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There have been many threads here where knitters wind up complaining that their socks don't fit properly, usually too long or short. I will tell how I teach my students. This might not solve every issue but it should help.
Get a single skein of variegated but light color yarn (variegated makes it easier to count rounds) in the weight you want for the majority of your socks and a basic pattern, simple stockinette foot, ribbed cuff. Toe up or cuff down does not matter. Follow the pattern and for the length err on the side of too long if there is a question. This ONE sock is your model, similar to a sloper in sewing. You can mark with colored thread the last increase round (toe up) at the toe, the first round for the heel, etc. any place the pattern changes.
When it's finished and tried on it's a simple thing to check for fit in length, diameter, and toe length. Fits but the toe is too snug? Place increase rounds closer together. Too much wiggle room in toe? Add a few rounds between increase rounds. Heel placement is easier, increase or decrease rounds between heel and toe. Ankle fits but foot is too loose? It's easy to count how many stitches need to be reduced (this is why it's better to err on the side of too large).
Make a note of what needle size you used, the gauge, and any changes needed and either stitch or safety pin the note to the cuff of the sock and then place in a Ziploc bag with your sock yarn.
The next time you want to knit socks you have what you need to knit the perfect fit. Even if you want to use a different gauge or heel or toe, all you have to do is compare to your model and count.
If your feet have more than a slight difference (my one ankle is larger from surgeries) put those changes in your note.
Every few years you might want to try on the model again as our feet change over the years.
 

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There have been many threads here where knitters wind up complaining that their socks don't fit properly, usually too long or short. I will tell how I teach my students. This might not solve every issue but it should help.
Get a single skein of variegated but light color yarn (variegated makes it easier to count rounds) in the weight you want for the majority of your socks and a basic pattern, simple stockinette foot, ribbed cuff. Toe up or cuff down does not matter. Follow the pattern and for the length err on the side of too long if there is a question. This ONE sock is your model, similar to a sloper in sewing. You can mark with colored thread the last increase round (toe up) at the toe, the first round for the heel, etc. any place the pattern changes.
When it's finished and tried on it's a simple thing to check for fit in length, diameter, and toe length. Fits but the toe is too snug? Place increase rounds closer together. Too much wiggle room in toe? Add a few rounds between increase rounds. Heel placement is easier, increase or decrease rounds between heel and toe. Ankle fits but foot is too loose? It's easy to count how many stitches need to be reduced (this is why it's better to err on the side of too large).
Make a note of what needle size you used, the gauge, and any changes needed and either stitch or safety pin the note to the cuff of the sock and then place in a Ziploc bag with your sock yarn.
The next time you want to knit socks you have what you need to knit the perfect fit. Even if you want to use a different gauge or heel or toe, all you have to do is compare to your model and count.
If your feet have more than a slight difference (my one ankle is larger from surgeries) put those changes in your note.
Every few years you might want to try on the model again as our feet change over the years.
This is an excellent hint. It is also a great opportunity to try out a new heel technique before committing it to a regular pair of socks.
 

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I'm sure that works but it's too complicated for me. I do two at a time, toe up knit to fit ... try it on, it's not rocket science ... and have no idea how many rounds I knit between toe increases and gusset increases or starting a short row heel. They fit every time. In lieu of an actual foot to try a sock on I use a cardboard template traced around the foot. This allows for a truly customized fit every time even with different yarn weights and varying row gauge. Minimal math. For me less math is good as I struggle with math. What I know I learned from Lifestyle Toe Up Socks and a toe up heel flap sock pattern by Liat Gat. Both free.
 

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I make LOTS of socks. It seems to be a gift no one has issues with. But . . . it helps if they fit. Currently I'm trying to perfect socks for me. I've conquered my toes (flat, wide toes need more CO stitches) and foot width (64 st, same weight yarn, US 0, 1"x2" rib in arch) and EOP heel reinforcement. Working on foot length vs. narrow heel without decreasing stitches that messes up patterns. Currently trying more shadow wraps (no heel flap) -- more than 1/3 on each side. Read through Kate Atherly's book, but she puts heel flaps on everything. Any other thoughts?
 

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I make LOTS of socks. It seems to be a gift no one has issues with. But . . . it helps if they fit. Currently I'm trying to perfect socks for me. I've conquered my toes (flat, wide toes need more CO stitches) and foot width (64 st, same weight yarn, US 0, 1"x2" rib in arch) and EOP heel reinforcement. Working on foot length vs. narrow heel without decreasing stitches that messes up patterns. Currently trying more shadow wraps (no heel flap) -- more than 1/3 on each side. Read through Kate Atherly's book, but she puts heel flaps on everything. Any other thoughts?
I'll sacrifice style and fashion for fit every day of the week. I have very narrow, long heels and have settled on a very high + instep gusset. If I need to I'll do the entire foot in stockinette rather than have patterning on the instep, but I do prefer plain Jane sock feet anyhow. With regular fingering I generally increase to 58 sts (toe up, knit to fit) but with light fingering I've had to use 60 sts or even more, depending on the yarn and how stretchy it is. The ways I've found to to fit the smaller circumference of the rest of my foot after the ball: switch to smaller needles and/or decrease out the extras. You're doing short row heels and for fitting odd ball feet like mine, they don't work. I wish you luck on you quest. Mine has been long and challenging but rewarding.
 

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I need 76-80 stitches for my foot, size 2mm needle and regular sock yarn. I always do the foot plain, they feel better on my foot and it's a lot less work.
And most footwear hides whatever patterning you’ve put on the foot part anyway.
 

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I'll sacrifice style and fashion for fit every day of the week. I have very narrow, long heels and have settled on a very high + instep gusset. If I need to I'll do the entire foot in stockinette rather than have patterning on the instep, but I do prefer plain Jane sock feet anyhow. With regular fingering I generally increase to 58 sts (toe up, knit to fit) but with light fingering I've had to use 60 sts or even more, depending on the yarn and how stretchy it is. The ways I've found to to fit the smaller circumference of the rest of my foot after the ball: switch to smaller needles and/or decrease out the extras. You're doing short row heels and for fitting odd ball feet like mine, they don't work. I wish you luck on you quest. Mine has been long and challenging but rewarding.
A number of years ago after reading this site, I bought the Fish Lips Sock pattern. Still only one dollar! She tells how to make a cardboard template of your foot so that your socks always fit. I still prefer that short row heel pattern. I also prefer a K3 P1 ribbing for the top of the sock over a plain stockinette stitch. I think it holds the sock closer to the leg.
 

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I'll sacrifice style and fashion for fit every day of the week. I have very narrow, long heels and have settled on a very high + instep gusset. If I need to I'll do the entire foot in stockinette rather than have patterning on the instep, but I do prefer plain Jane sock feet anyhow. With regular fingering I generally increase to 58 sts (toe up, knit to fit) but with light fingering I've had to use 60 sts or even more, depending on the yarn and how stretchy it is. The ways I've found to to fit the smaller circumference of the rest of my foot after the ball: switch to smaller needles and/or decrease out the extras. You're doing short row heels and for fitting odd ball feet like mine, they don't work. I wish you luck on you quest. Mine has been long and challenging but rewarding.
I have found if I need more room in the heel I can shortrow down to the heel width I need then shortrow back out half way, down again, then back out to the full width of the bottom of the foot. It forms a bit of a y shape. I got this idea from a youtube video but I can't seem to find it now. its a bit fussy I admit but it is a solution. It may have been something I picked up for the knitting machine but the concept can be used for hand as well.
 

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I have found if I need more room in the heel I can shortrow down to the heel width I need then shortrow back out half way, down again, then back out to the full width of the bottom of the foot. It forms a bit of a y shape. I got this idea from a youtube video but I can't seem to find it now. its a bit fussy I admit but it is a solution. It may have been something I picked up for the knitting machine but the concept can be used for hand as well.
Could it have been the late Cat Bordhi's Sweet Tomato Heel?
If your heels are more on the round than bony side this could be a good fit. I made a pair of socks following this heel video and it was easy and neat.
 

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Could it have been the late Cat Bordhi's Sweet Tomato Heel?
If your heels are more on the round than bony side this could be a good fit. I made a pair of socks following this heel video and it was easy and neat.
Such a clearly explained video!!! It almost makes me want to knit another sock.
 

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It wasn't the one I was talking about but I do use 2 stitch pairs, which is why you have to do wedges or the y thing because the angle is so short. I will have to try this. I had heard about it but hadn't actually seen it done before. thanks for the video.
 
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