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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been rremembering the traditions that my dear Grammy brought from Europe. The food music, handwork. The funny little things like wearing garlic around my neck as a little girl to ward off werewolfs. Must. Have worked never met one...But seriously do you have any traditions that you try to keep.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
There are all kinds of traditions using pots from your gram is one way. Different foods, washing your hands on NY day for luck. Born in mpls. Mn. There were a lot of people from Sweden. So experienced the food.
 

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started a baking day with visiting GD and now includes all 4, even the smallest picks out a china cup and we taste and drink to the results of a lot of fun! they make up plates of brownies, cookies for the other Gparents. Some of the icing color choices are a sight to behold! Jello and real whipped cream for large dinners, keeping the family gravesite tidy and respectful, chinese food at a restaurant the last truck load of harvest ( in later years as we did not want Mum to cook), special christmas decorations put out even if no tree, my sis likes the Christmas in July, I send all her mail on Christmas cards and we send my birthday card from my sis that passed, between we other three for the last 13 years. We have many more but these are favourites.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good for you. Looks like you are keeping those memories alive. Any ethnic traditions? My gram taught me Russian embroidery. She made a large tablecloth. For a Russian costume all embroidered blouse. Treasures.
 

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My Grandma used to keep rubber bands on a doorknob in the kitchen. LOL! I do the same thing. I always know where to find a rubber band. I have my other grandma's pastry board. I cherish it, as she was an excellent baker.
 

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Every Christmas morning we all get together and have "Saddle Blankets" (they are Swedish pancakes, sort of like crepes),
then we open gifts. My grandma was from Norway and her brother was the one who called them Saddle Blankets. We all
look forward to breakfast together.
 

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I can remember my mother opening the back door to let the old year out on New Year's Day, then opening the front door to let the new year in. Also, no poultry on New Year's Day, or you scratch for a living the rest of the year. Eat pork instead, because pigs cannot moved backwards, they are always moving forward (no idea if this is actually true).

From my father-in-law's Filipina lady friend - put money in your windows on New Year's Eve, because money finds money. Not entirely sure this works, but I even snuck a penny onto my boss's office windowsill. Hasn't hurt the company one bit.

Enjoy your day.
 

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ballerina said:
Sorry meant to say isn't it a great way to keep memories alive. I had better read the posts before sending.
Ha! I thought you were complaining that CarollfromTX's rubber band tradition was not "worthy"!!! I do the same with rubber bands, as did my mother. Yesterday I group facebooked my 3 daughters and asked "where do you keep your rubber bands?" One said "on the doorknob, of course". One said "on a doorknob, like you and grandma did"' and the third said "I think mom's losing it again!"... So this tradition continues. :0)
 

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Ha ha. Every so often I have to clean off the kitchen door knob as it gets too crowded with the rubber bands. Does anyone else put paper money under an Infant of Prague statue so you will always have enough to support the family?
 

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Growing up we always celebrated Christmas Eve with family, food, and gift exchanges. I carry that tradition with my siblings and family. We usually have 40+ in our home. My son loves it. Christmas morning, it's just us. And of course, sauerkraut and pork on New Year's Day for good luck!
 

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For me it's sewing.
My great-grandmother was a seamstress and had her own dressmaker shop. By all accounts, it was quite successful.
My grandmother sewed, too.
So did my mother. She could sew anything! She made most of our clothes. That included everything from pajamas, play clothes, school dresses and skirts, coats, jackets, suits, slipcovers, curtains, and drapes. There was nothing she wouldn't try!
She put a needle in my hand when I was five, and a sewing card with yarn. She bought me a little embroidery kit and showed me how to make the stitches. Later, when I was ten, after she bought an electric sewing machine, she passed on the treadle machine to me and my sister. That's how I began to learn.
Even now, when I am sewing, I sometimes think of all those sewing women who came before me, and I am happy to be carrying on the tradition.
My daughter sews, too, and she is wonderful at it. So it just goes on and on.
 

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I am of Greek/Polish heritage. On Easter day, Greeks dye all the eggs red, to signify the blood of Christ. We then tap each other's eggs. The winner with no or only one end cracked will have good luck for the year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
It is so nice to hear about your traditions. Very intersting. I neglected to say when you was your hands on NY day wash them in coins to have money all year
 
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