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Any slip stitch (colorwork) knitters on forum? I'm thinking of buying a how-to book (easy). TY!!

DRM
 

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I just took a great slip stitch knitting class from Melissa Leapman at Stitches West. She has a couple of great color books out; just look her up on Amazon. If you ever have the chance to take her class at one of the Stitches events, she is a great teacher; she says her books are written like she teaches her classes. Good luck!
 

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I have done slip stitch for heels on socks. There should be a tutorial on youtube for the technique. I just followed the instructions that came with a pattern I found on Ravelry initially. Its not so difficult, really. It boiled down to slipping 1 stitch from the left needle to the right needle purlwise, every other stitch. (i.e. knit 1 stitch, slip the next, knit 1 stitch, then slip the next across the row.) This would be row 1. The next row is purled in all the stitches (row 2). Then, with row 3, the stitch that had been slipped in the first row is knitted and the knitted stitch in row 1 is slipped purlwise, continuing in the alternating pattern of slip 1, knit 1, slip 1, knit 1. Row 4 is then purled through all the stitches. Repeating these 4 rows as many times as you desire for the project requirements. I believe this may be called an eye of partridge heel pattern. Here is a google page that may help. http://www.google.com/search?q=partridge+slip+stitch+pattern&rls=com.microsoft:en-us:IE-SearchBox&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&sourceid=ie7&rlz=1I7ADFA_en
 

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e.ridenh said:
Any slip stitch (colorwork) knitters on forum? I'm thinking of buying a how-to book (easy). TY!!

DRM
I have done some. I made a hat of old stash to learn. It was from a simple pattern in Creative Knitting magazine a few years back. It is easier than stranded knitting, but that isn't that hard either, just takes more practice. Especially if you start on the smaller projects. I got interested in slip stitch from reading a library book.
Another colorwork technique that gave beautiful results was a free pattern from knittingpatterncentral called kathleens faux isle. You use a variegated or self striping yarn for the pattern stitches.
 

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The technique is called Mosaic knitting. It creates something similar to a Fair Isles look without carrying strands in the back of the work. It's great for afghan blocks since there are no strands to snag. If you can follow a chart, and remember to slip the correct way, it's very easy. Works best with only two colors at a time.
 

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I made several hats the slip stitch way. I have no idea where I got the pattern. It had several patterns in differenct color combos over the entire hat. It was super easy and really looks impressive. I made the hats for my 2 grandsons and them added a portion of the pattern across the sweater at chest height. You can even do it on circular needles because you only use 2 colors at a time and both strands go all around the sweater. Knowing how creative you are I would guess it would be no time before you will be making up your own designes.
 

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google: mosaic knitting

It's an easy way to get an effect that looks like Fair Isle without carrying the strands in back. Thus, it is very good for anything you would not want long strands on the back, like an afghan, or for lightweight knitting, like summer weight.
 

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Let's try this again: It is almost always used with 2 colors. It is not called slip stitch knitting. It is Mosaic knitting. Don't ask me why, I guess someone thought it resembled mosaic tile designs. It is a quick, easy and inexpensive substitute for Fair Isle knitting (also called stranded knitting). It is often used when strands of yarn are not wanted dangling on the back of the fabric, like an afghan.
 
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