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you've found the right place for answers to questions. The folks on this forum are very knowledgeable and friendly and welcome us newbies or return to knitting/crochetting .
I've learned quite a bit here. :) Welcome to the forum.
 

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Strega said:
:wink:

Hi All! I am "Strega" and live in Farmington, NY. I am trying to get back to knitting and crocheting after many years. Forgive my ingorance, but what does DK, DK yarn and Aran mean?

Also, what is the trick of using two yarns at once?

Thanks for any help you can give me.
Some more information. On a yarn skein [if they use the yarn standards] DK will be a #3, WW [ and aran ] is a #4. Here is a web site that has this and other helpful information and some free patterns http://www.craftyarncouncil.com/

You can hold 2 yarns together for either knitting or crocheting - it isn't hard, but make take a bit of getting used to: remember that 2 yarns will increase the yarn weight, hence the needle size and change the gauge. I often use 2 WW[#4] for Bulky patterns - gives a nice tweedy effect if they are different colors.
 

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D and K mean Double Knitting. There is a knitting technique called double knitting. It is confusing that DK is also weight of yarn, heavier than Sport but lighter than Worsted here in the US. However it gets more confusing because there is no world-wide standard for these terms. Since we have the internet and can order yarn from all over the world, DK in one place may not match DK in another. I can also vary by manufacturer. I have noticed that Colourmart yarns (headquartered in London) are thinner than similarly labeled yarns here. What I do is look at the number of yards per 50 gm. ball. I look at the specs of the yarn recommended in the pattern and then substitute yarns that have a similar number of yards per 50 gm. I have seen DK applied to yarns from 105 yards to 270 yards per 50 gms. The more yards per gram, the thinner the yarn. You don't have to match exactly but you want to be in the ball park or your gauge will be very off. Worsted is often applied up to 120 yards. So you will see overlap.

Bonnie
 

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FireballDave said:
Strega said:
Do we know what the "D" and the "K" stand for?

I think it's fascinating how something as seemlingly mundane as the changing thickness of knitting yarns can reflect social and economic history. I'm a bit strange that way, I like to explore these things.

Dave
Thank you Strega for asking this question, I have wondered myself, and thank you Dave for such an interesting comment! I don't think your explorations strange at all, we all have our informational quirks and this bit you have stored is very clarifying!

Lesa
 

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Welcome to the forum, Strega. D= double K= knit or knitting.
As for the holding two strands together, you do exactly that. Hold the two strands together as one yarn, and knit with it as if it was one yarn.
 

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Strega said:
Do we know what the "D" and the "K" stand for?
Yes - double knitting. It came about because way back when, a lot of yarn was only available in fingering weight (think thin, like for socks or baby yarns) and in order to make a sweater or such, instead of knitting on tiny needles forever, many people began doubling the thinner yarns - double knitting.

Double knitting can also mean a knitting technique using two different strands of yarn to create a double thick or double sided picture on an item. Sometimes done using slipped stitches, sometimes done by alternating strands of yarn across a row.

Aran, btw, can mean either the weight of yarn, or a stitch pattern, or even an off-white colouring. Very confusing....

:)
 
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