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I was told if you want a nice seam it is a good idea to crochet the seems together with an edge of single crochet. I like to have my knitting to projects to be finished off nicely and I've tried the different ways of joining seams and I don't always like the way it turns out. What are your opinions ?
 

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Personally, I don't like the bulk added when using single crochet to join pieces, even crocheted ones. UNLESS - it is a design feature of an afghan or something to have the ridge.

If I'm making a garment, the nicest finish is to use the mattress seam. Gives a nice flat appearance to the joins, yet enough of a seam allowance to give body to the join. Great for keeping the shape of the garment. :)
 

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I like to crochet knitted pieces together. I use the slip stitch. It doesn't leave the bulk in the seam like a single crochet. One does need to do the slip stitch loose enough as it doesn't have much if any stretch.
 

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How do your do the mattress stitch when closing the underneath of the are on a knit down sweater. Generally the sleeves are knitted horizonal and the body of the sweater is knitted vertical.
 

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guen12 said:
How do your do the mattress stitch when closing the underneath of the are on a knit down sweater. Generally the sleeves are knitted horizonal and the body of the sweater is knitted vertical.
For the under arm of the knit from the top sweater, I generally graft that area - you can search for how to do the "kitchener stitch" or grafting in knitting. That way, you don't have a bulk of a seam in that spot. :)
 

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Txlvs2knit said:
How do you do the mattress stitch when you want the purl side (or the bumpy side) of the stocking knit stitch to be the right side
Txlvs2knit, do you mean on a vertical (side) seam or on the shoulder seam? The 'face' of the garment, stockinette or reverse stockinette st, doesn't matter because you stretch the sts apart to see where to stitch.
The mattress seam is based on going under a particular number of rows (bars) in one 'channel' between sts, usually 1 st in from the edge, and going back into that SAME hole when you sew on that side again. Thats what draws the two sides together without puckering.
Choosing to go under 1 bar or 2 bars on each side is a choice depending in the weight of the yarn used: a heavier yarn like worsted and some fuzzy DKs would be one bar on each side, fingering, sport and some DKs would be under 2 bars.

The shoulder seam would still use the same method—under the same number of bars on both sides and always back into the same hole you came out of on each side. But many people alse choose to use the Kitchener style there to drop the seamline over the shoulder. The Kitchener would make a looser seam here than the mattress st so the choice would be made depending on what type of seam is needed across the neck-to-arm.
 
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