Knitting and Crochet Forum banner
  • Wondering how to use different site features? Please visit our FAQ. Still have questions? Post to our Community Help section for a speedy response.
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,229 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to thank you all for your input regarding my problem. From all I have read on KP and reading and reading about my problem I believe it is truly the ulnar nerve that has caused my problem. The docs thought it was a pinched nerve in my cervical vertebra but I am now convinced it was not. Ladies, be careful how you hold the crochet hook, maybe buy some adapters to pad the hook. I cannot begin to tell you the agony I was in, not just in my fingers but all the way up the arm into my shoulder...and I'm no sissy, it's gotta be bad for me to go to a doctor or take a med. Take heed!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Do you have a recommendation on how best to hold the hook? I con only crochet for a short time because I know my arm is going to hurt if I do too much at a time. I wrap my hand around the hook. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,399 Posts
Funny that this has come up as what you think the problem is. I had to have my ulnar nerve removed and replaced. It was crushed in a work accident. I still have some problems but the pain from it not working was out of this world.
I suggest to people who work a lot at a desk or in a chair that they do not put too much pressure on the elbow. Plus to keep the elbow more extended as when you bend it for too long it can cause this type of pain. It took me almost 4 years to have the full feeling back in my hands.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,229 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Deb-Babbles said:
Funny that this has come up as what you think the problem is. I had to have my ulnar nerve removed and replaced. It was crushed in a work accident. I still have some problems but the pain from it not working was out of this world.
I suggest to people who work a lot at a desk or in a chair that they do not put too much pressure on the elbow. Plus to keep the elbow more extended as when you bend it for too long it can cause this type of pain. It took me almost 4 years to have the full feeling back in my hands.
Very sad story :( The pain is unbearable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
I hope you have had all the tests the Doc's require. MRI? It may well be a cervical vertebrae pinching a nerve. After my carpal/cubital tunnel release I went on to have steroids injected into my c-spine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
This exercise is called an "ulnar nerve glide". It keeps the ulnar nerve from getting injured, or more injured. I use it for the chronic tendonitis in my wrist.


Hold your arm out to the side, elbow straight, fingers gently curved but not in a fist
Rotate your arm fully until the palm is up.
Gently tilt your head (bring opposite ear towards opposite shoulder) until you feel tension
Straighten the neck until tension is relieved
Repeat 10 times

Alternatively,

Place your arm out to your side with the wrist pulled back as if you are saying "stop"
Bring your fingers toward your ear as if to cup the ear with the palm, fingers pointing to the shoulder.  Stop when you feel a gentle tension.
Bring your hand back out to the side until tension is relieved
Repeat 10 times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Remember to be very gentle. Neither Julie nor Excel PT is responsible for any injury you cause yourself by performing these exercises. Or me! You can also find these directions on the web if you google Ulnar Nerve Glide, or Exercises RSI tendonitis. These are commonly prescribed exercises, and great care must be taken to do them gently so that you do not injure yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,389 Posts
I'm currently seeing a physical therapist 3 times a week and they have me doing the Ulnar Nerve Glide exercises. HOWEVER, I am being instructed by a physical therapist on how to do them, how often to do them and how many repetitions to do. I'm also under the care of a hand surgeon, in addition to being on medication (anti-inflammatory).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,229 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Dominorip said:
Remember to be very gentle. Neither Julie nor Excel PT is responsible for any injury you cause yourself by performing these exercises. Or me! You can also find these directions on the web if you google Ulnar Nerve Glide, or Exercises RSI tendonitis. These are commonly prescribed exercises, and great care must be taken to do them gently so that you do not injure yourself.
Oh my, I must have scared you somehow. I'm not worried about injuring myself. I am a tough cookie, very flexible. I don't think these exercises could possibly harm any one. Compared to what I have been doing they are very gentle, mild exercises. Thank you for the warning though!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,229 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
courier770 said:
I would not have posted the exercise, it should be overseen by a qualified medical expert.
I have been receiving physical therapy and am under the care of a physician and chiropractor. These exercises were just a bit different than what I have been prescribed.

For me I think I am on the mend, just numbness and tingling but little to no pain. I think it's just going to take some time now for it to heal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
You didn't scare me. It is just that after I hit send, I realized that if someone injured themself doing this, they might decide it was my fault. So even though it is ludicrous, I just put in that little message just to be safe!
Everyone on this forum seems to be very interested in helping others, which is why I wanted to share this exercise. It has helped me so much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,229 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Dominorip said:
You didn't scare me. It is just that after I hit send, I realized that if someone injured themself doing this, they might decide it was my fault. So even though it is ludicrous, I just put in that little message just to be safe!
Everyone on this forum seems to be very interested in helping others, which is why I wanted to share this exercise. It has helped me so much.
Well I certainly understand your concern for being sued. Any one can sue any one for anything. Doesn't mean they will win but they can sue. We just came out of court 2 weeks ago from a year long ongoing lawsuit where we were being frivously sued. The judge tossed it out. What a waste of money. It cost us over $20,000 to defend ourselves for nothing. I could have used that money for many other things. Don't worry, I won't be suing you. And thanks again for the exercises.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Dominorip said:
This exercise is called an "ulnar nerve glide". It keeps the ulnar nerve from getting injured, or more injured. I use it for the chronic tendonitis in my wrist.

Hold your arm out to the side, elbow straight, fingers gently curved but not in a fist
Rotate your arm fully until the palm is up.
Gently tilt your head (bring opposite ear towards opposite shoulder) until you feel tension
Straighten the neck until tension is relieved
Repeat 10 times

Alternatively,

Place your arm out to your side with the wrist pulled back as if you are saying "stop"
Bring your fingers toward your ear as if to cup the ear with the palm, fingers pointing to the shoulder. Stop when you feel a gentle tension.
Bring your hand back out to the side until tension is relieved
Repeat 10 times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
My daughter (22) is a knitter who knits continental style and is having pain in her left arm and hand after knitting for only a short time. She is an avid knitter and began having this problem about 6 mo ago or more. She saw an occupational therapist (who is not a knitter) and she was not very helpful. My daughter has taken a break from knitting but now when she is starting again she is having the pain. She has tried different sized needles and different arm positions. Any Ideas?
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top Bottom