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I taught my 19year old gd to knit this afternoon band she took to it like a duck to water. I am so thrilled.
 

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I am so glad to hear about people just learning to knit. My neighbor's 8 year old great niece told me that her mother told her that knitting was for OLD people. I told her that that's not true. Almost any age can enjoy knitting and there are so many new and beautiful patterns to use.. I joined our senior center because I was told that they had a woman who was teaching knitting there. I thought maybe she could give me some tips to learn. Well as it turned out the woman was no longer there. So now, it seems, I am the woman. I told them that I wasn't professional but that I do love to knit and would be glad to teach anyone who wanted to learn what I know. So far the only one who wanted to learn was a woman who only wants to garter stitch and do something tiny like coasters. I would dearly LOVE to get someone excited about learning. Is there a good way to go about it? I have offered some VERY simple projects to get started on. I even supply the yarn and needles and tell them they can keep them if they want. Also, I am VERY patient and really try to encourage them as they learn. I've shown them some nice things that I have completed and they all seem to like them. I thought that would spark an interest. Just so you know-- these are not disabled seniors. Many are much younger than I am. Just venting a little here.
 

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When I was at high school we had to crochet around a hanky or face washer. As well as being taught sewing. But only the girls! We were not taught knitting. The boys had to do wood work & metalwork. Unfortunately the home crafts teacher could not teach me to crotchet as I am left handed. All I could manage was about a metre of chain. So the teacher marked me 1 out of 4 ( for trying). My mum said she would teach me to crochet but I think I've missed the boat as she is now 87 & has macular degeneration as well as unstable angina plus she lives in North Queensland & I live in Victoria. She did teach me to knit when I was a little girl over 50 years ago.
 

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I wish that I could teach Katie, my niece, how to knit. The first time I tried to teach her was a disaster! I just got frustrated and so did she. Now she thinks it is too hard to learn. Any tips on how I can show her how to knit? She will be 8 at the end of this month. She was 6 the last time I tried to teach her.
 

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Try sitting her down just in front of you and hold the needles with her, showing her each step one at a time, talking through the process. Something like, right needle into stitch, yarn round needle, pull loop through stitch, slide stitch off left needle.
 

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I have taught 2 of my granddaughters how to knit at the age of 5. They consider it a right of passage. My Gramma taught me at the age of 5, so therefore their Gramma had to teach them at the age of 5. They were taught with this same method, sitting in my lap and talking our way through it. Three more years until the youngest granddaughter will learn. By the way, they are all sisters and totally different personalities! A redhead, a brunette and a blond!
 

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I found a couple tutorials on youtube.

There are two parts.

Learn How to Crochet LEFT HAND - Part 1 - Beginner Basics Chain, Single Crochet, CH, SC LH

Learn How to Crochet LEFT HAND Part 2 - Half Double Crochet Slip Stitch Chain DC HDC SLST

Along the right side of the screen on both tutorials there are other stitches for lefties.
These are very easy to follow and are shown slowly so you can follow along

There are also tutorials for teaching right handed.

These would be great for taking home to watch again and again on the computer. Especially after you show them how and they try the following day and just can't quite get it.
 

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My grandmother taught me with the mantra "in, round, through, and off" as in:- put the RH needle in to the stitch on the LH needle, wind the wool round the needle, bring the RH needle back through with the new stitch on it, and slide the stitch off.

Cast on for her, and show her garter stitch slowly. Perhaps do row each then cast off for her. If you aim for small projects such as squares of a scarf, and ring the changes using different colours to keep her interested. Good luck and remember its fun.
 

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susanjoy said:
Try sitting her down just in front of you and hold the needles with her, showing her each step one at a time, talking through the process. Something like, right needle into stitch, yarn round needle, pull loop through stitch, slide stitch off left needle.
That is exactly what I did with my 5-year old granddaughter. She can now tell you exactly how to make the stitches, but doesn't yet have her muscles trained to exactly what she tells them. I promised her we'll try again next year (they live 12 hours driving away from us), and she decided that I should save the ball of yarn we'd been working with, as she is "going to make a sweater for Daddy"....
 

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no1girl said:
shame it is not taught in schools these days. grade 4 we started, and knitted every year until I left after year three. also dressmaking, crochet, weaving, and cooking.
Back in the '50s we could choose "Home Economics" as an elective. I took cooking and sewing. I can't remember that knit or crochet was even offered.

My mom taught me to sew and to cook, so I'm not sure why I elected those courses. But I learned to knit from a classmate in nursing school and finally found someone who could show me how to crochet when I was in my 60s. Never too late..........
 
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