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I've made quite a few sweaters but they've all been seamless, top down raglans. This one will have to be seamed. I have read a few things on this subject but it's more meaningful to hear from those of you who have been doing this for some time. I am hoping that lots of you will tell me your favorite way of seaming and why it's your favorite way. If there are different techniques to use for different areas I hope you'll include that also. Looking forward to learning from you. Thank you.
 

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When I seam a sweater, I put two extra stitches on either side of all the pieces to be sewn together called selvage stitches, which are the equivalent of a seam allowance in regular sewing of woven garments. The first selvage stitch on each row should be slipped, not knitted or purled, in such a way that you get a neat chain up both sides of the piece that will be easy to mattress stitch together.
Also, the two knitted seam allowances ensure that if you are knitting a pattern, that pattern does not get turned under.
 

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My go-to seam is definitely the mattress stitch. Done correctly, it is almost invisible, particularly on vertical seams. It is also excellent for shoulder seams and even vertical-to-horizontal.
 

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Micromegas said:
When I seam a sweater, I put two extra stitches on either side of all the pieces to be sewn together called selvage stitches, which are the equivalent of a seam allowance in regular sewing of woven garments. The first selvage stitch on each row should be slipped, not knitted or purled, in such a way that you get a neat chain up both sides of the piece that will be easy to mattress stitch together.
Good patterns have selvedge stitches built in. You do not add them yourself.
Which sweater are you planning to knit?
 

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If you like the sweaters you knit top down that are seamless, then why not knit a bottom up sweater seamless? You don’t need to find a different pattern than the one you have, just adjust it. Add all stitches of front(s) and back and bands and cast on. Knit to armhole. Knit sleeves in the round, making one increase before marker and one after. Depending on the raglan shaping you may be able to add the sleeves and finish the sweater top in the round or flat. There are patterns for this, maybe finding one for instructions only might help. Sorry I have seen them but never kept any as I have been doing this since before internet.
 

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MMWRay said:
Good patterns have selvedge stitches built in. You do not add them yourself.
Which sweater are you planning to knit?
Right now, none. Too many knitted patterns do not include a seam allowance. That's why it's good to buy books on knitting/crochet tips and tricks as well as knitting/crochet project books.
 

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Micromegas said:
Right now, none. Too many knitted patterns do not include a seam allowance. That's why it's good to buy books on knitting/crochet tips and tricks as well as knitting/crochet project books.
Like I said 'good' patterns have selvedge stitches built in. Look for the info in the pattern. Also schematics of the sweater design are included in 'good' patterns.
 

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deenashoemaker said:
I prefer the bickford method. Easy and looks very nice.
I agree with you, every other stitch in knitting is joined to another with a single stand, so should the seams be.
There is no need for a "seam allowance" as you are not working with cut fabric as you do in sewing. I've never had my Bickford seams droop or stretch.
 

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Overcasting for seaming is actually the very easiest method. It is perfect for fitting set in sleeves as it is not bulky and doesn’t leave a seam. Especially good for heavier yarns. With sport weight and finer I use the mattress stitch. Also I recommend checking out 10rowsaday.com for extremely clear video and written descriptions of any technique.
 
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