Knitting and Crochet Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a Mentor and was asked to teach a class of knitting..I will have a group of girls of ages 9 and up..plan on simple scarf pattern of knit every row..any suggestion to make this class as easy as possible.
I do have a poem I plan on handing out..any other ideas?

"Under the Fence, around the sheep.
Bring them through and off he leaps."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,959 Posts
My suggestion is to have them avoid any fuzzy or loopy yarn - too hard to see the stitches. Also, I've found that brightly colored varigated yarn helps them to see how the yarn runs because most of the time the working yarn is a different color than the stitch they're knitting into.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41,678 Posts
I also suggest a larger bamboo or other wooden needle - #8 or above. Depending on the age group, etc., these seem to be more comfortable for hands and wrists and the stitches don't slide off so easily as with the slick metal or acrylic needles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
853 Posts
Hand out printed pages with lots of easy instructions and clear pictures. Or better yet request that each participant buy a simple knitting instruction book; an example being the learn to knit books that they sell cheaply at Walmart. I don't learn and retain well what I only see and hear. I need instructions that I can refer to often. You could also hand out a list of web sites that the girls could look at on the internet to learn and practice with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
Depending on when your class is, you may want to scrounge around in the thrift stores or Goodwill or the like (or even eBay) and see if you can find more short size 10 needles. Just make sure you get them back at the end! Klutz also produces a "learn to knit" book and kit with variegated yarn and somewhat shorter than usual needles (size 8, I think). it's a tad expensive though, but it also gives directions for lefties. My daughter got it for Christmas last year and it really helped smooth out some of the issues with me being a "righty" and her being a "lefty".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
I worked with 8, 9, 10 year olds for the past 5 summers. I recommend using 9 or 10 needles, not a dark color yarn as the stitches do not show up as well and the first several sessions knit only. We just did garter stitch for the first two years with our girls since we only met once a week for two months. Then when we could see that they had it down pat, we taught the purl stitch. Then this summer we had a helper that had a clever husband. She took all the needles home and he cut them down, reattached the end piece and they got along much better with shorter needles. Enjoy. Some children pick it up very easily as they are visual learners and others that are auditory learners need that little rhyme. Others are tactile learners and they need to get the feel of it. So do not be discouraged if you have to teach in all three ways to get success. Can you tell I was a kindergarten teacher for 30+ years??? Linda
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,068 Posts
Hi-I taught my grand-children how to knit using worsted weight yarn- if you get a multi color or stripe Red Heart is good they don't get bored watching the colors change-also if you use double pointed needles in a size 8 or 9 they fit thier hands better-you just use a stopper at the ends works great-I still use the double points for all scarfs -you can cast on up to 20 stitches with no problem-15 is a good start for children as the rows go fast-hope this helps-nana-d
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
if they have never knitted before, you could start with straw knitting, then go to finger knitting, and then kneedles. using medium string, rd shoe lace size, or even torn thin strips of tee shirts are good for starting also. have a variety available and let them choose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,967 Posts
Check ebay. You can buy large batches of a single size very inexpensively. I actually found my local dollar store carries knitting needles (usually size 9 or 10) and small batches of yarn. The needles were plastic and not too slick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,208 Posts
When I taught "tweens" at our church...I used large wooden or bamboo needles...bright acrylic worsted or bulky weight yarns.

I also got some core board from the craft store and made a sample of each thing I would be teaching..ie... cast on, knit, purl, cast off, stockinette stitch and garter stitch..

Also consider knitting a garter stitch dishcloth instead of a scarf...smaller projects completed give them satisfaction of a job well done and motivate them to knit more at another time.

As they, would sit at a circular table and I would go to each one to help..they could always look at the board of samples I made.

Everything went so well...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,988 Posts
What ever you choose for the first project has to knit up quickly so they have a sense of accomplishment. Unless the children are from an underprivileged area, I would tell them what type of needles to buy and what brand of yarn and colours to purchase. Then give them a couple of places they can buy the materials. That way they get to keep the needles and even if they don't stick with it now, later on in life they might just look at those needles and that left over wool and try again. That is what happened to me. I was to learn to knit for Brownies. My mother bought me bright green worsted weight yarn and bright red plastic needles in a size 7. I never learned to knit then but when I was a young mother and on my own because my husband was away, I pulled those things out and started with a book called Learning to Knit by Patons. It helped occupy my evenings when my children were in bed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks ..my first class is this afternoon. I will keep you posted. I am going to start with a garter stitch cotton dish cloth, so they can finish and keep or give away and then we will go on to a scarf..I think it is important that they do feel accomplishment in finishing the item.

Thanks for your tips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,208 Posts
I am happy to hear you are going with the dishcloth I suggested....Starting a project and seeing it finished is a great confidence builder...also gives them inspiration to do another and keep up with their newly learned skills.

I am sure you will do just awesome...they will bless you beyond measure.

Hugs and God Bless you,

Camilla

joyfullypink said:
Thanks ..my first class is this afternoon. I will keep you posted. I am going to start with a garter stitch cotton dish cloth, so they can finish and keep or give away and then we will go on to a scarf..I think it is important that they do feel accomplishment in finishing the item.

Thanks for your tips.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top Bottom