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Greyhounds are not naturally active dogs, like a Jack Russell. People think because they're racers they need a lot of exercise, but the truth is that they are the most couch lovers of all the couch potato loving dogs. They are great for apartments and while some are prone to play, most would rather find a soft comfy place and lie down to snooze. I've had several and love the greyhound.

Most come from racing tracks and if not adopted are often slaughtered. Many racing tracks contact greyhound rescue groups to take them before any action is taken once they are finished racing. They are so affectionate and laid back. You can fit many greyhounds into a small space and they would be quite happy. There are many cousin breeds that feel the same way.

Greyhounds come in different sizes, too, although I wouldn't call any small - other than the Whippet or Miniature, which are supposed to be small. Look them up! who knows - you may be a Greyhound parent and not know it.

A greyhound puppy, while so cute, is a "Dennis the Menace" and unless you like training, get a grown up retired racer. The puppies are horribly active and extremely mischievous until they reach their teenage years (in dog years), and you usually can't get them from a racing establishment....only from a breeder. You must have the patience of Job to tackle a greyhound puppy.

Please, look at the Greyhound rescues. They are waiting just for you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
KnitPicker said:
Greyhounds are not naturally active dogs, like a Jack Russell. People think because they're racers they need a lot of exercise, but the truth is that they are the most couch lovers of all the couch potato loving dogs. They are great for apartments and while some are prone to play, most would rather find a soft comfy place and lie down to snooze. I've had several and love the greyhound.

Most come from racing tracks and if not adopted are often slaughtered. Many racing tracks contact greyhound rescue groups to take them before any action is taken once they are finished racing. They are so affectionate and laid back. You can fit many greyhounds into a small space and they would be quite happy. There are many cousin breeds that feel the same way.

Greyhounds come in different sizes, too, although I wouldn't call any small - other than the Whippet or Miniature, which are supposed to be small. Look them up! who knows - you may be a Greyhound parent and not know it.

A greyhound puppy, while so cute, is a "Dennis the Menace" and unless you like training, get a grown up retired racer. The puppies are horribly active and extremely mischievous until they reach their teenage years (in dog years), and you usually can't get them from a racing establishment....only from a breeder. You must have the patience of Job to tackle a greyhound puppy.

Please, look at the Greyhound rescues. They are waiting just for you!
Question: what are the prices on these animals?
 

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Please, look at the Greyhound rescues. They are waiting just for you![/quote]

Question: what are the prices on these animals?[/quote]

You would need to talk directly with a greyhound rescue group as each sets their own prices. I get mine practically free - I wait until "Senior Month" with my rescue group (Dallas, TX) and at that time they offer seniors who have been with them for a very long time and haven't been adopted free to homes who have adopted previously with them. Mainly because we're a "qualified home" already. But they are always looking for new good loving homes for the dogs.

They have many specials during the year where they lower prices - for instance, a greyhound who is 6 (or in some cases 7 y/o) is considered a senior, so they will cost less than a greyhound who is younger. Some rescues distinguish between female and male on their rates, and other criteria can decide their rates.

Do a search for greyhound rescues in or near your location. Ask about "specials". These rescue groups are usually very reputable and their only purpose for existence is to save these dogs from being killed and to find "forever homes" for them. I can't wait to get another one.

Don't rule out your city's animal services dept (dog pound). They sometimes get greyhounds or greyhound mixes (which have the greyhound mentality of "couch first, exercise second').

When I first got mine, I paid about $125 for my male - that meant all his shots were paid for and up to date, he was in good health, his vet records were given to me, and he was neutered already, plus he came with collar (ad sometimes a favorite toy) and tags, as well as he was tested to see if he got along with children, cats and would fit into a family well. Some rescues today will even microchip him and the cost is included in the cost of the dog. The cost for doing this was more than the $125, so I didn't mind paying it at all. Plus, think of all the expenses they went to for rescuing these dogs - food, vet bills, training, adjusting the dog, etc.

My female came straight from the race track to the rescue, then to me. She'd never seen a TV before among other firsts for her. It was so funny to see her walk into the room the first time and see the TV screen. She ran up to it, cocking her head back and forth with ears up and whining a bit - the TV show was a pet show with the dogs barking. It was so funny. She quickly adjusted and we had a very special relationship between us. I called her Corianne.

In the Dallas, TX area I go to Greyhound Rescue Society of Texas, dba "Greyhounds Unlimited". I think you can find them under "Greyhounds Unlimited" or GU online. I send all my questions to [email protected] They may be able to recommend a rescue in your area. They are the nicest ones. There is another greyhound rescue called GALT, and I got my female grey from them.

Hope you get one! The dogs are a fantastic family breed. I got my two when they were 7 yr old and they lived to 15 - extraordinarily long for a large dog, but that's what love will do! The dogs respond so wonderfully to all the love we give them. Best blessings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
KnitPicker said:
Please, look at the Greyhound rescues. They are waiting just for you!
Question: what are the prices on these animals?[/quote]

You would need to talk directly with a greyhound rescue group as each sets their own prices. I get mine practically free - I wait until "Senior Month" with my rescue group (Dallas, TX) and at that time they offer seniors who have been with them for a very long time and haven't been adopted free to homes who have adopted previously with them. Mainly because we're a "qualified home" already. But they are always looking for new good loving homes for the dogs.

They have many specials during the year where they lower prices - for instance, a greyhound who is 6 (or in some cases 7 y/o) is considered a senior, so they will cost less than a greyhound who is younger. Some rescues distinguish between female and male on their rates, and other criteria can decide their rates.

Do a search for greyhound rescues in or near your location. Ask about "specials". These rescue groups are usually very reputable and their only purpose for existence is to save these dogs from being killed and to find "forever homes" for them. I can't wait to get another one.

Don't rule out your city's animal services dept (dog pound). They sometimes get greyhounds or greyhound mixes (which have the greyhound mentality of "couch first, exercise second').

When I first got mine, I paid about $125 for my male - that meant all his shots were paid for and up to date, he was in good health, his vet records were given to me, and he was neutered already, plus he came with collar (ad sometimes a favorite toy) and tags, as well as he was tested to see if he got along with children, cats and would fit into a family well. Some rescues today will even microchip him and the cost is included in the cost of the dog. The cost for doing this was more than the $125, so I didn't mind paying it at all. Plus, think of all the expenses they went to for rescuing these dogs - food, vet bills, training, adjusting the dog, etc.

My female came straight from the race track to the rescue, then to me. She'd never seen a TV before among other firsts for her. It was so funny to see her walk into the room the first time and see the TV screen. She ran up to it, cocking her head back and forth with ears up and whining a bit - the TV show was a pet show with the dogs barking. It was so funny. She quickly adjusted and we had a very special relationship between us. I called her Corianne.

In the Dallas, TX area I go to Greyhound Rescue Society of Texas, dba "Greyhounds Unlimited". I think you can find them under "Greyhounds Unlimited" or GU online. I send all my questions to [email protected] They may be able to recommend a rescue in your area. They are the nicest ones. There is another greyhound rescue called GALT, and I got my female grey from them.

Hope you get one! The dogs are a fantastic family breed. I got my two when they were 7 yr old and they lived to 15 - extraordinarily long for a large dog, but that's what love will do! The dogs respond so wonderfully to all the love we give them. Best blessings.[/quote]

Thanks for the info. I am first going to get my fence put up its a big yard..we are in the country and losts of space to run for them. I am looking to get at least two. If I had my way I'd be taking them all. But fencing first.
 

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Do you provide foster care for them until adoption? Brother and sister-in-law had wonderful "Norman" for about 7 years. He was happiest resting on his blanket. We have a priceless photo of him laying near fireplace wearing a NY Giants hat. He was a gentle giant and loved by his family! Upstate NY has some great rescue services-Greyhounds as Companions is one that visits our farmers market during the summer months.
 

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nitnurse said:
I love the way the black one towards the bottom of the picture is laying. How can that be comfy? :lol:
looks uncomfortable to me too but our anatolian shepherd does it all the time. wish i was that flexible.
 

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eneurian said:
nitnurse said:
I love the way the black one towards the bottom of the picture is laying. How can that be comfy? :lol:
looks uncomfortable to me too but our anatolian shepherd does it all the time. wish i was that flexible.
Natural position for a greyhound! They don't have all that fat on their body to restrict movement. LOL
 
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