach him.

Where do you buy yarn that is still in skeins? Even the fancy yarns I find at fabric/yarn shows is wound on a machine.
 

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I love the stories of passing on. to the next generation.My great niece 13yrs. asked if I teach her to knit.It was a wonderful feeling to share.She was so greatful. making a "neck warmer" no pattern. for little sisters birthday.
 

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My cousin Lauren has her own shop in Wallingford Ct. Country yarns she has a web site and carries many kinds of yarn. She also has a llama and a few sheep, which are pets, LOL, but she spins her own wool from them and makes beautiful things.
 

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Bernat Spinning Mill was in Uxbridge, Ma. Close to Rhode
Island. They sold out to a company in Canada.
Years ago, I bought yarn there. Bernat was the first
yarn that I used to crochet my first afghan.
The mill burned down a few years ago.
 
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