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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there -
does anyone know how to repair a cashemere sweather that has a hole on one side? I must have snagged it, It has been suggested to embroider the area, but it would look strange due to it' s location, another suggested embridering the entire edge all around..... Any other ideas?
all suggestions are welcomed.

Thanks
Luciana
 

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lucianaq said:
Hi there -
does anyone know how to repair a cashemere sweather that has a hole on one side? I must have snagged it, It has been suggested to embroider the area, but it would look strange due to it' s location, another suggested embridering the entire edge all around..... Any other ideas?
all suggestions are welcomed.

Thanks
Luciana
You might be able to do a duplicate stitch and just make a tiny area, a blossom or a leaf, wend its way over from the properly placed main design....OR.... get some other yarn in the same color (you want it to look like you planned a different texture, not that you couldn't match your cashmere) or even better, 2 or 3 other yarns in the best match you can find, and remember for these kinds of things, tone is important, shade is not...if the tones are all the same, it will all go together and just look richer for the combination. Anyway, then you can either embroider a larger area, or make some crocheted motifs (scrumbing is all the rage right now) and place them here and there, making sure one of the smaller ones is coming out of a seam to cover your problem... if the motif goes under your arm or into the side seam, doesn't matter, get that covered and then play with the other motifs to balance overall. this could be a great re-design... and tone on tone is always classy looking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great idea, thank-you, now I will see if I can combine the suggestions, all great so far.
Appreciate the input, you all are brilliant and obviously experirnced knitter.
Many thanks, I am saving all the suggestions!!
Happy New Year!
Luciana
 

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deemail said:
lucianaq said:
Hi there -
does anyone know how to repair a cashemere sweather that has a hole on one side? I must have snagged it, It has been suggested to embroider the area, but it would look strange due to it' s location, another suggested embridering the entire edge all around..... Any other ideas?
all suggestions are welcomed.

Thanks
Luciana
You might be able to do a duplicate stitch and just make a tiny area, a blossom or a leaf, wend its way over from the properly placed main design....OR.... get some other yarn in the same color (you want it to look like you planned a different texture, not that you couldn't match your cashmere) or even better, 2 or 3 other yarns in the best match you can find, and remember for these kinds of things, tone is important, shade is not...if the tones are all the same, it will all go together and just look richer for the combination. Anyway, then you can either embroider a larger area, or make some crocheted motifs (scrumbing is all the rage right now) and place them here and there, making sure one of the smaller ones is coming out of a seam to cover your problem... if the motif goes under your arm or into the side seam, doesn't matter, get that covered and then play with the other motifs to balance overall. this could be a great re-design... and tone on tone is always classy looking.
Is there an easy way for me to learn the difference between "tone" and "shade"? This really floored me when I read it!
thanks!!!! (I hope ^_^)
 

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Shade refers to the actual colour, tone to the relative darkness/lightness of the colour. For example, consider how a bright red would differ if mixed with a little white or with a little black - still red (shade), but different tones.
 

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ryr said:
deemail said:
lucianaq said:
Hi there -does anyone know how to repair a cashemere sweather that has a hole on one side? I must have snagged it, It has been suggested to embroider the area, but it would look strange due to it' s location, another suggested embridering the entire edge all around..... Any other ideas?
all suggestions are welcomed. Thanks Luciana
You might be able to do a duplicate stitch and just make a tiny area, a blossom or a leaf, wend its way over from the properly placed main design....OR.... get some other yarn in the same color (you want it to look like you planned a different texture, not that you couldn't match your cashmere) or even better, 2 or 3 other yarns in the best match you can find, and remember for these kinds of things, tone is important, shade is not...if the tones are all the same, it will all go together and just look richer for the combination. Anyway, then you can either embroider a larger area, or make some crocheted motifs (scrumbing is all the rage right now) and place them here and there, making sure one of the smaller ones is coming out of a seam to cover your problem... if the motif goes under your arm or into the side seam, doesn't matter, get that covered and then play with the other motifs to balance overall. this could be a great re-design... and tone on tone is always classy looking.
Is there an easy way for me to learn the difference between "tone" and "shade"? This really floored me when I read it!
thanks!!!! (I hope
http://soeasyquilts.blogspot.com/2009/09/tints-shades-and-tones.html

I like this definition and use it to refer to when i'm lost... and of course, i didn't even mention 'tint'.... this site explains all three really clearly... for me, the easiest one to see and understand is green... did you ever see greens that just looked 'sick' together? that's because some of them are 'yellow greens' and some of them are 'blue greens'.... while i love both, i do NOT want them together... I lose all pattern, scale, and design when i look at a quilt block (or sweater) with them together...all i can see is the two greens making each other look awful...
 

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If the hole is the result of a pulled thread, i.e.along a row if stitches, you should be to obtain enough of the yarn even if you have to pull a bit more. On wrong side oversew through matching stitches from below and above. Even of you have to slightly gather the knitting it will make the least noticable mend.
 

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It would help to see a picture of the problem area.

If the yarn is not actually broken creating a tear with a unraveled stitches, a very fine crochet hook can be used to "pick" the pulled yarn back into place. It takes patience but I have done it. Just pulling the dangling thread to the back leaves a hole and resorting to other methods is another alternative but I would try reworking it back into place first.

A friend who enjoys fine quality cashmere and will wear her expensive sweaters for years had told me about how the elbows had worn very thin from working at her desk. I suggested a fine quality leather patch. After she was snubbed at her local yarn shop, she looked into her own stock of fabrics(she runs a designer shop that sells furnishings and bolts of decorator fabrics)and found a nice quality piece of synthetic suede which was light weight, the right complimentary tone, really soft and blended with the cashmere very well and not at all bulky which leather can be. After neatly sewing patches on the elbows it really looked professional and she will probably wear the sweater indefinitely. Plus she can still hand wash the sweater without worrying about leather.
 

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Elis said:
If the hole is the result of a pulled thread, i.e.along a row if stitches, you should be to obtain enough of the yarn even if you have to pull a bit more. On wrong side oversew through matching stitches from below and above. Even of you have to slightly gather the knitting it will make the least noticable mend.
Good idea. If you can repair it instead of resorting to camouflage you would actually wear the sweater again. Without having seen your sweater and even if it is of finer knit, as knitters we can "fix" anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It is an actual tear in the yarn so no way to pick up and repair that way.
I think embroidery will have to be the way to go, I will stay with black textures, and take my time to do it: I plan to wear this for a log time, so I appreciate everyone 's suggestions.
I will remember the elbow patch trick too just in case for other knittied items, I have a jacket w/ patches, but I can see where the right soft patch could work on a knit as well.
Happy new year all and thank-you.
Luciana
 

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Thank you for the websites on scrumbing. The pictures were awesome. I can't wait to try it but I'm not very creative. I can follow most patterns but this should be fun to try. Like everyone else, I have plenty of different yarns to make this interesting!
 

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Years ago quality sweaters came with a small amount of yarn for repairs. I don't know if that is still the case. Drawing the hole closed and preventing stitches from running is the first order of business. Hiding the repair with duplicate stitching is second.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Right, they still come with extra yarn and even buttons when you buy expensive knitted items, especially at upscale stores like Neiman Marcus, L Taylor, Norstrum, etc.
And stopping the hole from getting bigger is important, thanks for pointing that out.
 

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It's not as daunting of a task as you would think. Duplicate stitch is nothing more than "mock knitting".

Years and years ago, my late sister was taking a "modern dance" class and insisted on ironing her leotard..with disastrous results...a hole burned in the hip area. As I stitched around the hole to keep "runners" from occurring, mom ran to the local sewing store and found "geese" to stitch over the hole. My sister was just hysterical..but come home from school the next day telling us she was the envy of her class for her "unique" leotard!

I don't think my sister touched an iron again in her life, after that!
 
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