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I remember that salute. My Dad was outraged & we older kids argued with him about the Civil rights struggles in our country. I never knew the name of the Aussie, let alone his story. I agree, his statue needs to be on that empty podium. Thanks for sharing this.
 

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NJG said:
A story well worth reading

http://www.littlethings.com/real-peter-norman-story/?utm_source=shemarm&utm_medium=Facebook&utm_campaign=inspiring
That certainly is a story worth reading. I was not aware of Peter Norman or the role that he played and how he was ostracized by his country. I was aware though of the racism in Australia at that time. My (then) husband and I did a great deal of research on Australia as we seriously considered applying to immigrate there. That restrictive (racist) policy among other issues the time made us decide against doing so. By the way, met the criteria and would almost certainly have been accepted.
Thanks for sharing this NJG.
 

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NJG said:
A story well worth reading

http://www.littlethings.com/real-peter-norman-story/?utm_source=shemarm&utm_medium=Facebook&utm_campaign=inspiring
That is an interesting article but it does not tell the complete truth.

Peter Norman was not part of the Australian 1972 Olympic team because the Australian Olympic Committee decided not to field a men's track sprinting team.

He was not ostracised and neglected by Australia. He kept running and also played football. He represented Australia in the 1970 Commonwealth Games and the 1969 Pacific Conference Games.

Recognition
• 1999 - Sport Australia Hall of Fame inductee
• 2000 - Australian Sports Medal
• 2010 - Athletics Australia Hall of Fame inductee

Later career
Norman quit athletics after the decision not to field an Australian men's track sprinting team in the 1972 Olympics and took up Australian rules football. Norman kept running, but in 1985 contracted gangrene after tearing his Achilles tendon during a charity race, which nearly led to his leg being amputated. Depression, heavy drinking and pain killer addiction followed Before the 1968 Olympics Norman was a trainer for West Brunswick Australian rules football club as a way of keeping fit over winter during the athletic circuit's off season. After 1968 he played 67 games for West Brunswick between 1972 and 1977 before coaching an under 19 team in 1978.
During his athletics career Norman was coached by Neville Sillitoe.

[Career achievements
International competitions
Year Competition Venue Position Event Notes
1962 Commonwealth Games
Perth, Australia
6th S/F 1 ; 12/43 220 yards 21.8(22.03)(−2.8)
1966 Commonwealth Games
Kingston, Jamaica
6th Q/F ; 29/54 100 yards 10.2(10.27)(−5.0)
6th S/F 1 ; 10/56 220 yards 21.2(0.0)
3rd 4×110 yards 40.0
5th 4×440 yards 3:12.2
1968 Olympic Games
Mexico City,Mexico
2nd 200 m 20.0 (20.06)(+0.9)
1969 Pacific Conference Games
Tokyo, Japan
4th 100 m 10.8(−0.1)
1st 200 m 21.0(−0.1)
1st 4 × 100 m 40.8
1970 Commonwealth Games
Edinburgh,Scotland
5th 200 m 20.86(+1.7)
DNF Heat1 ; 14th 4 × 100 m Dropped baton
National championships
Year Competition Venue Position Event Notes
1965/66 Australian Championships
Perth, Western Australia
1st 200 m 20.9 (−1.2)
1966/67 Australian Championships
Adelaide, South Australia
1st 200 m 21.3
1967/68 Australian Championships
Sydney, New South Wales
1st 200 m 20.5 (0.0)
1968/69 Australian Championships
Melbourne,Victoria
2nd 100 m 10.6 (−0.5)
1st 200 m 21.3 (−3.1)
1969/70 Australian Championships
Adelaide, South Australia
1st 200 m 21.0 (−2.1)
1971/72 Australian Championships
Perth, Western Australia
3rd 200 m 21.6

Death
Norman died of a heart attack on 3 October 2006 in Melbourne at the age of 64. US Track and Field Federation proclaimed 9 October 2006, the date of his funeral, as Peter Norman Day. Thirty-eight years after the three made history, both Smith and Carlos gave eulogies and were pallbearers at Norman's funeral. At the time of his death, Norman was survived by his second wife, Jan, and their daughters, Belinda and Emma, his first wife, Ruth, and children, Gary, Sandra and Janita, and four grandchildren
2012 Parliamentary apology debate
The apology
In August 2012, the Australian Parliament debated a motion to provide a posthumous apology to Norman. On 11 October 2012 the Australian Parliament passed the wording of an official apology that read:
" PETER NORMAN
The order of the day having been read for the resumption of the debate on the motion of Dr Leigh- That this House:
(1) recognises the extraordinary athletic achievements of the late Peter Norman, who won the silver
medal in the 200 metres sprint running event at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, in a time of 20.06
seconds, which still stands as the Australian record;
(2) acknowledges the bravery of Peter Norman in donning an Olympic Project for Human Rights
badge on the podium, in solidarity with African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John
Carlos, who gave the 'black power' salute;
(3) apologises to Peter Norman for the wrong done by Australia in failing to send him to the 1972
Munich Olympics, despite repeatedly qualifying; and
(4) belatedly recognises the powerful role that Peter Norman played in furthering racial equality-
Debate resumed by Dr Leigh who moved, by leave, as an amendment-Omit paragraph (3), substitute:
(3) apologises to Peter Norman for the treatment he received upon his return to Australia, and the
failure to fully recognise his inspirational role before his untimely death in 2006 "
In a 2012 interview, Carlos said:
" There's no-one in the nation of Australia that should be honoured, recognised, appreciated more than Peter Norman for his humanitarian concerns, his character, his strength and his willingness to be a sacrificial lamb for justice.
"
Apology claims disputed
The Australian Olympic Committee has disputed the claims made in the Australian Parliament apology about Norman paying a price in supporting Carlos and Smith. The AOC made the following comments:
• Norman was not punished by the Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) He was cautioned by Chef de Mission Judy Patching the evening of the medal ceremony and then given as many tickets as he wanted to go and watch a hockey match.
• Norman was not selected 1972 Munich Olympics as he did not meet the selection standard which entailed an athlete equaling or better the Olympic qualifying standard (20.9) and performing creditably at the Australian Athletics Championships. Norman ran several qualifying times from 1969-1971 but he finished third in the 1972 Australian Athletics Championships behind Greg Lewis and Gary Eddy in a time of 21.6. At the time Norman, commented: "All I had to do was to win, even in a slow time, and I think I would have been off to Munich". Norman did not tell the selectors he was carrying a knee injury. Australasian Amateur Athletics' magazine stated "The dilemma for selectors here was how could they select Norman and not Lewis. Pity that Peter did not win because that would have been the only requirement for a Munich ticket".
• In the lead up to the 2000 Sydney Olympics, the AOC stated "Norman was involved in numerous Olympic events in his home city of Melbourne. He announced several teams for the AOC in Melbourne and was on the stage in his Mexico 1968 blazer congratulating athletes. He was very much acknowledged as an Olympian and the AOC valued his contribution."[21] Due to cost considerations, the AOC did not have the resources to bring all Australian Olympians to Sydney and Norman was offered the same chance to buy tickets as other Australian Olympians. The AOC did not believe that Norman was owed an apology.
It has been stated that United States authorities invited him to participate in the 2000 Sydney Olympics after they found out he was not attending. On 17 October 2003, San Jose State University unveiled a statue commemorating the 1968 Olympic protest; Norman was not included as part of the statue itself - his empty podium spot intended for others viewing the statue to "take a stand" - but was invited to deliver a speech at the ceremony.
Legacy]

Three Proud People mural in Newtown.
Norman's nephew Matt Norman directed and produced the cinema-released documentary Salute (2008) about the three runners through Paramount Pictures and Transmission Films. Paul Byrnes in his Sydney Morning Herald review of Salute says that the film makes it clear why Norman stood with the other two athletes. Byrnes writes, "He was a devout Christian, raised in the Salvation Army [and] believed passionately in equality for all, regardless of colour, creed or religion-the Olympic code".
An airbrush mural of the trio on podium was painted in 2000 in the inner-city suburb of Newtown in Sydney. Silvio Offria, who allowed an artist known only as "Donald" to paint the mural on his house in Leamington Lane, said Norman came to see the mural, "He came and had his photo taken, he was very happy." The monochrome tribute, captioned "THREE PROUD PEOPLE MEXICO 68," was under threat of demolition in 2010 to make way for a rail tunnel but is now listed as an item of heritage significance.
Recognition
• 1999 - Sport Australia Hall of Fame inductee
• 2000 - Australian Sports Medal
• 2010 - Athletics Australia Hall of Fame inductee
 

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Nanny's Knits said:
That certainly is a story worth reading. I was not aware of Peter Norman or the role that he played and how he was ostracized by his country. I was aware though of the racism in Australia at that time. My (then) husband and I did a great deal of research on Australia as we seriously considered applying to immigrate there. That restrictive (racist) policy among other issues the time made us decide against doing so. By the way, met the criteria and would almost certainly have been accepted.
Thanks for sharing this NJG.
Peter Norman was not ostracised by his country. This article gives the impression that Australia had an apartheid culture, similar to South Africa at the time. This is most definitely not true. Australians took a strong stand against South Africa's racial policies and refused to play cricket against South Africa because of theiri policies. Australia has never had a policy of segregation of students in schools as was practiced by other countries. Australia did have a restrictive immigration policy in place from 1901 to 1966. Our then Prime Minister, Harold Holt abolished it in 1966, so there was most definitely not an apartheid migration policy in place in 1968. Unfortunately Australia did have many people who held racist views regarding Indigenous Australians.

Regarding immigration to Australia, The Migration Act 1966 established legal equality between British, European and non-European migrants to Australia.

These changes to immigration policy were some of the most significant steps towards the formation of multicultural Australia.

Under the new legislation, all potential migrants were now subject to the same rules and restrictions surrounding visas, and were eligible to become citizens of Australia after the same waiting period. People were selected based on what they might offer Australian society, rather than their race or nationality.

So if you had been considering immigration to Australia in 1968 you would not have been judged on your race or the colour of your skin. Perhaps your research was centered on policies that applied prior to 1966; policies that no longer applied at the time.
 

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Nanny's Knits said:
That certainly is a story worth reading. I was not aware of Peter Norman or the role that he played and how he was ostracized by his country. I was aware though of the racism in Australia at that time. My (then) husband and I did a great deal of research on Australia as we seriously considered applying to immigrate there. That restrictive (racist) policy among other issues the time made us decide against doing so. By the way, met the criteria and would almost certainly have been accepted.
Thanks for sharing this NJG.
In 1962, the Menzies Government (1949-1966) amended the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 to enable all Indigenous Australians to enroll to vote in Australian federal elections.

Australia never had scenes such as this

During the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, voting rights activists in the South were subjected to various forms of mistreatment and violence. One event that outraged many Americans occurred on March 7, 1965, when peaceful participants in a voting rights march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery were met by Alabama state troopers who attacked them with nightsticks, tear gas and whips after they refused to turn back. Some protesters were severely beaten, and others ran for their lives.
 

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Knitted by Nan said:
Peter Norman was not ostracised by his country. This article gives the impression that Australia had an apartheid culture, similar to South Africa at the time. This is most definitely not true. Australians took a strong stand against South Africa's racial policies and refused to play cricket against South Africa because of theiri policies. Australia has never had a policy of segregation of students in schools as was practiced by other countries. Australia did have a restrictive immigration policy in place from 1901 to 1966. Our then Prime Minister, Harold Holt abolished it in 1966, so there was most definitely not an apartheid migration policy in place in 1968. Unfortunately Australia did have many people who held racist views regarding Indigenous Australians.

Regarding immigration to Australia, The Migration Act 1966 established legal equality between British, European and non-European migrants to Australia.

These changes to immigration policy were some of the most significant steps towards the formation of multicultural Australia.

Under the new legislation, all potential migrants were now subject to the same rules and restrictions surrounding visas, and were eligible to become citizens of Australia after the same waiting period. People were selected based on what they might offer Australian society, rather than their race or nationality.

So if you had been considering immigration to Australia in 1968 you would not have been judged on your race or the colour of your skin. Perhaps your research was centered on policies that applied prior to 1966; policies that no longer applied at the time.
It was 1964 when we considered immigration to Australia and as I said we would have met all criteria of the time, including being white. The government was giving financial incentives to those who qualified.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
berigora said:
Thank you so much for that link. The White Australia Policy has a lot to answer for and there will be many of us who are downright ashamed of it. Unfortunately there are also many who want to revive it.
I am sorry to say it is that way in the states too. I thought we were much further along until President Obama was elected. It brought a lot of racists out of the woodwork so to speak.
 

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NJG said:
I am sorry to say it is that way in the states too. I thought we were much further along until President Obama was elected. It brought a lot of racists out of the woodwork so to speak.
Isn't it strange how that happened? When President Obama was first elected it seemed as though (most) everyone was excited and happy to finally have a black president. US was finally breaking down the racial barriers. Eight years later the Republicans are blaming him for everything that is wrong with your country and Donald Trump is calling him the founder of ISIS. All of the racism that was simmering under the surface is now out there in the open for all to see and it ain't pretty.
Unfortunately there are a few here on KP who make no attempt to be inclusive, be it race, sexual preference or whatever.
One step forward, many steps back. :sm25: :sm25: :sm25:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Nanny's Knits said:
Isn't it strange how that happened? When President Obama was first elected it seemed as though (most) everyone was excited and happy to finally have a black president. US was finally breaking down the racial barriers. Eight years later the Republicans are blaming him for everything that is wrong with your country and Donald Trump is calling him the founder of ISIS. All of the racism that was simmering under the surface is now out there in the open for all to see and it ain't pretty.
Unfortunately there are a few here on KP who make no attempt to be inclusive, be it race, sexual preference or whatever.
One step forward, many steps back. :sm25: :sm25: :sm25:
Very well said. Just because you don't say it out loud, doesn't mean it isn't there. This country has become so partisan and republicans have done everything to keep President Obama from accomplishing anything. It has been party before country for the last eight years and not sure when that will change.

I love to hear the personal stories from the Olympics. I watched some of the Equestrian/Dressage the other day and they told a story of each rider and how they connected to the horse they were riding, training struggles etc that they went through to get to the Olympics. I thought it was very interesting.
 
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