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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
From what you have written so far, you will be teaching people who already know how to knit, correct? If not, if you are opening it up to "anyone interested", be careful - you may get some non-knitters, who would need to be taught the basics.
When I was working at the yarn store, one of our experienced teachers (who often led newbie classes as well as more advanced classes) was sent to do a workshop on a simple lace scarf during a breast cancer awareness event. It was a one time, single session to help with the skills needed to make an awareness scarf pattern that had some lace work. She got quite a mix of people, some with previous lace experience, some without, and lots who'd never picked up knitting needles in their life! She did what she could, but said it was super stressful, and that it should have been advertised that it was not a beginner class/project.
Yes, thank you. Valid point. I will be sure to include, must know knitting basic in the first line of the course description
 

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Hi there, hope your day is going well.
I have been cajoled into teaching Artistic Knitting starting in September. This stems from my annual yarn bombing pieces. Several of us have been trying to start a fiber art section at our Visual Arts Center.
So! I would really, really like any & all input. I have several washcloths, each having a different design to demonstrate the knit vs pearl for the first day. Next session I plan to bring Knitting graph paper so they can outline something they want to make. That's all I know so far. Please give me advice, ideas, etc View attachment 1234952
My mother taught me artistic knitting when I was little and I didn't really know it. She would see images in magazines or cartoons even children's books and then she would put it on graph paper. The image would then be put on a sweater or embroidered on a blanket or wall hanging. She even used those images to make quilts for each of us. She loved color and always expressed herself with it. For your class I would suggest people bring in books and magazines and photos of favorite places to help them experiment with color and images.
 

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My mother taught me artistic knitting when I was little and I didn't really know it. She would see images in magazines or cartoons even children's books and then she would put it on graph paper. The image would then be put on a sweater or embroidered on a blanket or wall hanging. She even used those images to make quilts for each of us. She loved color and always expressed herself with it. For your class I would suggest people bring in books and magazines and photos of favorite places to help them experiment with color and images.
Bringing in pictures is a good idea. I was thinking of getting a few coloring books since the items have strong outlines...but magazines will work with those who are able to draw.
 

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Bringing in pictures is a good idea. I was thinking of getting a few coloring books since the items have strong outlines...but magazines will work with those who are able to draw.
Colouring books and drawing - two of the banes of my life!!! I absolutely canNOT colour within the lines in even the simplest of pre-school level colouring books, and my attempts at drawing anything non-geometric are farcical. Yes, my lowest marks in school were penmanship (=drawing by a more specific name) and art. 🫤
 

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Oooos, sorry for the doubles. Punta Gorda, FL has a Visual Arts Center that holds classes by incredibly accomplished instructors. I am shaking in my shoes since being tagged to teach this class. But I would really like to succeed getting more knitters willing to forego patterns & try making their own designs. There are SO many talented knitters in Knitters Paradise I figured you would have very respectable suggestions. :)
So start out that way - they are kids - which are very versatile at adapting. Give them a bit of history about knitting and then assign they to pick something that they find interesting and come back with a report on it for the next class - or next week, whatever. Using their report, get them to design something that would be needed in their story report, no limitations on their ideas. Next step, after they get their designs done, is to build it! NOW, they are excited and pumped as they are going to learn how to make something that they thought of - all on their own. Voila, they have just aced the class in designing their product. You will be surprised how many will come up with 3D objects. Good Luck! :D (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Colouring books and drawing - two of the banes of my life!!! I absolutely canNOT colour within the lines in even the simplest of pre-school level colouring books, and my attempts at drawing anything non-geometric are farcical. Yes, my lowest marks in school were penmanship (=drawing by a more specific name) and art. 🫤
I think there women could trace a strong outline on graph paper. I hope!
Wow! Those soldiers are amazing! Please post more of your work.
I didearlier in this discussion. Thank you.
 

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Re your graph paper comment. I knit a sweater for my grandson (many moons ago) when he was a toddler. I used a pattern for a plain sweater, counted the stitches and rows onto the graph paper, traced the image of his favourite character Igglepiggle from a comic, transferred it onto the graph paper. I was surprised how easy it was to make - fiddly at first as I'd never done anything like that before. Maybe a small garment where they both follow a set pattern but adapt it to insert an intarsia image of their own design. Another idea (going back to school/college Art class days) also using graph paper - take a simple landscape - transfer the image to the graph paper and knit the various bushes, trees, boulders etc in a different stitch to create the picture, more advanced might like to use different colours and shades - the finished piece could then be framed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Debi55, your yarn bombing is beyond awesome! So talented. Thanks for sharing the photos and the inspiration!
I'm blushing. Thank you
Re your graph paper comment. I knit a sweater for my grandson (many moons ago) when he was a toddler. I used a pattern for a plain sweater, counted the stitches and rows onto the graph paper, traced the image of his favourite character Igglepiggle from a comic, transferred it onto the graph paper. I was surprised how easy it was to make - fiddly at first as I'd never done anything like that before. Maybe a small garment where they both follow a set pattern but adapt it to insert an intarsia image of their own design. Another idea (going back to school/college Art class days) also using graph paper - take a simple landscape - transfer the image to the graph paper and knit the various bushes, trees, boulders etc in a different stitch to create the picture, more advanced might like to use different colours and shades - the finished piece could then be framed.
Look at you! You are a fiber artist! Thank you for your ideas.👏
 
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