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shebaker1 said:
When a pattern calls for sock yarn is it any sock yarn? Is one sock yarn the same as the next except for the material it is made of??
Thanks,
Rebecca
good question. i will look forward to more responses on this.
 

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Not an expert on socks but have read on here that there should be about 20 to 25% nylon in the yarn. I've done one pair in regular nylon/wool sock yarn, forget the brand, and am now working on second pair in Paton's stretch sock yarn, a cotton/wool/nylon/something else yarn. I've enjoyed working with both yarns but know many don't like Paton's stretch, which is now discontinued but available on line at times.

Many years ago I made knee-high socks for my daughter who had matchstick legs and they all wore well but then she only wore them a couple years before she outgrew them. This yarn was synthetic, for the most part, and I didn't know about the nylon bit.

I've also made other things with sock yarn and then the nylon doesn't matter. Oh, and they've been fairly uniform about not liking all cotton for socks, can't remember why.
 

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shebaker1 said:
When a pattern calls for sock yarn is it any sock yarn? Is one sock yarn the same as the next except for the material it is made of??
Thanks,
Rebecca
Rebecca, sock yarn is usually wool with some nylon for durability, in fingering weight.
But socks can be knitted with other fibers, too, as well as other weights of yarn. I am not the best one to answer, because although I've knitted quite a few socks in the past, I haven't kept up with the new sock yarns. But others on KP have a great deal of knowledge in this area. Wait a while and they will help you.
Socks made of cotton tend to stretch out of shape. Who wants a sock flopping around the ankles? There are some yarns that have cotton in them, and they may work better than all cotton.
You can also look up some sock knitting web sites and blogs and see what you can find. Quite a few books on sock knitting as well.
 

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If the pattern calls for sock yarn and you are not making socks then nylon is not required. Sometimes sock yarn just refers to the weight of the yarn and not the content.
 

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I use a lot of sock yarn (fingering weight) not only for socks but for shawls, scarves, hats & baby items. What I'm knitting will determine fiber content.
 

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As others have pointed out, "sock yarn" is a label of convenience, usually (but not always) indicating yarn that is blended with a bit of reinforcing yarn (usually nylon/polyamide) for strength. It can range from light fingering all the way up to sport, although most is the equivalent of fingering. Many - and again not all sock yarns - are "easy care" and are superwash/machine washable. All however benefit from avoiding the dryer all together regardless of how they are labeled, and will last longer if hand washed.

If you have a sock pattern that calls for generic sock yarn, you can usually use any of the widely available and well known offerings - Kroy Sock, the Regia family, Opal, Cascade Heritage, Lang Jawoll, Berroco Sox, and the like. These standard 4-ply equivalent yarns (a weight descriptor, not a count of actual constituent plies) tend to have 20-25% nylon, are superwash, and come in at around 440 yards per 100g (one 100g ball will make mid-height ankle/crew socks for up to women's shoe size 11 US/43 european, a second ball may be needed if knitting women's knee socks, or men's shoe size 10 or above).

Other sock yarns can certainly be used, but more attention should be paid to gauge because some yarns are heavier or lighter than the average examples listed above.

Also, as a final note of warning - I have knit socks from non-reinforced yarns. They do wear out much more quickly, and in the case of soft yarns like 100% merino wool - much more quickly. Save those precious fingering weight yarns for scarves, mittens and hats. Spare yourself the heartbreak of socks that hole out after two wearings (been there, still have the destroyed pair at the back of the drawer...)

Hope this helps, -K.
 

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The subject said "sick yarn"--had to find out what that was!
As for sock yarn, it's my favorite weight to work with, and I love Madeline Tosh and Louet all merino yarns best. I make socks, shawls, and baby items.
 

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shebaker1 said:
When a pattern calls for sock yarn is it any sock yarn? Is one sock yarn the same as the next except for the material it is made of??
Thanks,
Rebecca
If durability is a requirement.... be sure to have a "sock yarn" that has about 20% nylon. If weight is the requirement... fingering weight is typical for "sock yarn"
 

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kbsalazar said:
. Many - and again not all sock yarns - are "easy care" and are superwash/machine washable. All however benefit from avoiding the dryer all together regardless of how they are labeled, and will last longer if hand washed.

Hope this helps, -K.
Does avoiding the dryer apply to sock yarns that are wool-free?
 

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Must admit I pulled this up to read, originally, because of the title. Really glad the OP made a typo because otherwise I might not have read it. Thanks for starting a fun, informative read.
 
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