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For the first time ever my spouse has said he would wear a knitted item other than a scarf! (He's always been too warm with a sweater before) I'm so excited! The vest pattern he and I have chosen calls for making an "edge stitch" at either end. I've looked at the appreviations - no explanations. ALSO - the pattern calls for working the wrong side rows "as seen". Can I assume that means that if it looks like a knit stitch I knit it, and if it looks like a purl stitch, with the bump, that I purl it? I've been knitting a long time and never seen this language before. Help!
 

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Yes, you are exactly correct. Knit the knit, and purl the purl on the wrong side rows. I believe they mean to do a selvage stitch. This is usually done at the BEGINNING of each row, by slipping the first stitch of each row. What this does, is help keep the edges flatter,and it also gives you a nice easy stitch to see when sewing up the seams with a matress stitch. A hint though, it is always smart to read through your whole pattern from start right through finishing. Sometimes explanations are not put in the order they should be and sometimes things are explained within the pattern and not discribed in the abbreviations. Good luck.
 

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It's an old-fashioned way of abbreviating a stitch pattern. A lot of UK pateerns were written that way during the war so they'd use less paper, which was heavily rationed.

The edge stitch is a selvedge for seaming. If it's stocking stitch, for example, slip the first stitch on knit rows, knitwise; on purl rows, slip the first stitch purlwise. It really does make life a lot easier when you're seaming it up.

Dave
 

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FireballDave said:
It's an old-fashioned way of abbreviating a stitch pattern. A lot of UK pateerns were written that way during the war so they'd use less paper, which was heavily rationed.

The edge stitch is a selvedge for seaming. If it's stocking stitch, for example, slip the first stitch on knit rows, knitwise; on purl rows, slip the first stitch purlwise. It really does make life a lot easier when you're seaming it up.

Dave
And it means that you will add two stitches to your stitch-count for cast-on stitch total..
 

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jheiens said:
FireballDave said:
It's an old-fashioned way of abbreviating a stitch pattern. A lot of UK pateerns were written that way during the war so they'd use less paper, which was heavily rationed.

The edge stitch is a selvedge for seaming. If it's stocking stitch, for example, slip the first stitch on knit rows, knitwise; on purl rows, slip the first stitch purlwise. It really does make life a lot easier when you're seaming it up.

Dave
And it means that you will add two stitches to your stitch-count for cast-on stitch total..
Hmmmm.....add 2 stitches????........really?????
 

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DeeDeeF said:
I only add stitches if it says to, otherwise the pattern allows for them, I've found.
That's what I've found. With most yarns, plus or minus a stitch either end isn't going to make much difference to the size of a garment. It pays to read through the pattern carefully before casting on, it's usually pretty clear how it's supposed to be worked to make everything match up neatly.

Dave
 

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Another selvage stitch is to knit the first and last stitch regardless of which side of the work you are working. It will create a little 'knot' that facilitates picking up stitches for borders or seaming. Usually the pattern includes this selvage stitch but pay attention to ensure that is what they are doing.
 

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Dave's explanation is correct and it gives a great looking finished edge, especially to scarves because it get rid of that bump and valley look on the edge.
 

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FireballDave said:
DeeDeeF said:
I only add stitches if it says to, otherwise the pattern allows for them, I've found.
That's what I've found. With most yarns, plus or minus a stitch either end isn't going to make much difference to the size of a garment. It pays to read through the pattern carefully before casting on, it's usually pretty clear how it's supposed to be worked to make everything match up neatly.

Dave
I've never found the need to add extra stitches. Just work with what the pattern calls for.
Sue
 
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