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Hi out there. I've recently returned to knitting after 30 years or more and need help with the gauge on my latest project. My yarn label for 4" is 17sts and 24 rows with size 8 needles. The pattern gauge is 24 sts and 32 rows with size 5 needles. The project is a child's sweater and the yarn is a 50/50 cotton acrylic bend. I've increased and decreased needle size but can't seem to arrive at the pattern gauge. Please tell me what to do. I'm in love with the yarn color and also the pattern and just want to start knitting. Thank you. Myrna.
 

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Well, try to get as close to the yarn gauge as possible. Then multiply the number of stitches per inch you are getting. Check with the total number of stitches on the pattern. You can go up or down a size to get the sweater to fit the child. Did that make sense?

Judy
 

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(((((((( Okie, you're using materials not called for on the label and perhaps a pattern that isn't designed for the yarn gauge. Right? If so, you're opening up a can of worms and must use an apples to apples ratio method (see below)

If the same yarn with a matching pattern, gauge can be reached by going up and down in needle sizes, and you've done that. Did you go UP or DOWN enough times? You need to do that and '''not stop''' trying until you've reached guauge.

So, your question '''really is '''' perhaps "how to convert gauge'''' from one pattern to another using different yarn, also which uses a RATIO as follows being sure to compare apples to apples:

**Known info Unknown info ?

______ ___________

***Known info *Known info

Multiply **K x *K divided x *** K = UK info
****** Make sure your info gets into the right columns = comparing apples to apples and no oranges get in there; There in, lies the trick = somewhat difficult is you've not done ratios for a long time or ever, for that matter.

Hope this helps!

Answer the posed question/s above, do the ratio, etc.

If you want / need further assistance, hail me in private messages. OKIE? Okie! LOL! I sometimes find that this is easier done over the telly phone, too! LOL!!
~~~~~~

volvo527 said:
Hi out there. I've recently returned to knitting after 30 years or more and need help with the gauge on my latest project.

My yarn label for 4" is 17sts and 24 rows with size 8 needles.
The pattern gauge is 24 sts and 32 rows with size 5 needles.

The project is a child's sweater and the yarn is a 50/50 cotton acrylic bend.

I've increased and decreased needle size but can't seem to arrive at the pattern gauge.

Please tell me what to do. I'm in love with the yarn color and also the pattern and just want to start knitting. Thank you. Myrna.
 

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I am certainly no expert, but I just keep trying different size needles til I reach gauge. I give more importance to the # of stitches per inch than # of rows because one can always knit longer or shorter piece, but the width, which is determined by the # stitches per inch can't be adjusted so you want the right # of stitches per inch from the start.
You want to match the gauge required in the pattern instructions, so if you're getting too few stitches per inch, go down a couple sizes in needles. if you are getting too many, go up a couple of sizes in needles. Keep at it and you will find a size that works for your pattern. Good luck!
 

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There's one other trick I've heard of [ though not personally used]. If your gauge is just slightly off just change one needle. That is you would knit the garment on 2 different size needles. If you knit tighter than you purl - which i believe is most common, try the larger needle on the knit rows. Also if you do this, let me know how it worked for you..and the rest of us.
 

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You are trying to use a worsted yarn for a pattern written for a sport yarn. Won't work unless you totally rewrite the pattern.
I would look for a different pattern written for a worsted yarn. I'm sure you will find something at lionbrand.com
Rewriting a pattern can be complicated unless you know how, and even when you do know how, it can get confusing. I know because I edit patterns often. Even if you sould get your guage small enough to accomodate your present pattern, the resulting fabric would be stiff and heavy.
I'm sure you'll find an appropriate pattern for your yarn with out much trouble if you just search a little.
Linda M>

volvo527 said:
Hi out there. I've recently returned to knitting after 30 years or more and need help with the gauge on my latest project. My yarn label for 4" is 17sts and 24 rows with size 8 needles. The pattern gauge is 24 sts and 32 rows with size 5 needles. The project is a child's sweater and the yarn is a 50/50 cotton acrylic bend. I've increased and decreased needle size but can't seem to arrive at the pattern gauge. Please tell me what to do. I'm in love with the yarn color and also the pattern and just want to start knitting. Thank you. Myrna.
:thumbup:
 

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The yarn called for and the yarn you want to use are vastly different in weight and therefore will be vastly different in gauge.

Using the pattern "as is" will result in a sweater that is either too large...or knit so tightly, you might find it very tedious.

I agree with Linda, try to find a similar pattern that calls for the weight yarn you have. You might try the website of the yarn company from the yarn you have.
 

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if you get the 1" gauge for your yarn, it would be 4 st and 6 rows with size 8 needles.
For the pattern it is 6 st and 8 rows with size 5 needles.
If you need to see it, knit the 1 ' gauge with # 8 and than with # 5 in a single test piece.

Double it to 2" test if you like!
 

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if you get the 1" gauge for your yarn, it would be 4 st and 6 rows with size 8 needles.
For the pattern it is 6 st and 8 rows with size 5 needles.
If you need to see it, knit the 1 ' gauge with # 8 and than with # 5 in a single test piece.

Double it to 2" test if you like!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You are a knitting engineer! I think I understand your directions but haven't tried them out just yet. I'll let you know. And you're right about my problem...it's really a converting gauge issue. I'll be sure to contact you if I need more explanation. Thanks so much. Myrna.
 

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Are you sure you're using the right weight yarn? The number sound like the yarn called for in the pattern is either sport or light dk weight or finer and the yarn you're trying to use is worsted weight.

If you are absolutely determined to use that yarn, try using the smaller needle size and knit tighter. Depending on what you're knitting, it may not look great with that tight a tension on the needle. If the pattern didn't specify the weight or used a yarn you aren't familiar with, my "rule of thumb" and it's very general is that 4-6 st. an in. is worsted weight, 6-9 st. is DK or light worsted weight, 10-15 is sport and fingering weight, and anything mofre than 15 per in. is fine cotton or sock/lace weight yarn. I know that's not very scientific or precise and it's based on my knitting style, but hopefully that helps.

Aluca
 
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