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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a question. I made some for a nephew, but they seem to leak a lot. I used the pattern from Piecework 2008 and used a classice superwash wool.

Should I try again with a different more absorbent wool? or a better pattern?
 

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Soakers are not meant to take the place of a diaper. Soakers go on over top of a cloth diaper. Once they are wet, you do have to remove and replace both the diaper and the soaker. The soaker is just an extra layer to keep the wet from going all over the place. They are not like plastic pants that will hold the liquid in. Years and years ago, there was no plastic pants to put on over the diaper and a soaker was used instead. They are only temporary things to use. You could put on the plastic pants and then the soaker over top to cover the plastic pants.
 

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Well, I just read about this in the book 'all new Homespun Handknit' (terrific book with patterns from Interweave) p.120, discribes a product called LANSINOH sold in drug stores for nursing mothers. you can use this to put back the heavy lanolin from wool to make the final knitted fabric completely water proof and urine proof. Info given along side a pattern for a babies soaker. Other products from specialty manufacturers can also be found as liquid lanolin or sprays to waterproof woolens. I'm sure most growers of sheep and spinners know about 'lanolinization', but I hadn't ever thought about it, and found this very interesting, natural way of waterproofing. Wouldn't this work great for mittens, and keep your hands soft.

You might research this a bit more. the article also said you have to use 100% wool not superwash or a blend. I would think that the lanolin could be found through any major supplier of knitting, or needlework.

Redkimba said:
I have a question. I made some for a nephew, but they seem to leak a lot. I used the pattern from Piecework 2008 and used a classice superwash wool.

Should I try again with a different more absorbent wool? or a better pattern?
 

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I remember reading something about this online. Superwash is not recommended for these because they leak. 100% wool is recommended instead. They need to be hand washed. A lanolin soak is used every so often. Check some of the diapering sites for new moms. I think I googled wool soakers or wool soaker knitting patterns. They should have some tips and care instructions for you.
 

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I am old enough to remember my mother using soakers on my baby sister. When I was in my LYS and they had pattern for soakers and that young mothers were actually knitting it came as quite a shock. Very dedicated mothers who are into all of the whole foods, going back to a purer way of doing things don't often get the whole picture. Having soiled soakers in wool is not a pretty picture. I can't imagine that this trend will last very long.
 

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DLB said:
I am old enough to remember my mother using soakers on my baby sister. When I was in my LYS and they had pattern for soakers and that young mothers were actually knitting it came as quite a shock. Very dedicated mothers who are into all of the whole foods, going back to a purer way of doing things don't often get the whole picture. Having soiled soakers in wool is not a pretty picture. I can't imagine that this trend will last very long.
A last, I think you might be right about that. But there's gotta be a bridge that can be built between Soakers, and Pampers the old, and new.
 

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I'm getting ready to do some soakers, but have looked at my granddaughter's current ones.

I've seen a number of patterns on Ravelry with a few that are felted. They do need to be knitted in wool with a snug stitch - I saw one style that had a pocket in it for an additional wool liner that I suspect may be of more use for night time or an older toddler.

Another option is PUL at the fabric store - I've seen it at Hobby Lobby and Joanne's and there is a book with sewing patterns. this has a coating on the fabric so it's similar to the old rubber pants, but not as stiff.
 

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In my opinion, I do think that soakers are a total impracticality for today. I had to use the good old fashioned flannel diapers for my son and washed them every two to three days. He was very allergic to any disposable diaper. I had no problems with leaks using the diapers and plastic pants, and nope, I never did stick my son with a diaper pin. lol
 

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Soakers are meant to be used over cloth diapers in the place of plastic pants. You need to "lanolinize' the soaker before it is used on baby. My DIL used cloth diapers and soakers on her babies. She loves it! Here are some instructions I copied from Wooly Wonder (www.woolywonder.com) on how to lanolinize them. My Current Machine Washing Method
Fill your machine with warm water on the hand wash setting. Add Eucalan or a similar wool wash. Toss in your soakers, inside out. Let ‘em soak for a few minutes while you get a glass jar and fill it with some of the warm wash water or retrieve your wool soap bar (LAMB, WOW, etc.).

Lanolin Users Only: Squeeze out an inch of lanolin from your lanolin tube and add it to the water. Nuke that water until it's HOT. Use oven mitts to remove the jar from the micro. Use a spoon to mix in the lanolin to the eucalan/water mixture. Stir until the melted lanolin is suspended in the mixture.

Fish your soakers/wool items to top of the washing machine surface. Carefully pour lanolin/water/eucalan mixture over the soaker, focusing on the important areas first, like the crotch. Proceed to pour it over as much of the soaker as you can.

LAMB/WOW users, rub your soap all over your soaker, focusing on the important areas. Let the machine agitate slightly, then leave it soaking for as long as you can. Overnight is awesome.

Let the water drain out and spin that soaker out.

Remove everything from the machine, reshape and lay flat to dry.
Freshies! Lanolizing Method

Squeeze 1/4 to 1/2 inch of tubed lanolin into a cup of HOTHOTHOT water (in a jar with a lid). Add a few drops of baby wash or Eucalan, cap it, and shake vigorously to emulsify. Pour over the wrap that is soaking in your sink/basin and squeeze a few times to distribute the lanolin mixture. Soak for 15 minutes or so, and then dry as above.

Don't put a uriney wool wrap in the diaper bucket. Even if it needs to be washed, let it dry out. Soaking in urine will leach out the color and cause bleeding onto your diapers.

Hope this helps you. Be sure to educate anyone who might be washing them on the proper way to care for them. Our son shrunk four soakers last year. LOLOL Now the girls have teddy bears in soakers too!
 

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Well, the first problem is the superwash wool. Soakers are intended to be knit big and felt down in use to make them less leaky. They are not waterproof, but they are intended to keep the baby warm when wet (wool doesn't get cold when it's wet, it retains heat), and to help prevent diaper rash which occurs when there is no air circulation as in plastic pants or disposeables. Superwash yarns don't felt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Wow - some good advice & some surprising "don't bother" advice.

I plan on re-trying with the same brand but "classic" wool. I will also check on ebay (thanks for the tip). :)
 
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