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Can anyone tell me how to figure out if a project calls for 16 oz of worsted yarn. how much would I need in 50 gm balls. I know someone can help me. Everyone is so helpfull. Need to start new project soon and really need to make sure I have the right amt. of yarn. Thanks
 

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Sue in Florida said:
Can anyone tell me how to figure out if a project calls for 16 oz of worsted yarn. how much would I need in 50 gm balls. I know someone can help me. Everyone is so helpfull. Need to start new project soon and really need to make sure I have the right amt. of yarn. Thanks
16 oz = 454g. In theory 9 balls should do it, because it's unlikely a pattern would use every last pennyweight of yarn. However, whenever I substitute yarns I always check the yardage because that's a far more accurate measure.
 

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Check this site out that converts many other things, too + it's available in other languages:

http://www.bing.com/search?q=gram+to+ounce+conversion&FORM=MFEINA&PUBL=Google&CREA=userid1743107cec4662c2812b512a5be6f5010969

SHORT ANSWER = There are approximately 28.35 gm (grams) of the metric system in one oz (ounce). (453.6 grams total over 16 oz/s)).

Good luck & HAND!!
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Sue in Florida said:
Can anyone tell me how to figure out if a project calls for 16 oz of worsted yarn. how much would I need in 50 gm balls. I know someone can help me. Everyone is so helpfull. Need to start new project soon and really need to make sure I have the right amt. of yarn. Thanks
 

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When doing this kind of conversion, it is not enough to just get an equivalent weight, you need to make sure the length of the yarn in meters is equivalent to the yards (or vice versa)

It also helps to note the manufacturers recommended needle or hook size and the gauge guide. Since all of this is on the wrappers and the online listings by manufacturer have this, you can do it right at home.

If you have a lys with a large selection of fibers, it is also good to compare the "hand" and the elasticity of the 2 yarns. Sometimes what might appear to be inconsequential differences can create big gauge hassles.
 

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Budster said:
It's all about the yardage, baby.
I have two different DK yarns beside me at the moment for different projects. One has 95yds per 50g ball, the other has 125yds. It really is essential to do the sums based on the yardage and needle size, simply buying the same weight doesn't always work.
 

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Oh wow! I am going to print this whole line of talk out and give it to every one of my chemistry students next year. So when they start to groan when I teach "conversions", I can tell them how important is is to know how to do conversions. Maybe I can find more "examples" on a home improvement site?
 

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chem said:
Oh wow! I am going to print this whole line of talk out and give it to every one of my chemistry students next year. So when they start to groan when I teach "conversions", I can tell them how important is is to know how to do conversions. Maybe I can find more "examples" on a home improvement site?
A cookery site would be a good place. A UK pint has 20 fluid ounces (568ml) not 16 for starters, therefore a gallon of water weighs 10 lbs (8x20/16). Then there are the weight conversions into Metric.

Even if they don't all go on to become great scientists, they'll all have to buy food in the shops and cook for themselves, getting the conversions wrong can taste vile!
 

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Well, I know since the first time I used a "non american" recipe, I substituted fluid ounces for weight ounces (2 onces of flour is NOT two fluid ounces)! of course it does make better sense to weigh flour.
 

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chem said:
Well, I know since the first time I used a "non american" recipe, I substituted fluid ounces for weight ounces (2 onces of flour is NOT two fluid ounces)! of course it does make better sense to weigh flour.
The fun and games I've had translating and converting American recipes into English. Terms like a 'stick of butter' had me stumped for ages and the notion of measuring butter in 'tablespoons' got me too; was I supposed to melt it first, so I could pour it into a tablespoon? Of course the whole cup thing is really confusing, what sort of cup? Do you mean breakfast, tea or coffee? But, then maybe I'm thick!

Of course, in England we have the added amusement of running Imperial and Metric (French) side by side. To me, the French system's numbers seem too cumbersome for domestic use, a single gram is tiny and really only applicable to spices. Also, base 10 is very limiting because there aren't enough useful factors for scaling; I seldom have 10 to dinner, but frequently need to convert a receipt for four portions to one for three.

Recipe writers often give parallel quantities using both systems; the proportions are correct in either... just don't mix them, that way madness lies!

Dave
 
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