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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
HI, I have a pattern for a sweater for a 6 yr old girl, but would like to knit it for my 10 year old granddaughter. Is there somewhere on the internet that tells you how to resize and calculate yarn for the new size? Thanks in advance for all your help!
 

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vickitravels said:
HI, I have a pattern for a sweater for a 6 yr old girl, but would like to knit it for my 10 year old granddaughter. Is there somewhere on the internet that tells you how to resize and calculate yarn for the new size? Thanks in advance for all your help!
Not that I know of. Whatever, it is going to take a lot of math. It would be easier to find a free similar pattern on the internet in the correct size.
 

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Agree with Joy finding a new pattern is easier - but if you're prepared to do the work, it can be done. Would take some time swatching and working out the math. Depending on the weight of yarn and complexity of the design used in the original design, you might get the size you want using a bulkier yarn and larger needles and adjusting the length.
 

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find a s10 yr old pattern and see how much yarn they use. if the pattern is a similar style it should work okay. also, you can compare the different amounts of yarn for the different sizes given in your pattern. for example, if the pattern comes in sizes 2, 4 & 6 how much more yarn is used per size change. go up in yarn amounts proportionately and then get an extra ball of yarn to be safe.
 

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Actually it isn't that difficult. You need to figure out what percentage you need to make it larger. Is the 10 year olds clothing 10% larger? 20% larger? 30% larger?

Once you figure that out the rest is easy. Cast on whatever the pattern calls for and add 20% (just for an example). Work the length 20% larger....work every aspect of the pattern 20% larger. In other words from cast on edge to armhole must be 20% larger, the length of the armhole must be 20% larger, etc..

I use patterns for adults and scale them back for children using this method and patterns for adults from children's patterns. I once made a whole family matching hoodie sweaters and only used one pattern.

It's a lot easier than you think.
 

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I just had an ah ha moment when I read your post. This is such excellent advice and should be simple. It will not skew any part of the existing pattern. This is going to the top of my list for helpful tips. Thank you.

courier770 said:
Actually it isn't that difficult. You need to figure out what percentage you need to make it larger. Is the 10 year olds clothing 10% larger? 20% larger? 30% larger?

Once you figure that out the rest is easy. Cast on whatever the pattern calls for and add 20% (just for an example). Work the length 20% larger....work every aspect of the pattern 20% larger. In other words from cast on edge to armhole must be 20% larger, the length of the armhole must be 20% larger, etc..

I use patterns for adults and scale them back for children using this method and patterns for adults from children's patterns. I once made a whole family matching hoodie sweaters and only used one pattern.

It's a lot easier than you think.
 

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Next time you're in a good lys, look for a little folder called "the knitter's handy guide to Yarn Requirements" by Ann Budd. Only $5.95 US. It has estimates of yardage for different sizes of items, each with several gauges to choose from. Looking at it just now, I see that the size 6 sweater chest measurement is 30"/76cm, while the size 10 is 34"/86.5cm. Handy little item to have while yarn shopping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks everyone for the posts-sometimes it takes a different pair of eyes to point out the obvious! I work in stained glass alot and there is a terrific program called rapid resizer which takes your pattern and keeps the integrity of proportions. Will look for the Ann Budd book! Thanks again all!
 
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