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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Regarding pattern instruction that says slip first stitch for a nice edge (particular for scarfs, etc.), does that literally mean to simply slip the first stitch on the row (as though knitting it) from left to right needle and continue the pattern on the second stitch on?

I think so, but want to be sure. It looks odd when I do it....
 

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thats it. slip it as if you are knitting it. I now use this method and it really does help to make a nicer edge. kind of like a salvage edge on material.
 

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(((((((((( You slip as if to purl unless the pattern directs you to do otherwise.

Slipping purlwise turns the edge a certin way - either CW or CCW - and slipping as if to knit or purl leaves that first edge stitch with the two loops on the side, thus it is easier to see what to seam into and makes a neater edge/seam.

So, slip as if to purl unless directed otherwise. (Enter stitch from the right.......aka; back of the stitch).

Donna Rae
Brandon, Iowaa ))))))))

as if to knit will do the converse. This elimates the bumps ma
Claire said:
Regarding pattern instruction that says slip first stitch for a nice edge (particular for scarfs, etc.), does that literally mean to simply slip the first stitch on the row (as though knitting it) from left to right needle and continue the pattern on the second stitch on?

I think so, but want to be sure. It looks odd when I do it....
 

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It makes for a lovely "edge" that doesn't roll. I made an interesting sleeveless top that used the slip stitch edge along the armholes, rather than adding a "band" (which never seems very complimentary to shoulders). I fell in love with that edge ever since!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ah, it helps with rolling, too, which is always annoying...

If you did a scarf that is mainly stockinette, and put this edge on it, would it still roll?
 

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((((((( Yes......even with just a few border stitches (5?), stockinette will most likely roll....I see this hailed in many times from my contacts.

Other options would be to:
Basket weave after the edge of your choice. Google basketweave knit scarf pattern. It can be used, too on dishcloths (cotton).

Garter stitch center with seed stitch borders - five stitches. Anything but stockinette.

Border of choice and make it a sampler of stitches you know for the center. Google for ADVANCED knitting stitches. The raspberry stitch scarf requires few edge stitches; Lots of turning, though t accomplish this sticth but you don't have to use it a lot. Knit for a few rows, raspberry for a few rows, Knit for a few rows, etc.

Donna Rae
Brandon, Iowa))))))))))))

If you did a scarf that is mainly stockinette, and put this edge on it, would it still roll?[/quote]
 

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I just discovered what a nice edge this makes and have started adding an extra stitch to patterns just so I can have the selvage. You just transfer the last slip, which had just been knitted or purled on the previous row, onto your needle at the beginning of the row. Really pretty and so easy to pick up if the stitch slips off the needle, even if it goes down a few rows...just get your crochet hook and make a ladder back up.
 

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I am getting ready to start my first ever sweater. Would slipping the first stitch at the beginning of each row work even though the pattern doesn't call for it. On hats and slippers I have made the edges that have to be stitched together always look rather messy and are really hard to join neatly. I knit socks and I love how the heel flap edges look so neat.
 

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Usually, slip whatever the work is: for K, slip as if to knit; for P, slip as if to P.

You can do this with garter st, too! It makes a nice, beaded looking edge. Just slip as if to K the first st of ea row.
 

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unfortunately, one is very limited with basketweave and garter stitch patterns. The rolling of scarves is also prevalent I find when doing cables or even lace patterns.

I would think that doing reversible patterns would give you more pattern options. I did a ribbed pattern narrow scarf this past month which holds itself flat. There is a great range of ribbing patterns to test ones creativity. And reverse cable patterns intrigue me especially since you can view the scarf from either side.
 

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That's exactly what it means. Of course when you work the next row, that slipped stitch will get worked. Then again, you will slip it again at the beginnning of the next row. Your instinct was correct.
 

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I use this technique on 99% of every one of my projects. It makes an absolutely beautiful edge. You can leave it the way it is or it makes it easier to pick up stitches along it, crochet an edge on to it and/or have a much easier time seaming your pieces together. Sometimes, if the pattern I am doing 'forces' me to use the 1st stitch as called for, I will add one extra stitch on each edge to allow me to use the slip technique. I will then slip the 1st stitch & purl the very last stitch, again causing the edge to be smooth & straight. You will have to get used to doing this but, once you do, you will do it automatically. Happy Knitting!!!
Sheryl
 
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