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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm knitting a cardigan for a friend and am well past the armhole decreases on the back piece. I don't feel comfortable pulling out the bottom (beginning) which is done all in garter stitch in order to add length.

Has anyone ever made a knitted section longer by the "picking up stitches" method on the bottom of garter stitch? I'm trying to visualize this..but I have a feeling it would look bulky and strange.

Any suggestions other than tearing out and beginning the entire piece again would be more than welcome.

Thanks.
 

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((((((( Hmmm..........interesting issue! TY for posting it. Crop lengths aren't so good, eh in a cardigan. @@

That would be a lot of stitches to pick up and if BO, they're hard to get into on the pick up.

I'm working on a swatch for you now over 10 sts and garter st, BO and am indeed facing a tight BO area = I BO, also using a size larger needle and then tried to also work '''loosely''' = tough to get into the stitch, but it does keep your G st going in the same ''''''''''horizontal''''''''''' design.

I like to keep the craft art the same where possible unless the designer has mixed K & C and I also finish caps in the round (knit/bottom up or top down) by decreasing/increasing to the point of needing or not needing DPN/s and then work the sts off or at the top with advanced crochet stitches = sweet looking item.

So, your idea is doable, but difficult, to pickup on the edge sts for more garter stitching; Flat row work; Final answer! LOL!

I'd be tempted to snag onto it with an advanced crochet stitch for a look-see.........and really enjoy the patterns now available combining K & C and have a wonderful book of patterns, too.

I'm sitting here now knitting over a few rows of garter stitch and with 10 sts, I've BO '''''loosely & with a size larger needle)and now the working yarn is still on the needle (not cut).

Turn the work and pick up 9 sts from left to right (if a RH knitter), heading towards the working yarn, (the tenth is still on the needle) = A ridge line at the pick up area = OK? Perhaps you could throw on a swatch of 10 sts in garter st and really see it in action before picking up on the sweater edge over...?.......many, many sts.......?

TTYL & HAND!!
~~~~~~~~~~

teresa1998 said:
I'm knitting a cardigan for a friend and am well past the armhole decreases on the back piece. I don't feel comfortable pulling out the bottom (beginning) which is done all in garter stitch in order to add length.

Has anyone ever made a knitted section longer by the "picking up stitches" method on the bottom of garter stitch? I'm trying to visualize this..but I have a feeling it would look bulky and strange.

Any suggestions other than tearing out and beginning the entire piece again would be more than welcome.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
anastasiatheo001 said:
How much too short is it?

Would a lacy botom edge solve the problem, picking up only some of the garter sts? You could either K or crochet it.
The cardigan seems a bit better now that I've almost completed the back piece. (I'm following the directions and my gauge is correct). Guess it just seems short because I'm used to having to add length to my own sweaters due to my long waist.

If I decide to actually lengthen it, I'll only have about 2 inches at most to add. I like your idea of picking up only some of the sts and adding a border. Thanks for the tip!
 

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I knit from the bottom all the time and have no problem with it. If I know in advance that I'm going to do that, I make sure and cast on the stitches, but if not, I generally knit the stitches onto the needle. When I do this and then realize I need to knit down from the bottom, it's a little more work, but not prohibitively so.

Take a circular needle that is several sizes smaller than the one you're using for the project. Starting at the tail, pull the knot out with a darning needle and make sure not to lose that first stitch. Put your needle into it. Then with every stitch following that, you'll see the next stitch, slide the needle into the stitch first, and then with your thumb nail or the darning needle, pull the tail out of that stitch. You'll begin to see the pattern of how this is done very quickly. Putting the stitch onto the needle before pulling the tail from the stitch helps to ensure you don't lose anything, and only the very first and very last stitches are difficult to keep track of, but not so difficult that this can't be done. Once you have all the stitches on the needle, it's a good idea to go through them with the circular needle and inspect them, one at a time, to make sure they are facing the right direction and you haven't split the yarn anywhere. Then simply knit the stitches off the smaller needle onto your project needle and keep going.

I see you have other solutions for this project, but if you need to use it in the future, don't let it intimidate you, it's much like going back a row, one stitch at a time, only without the needle for help.
 

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You're very welcome.

Years ago, I learned a method for making the hem of a sweater to keep it from getting stretched out over time, and this required that I take out the cast on row and knit from that end, so I got very good at it, and when I was faced with having to add a row or two to the bottom of a project, it was no longer frightening to do so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Buffy said:
You're very welcome.

Years ago, I learned a method for making the hem of a sweater to keep it from getting stretched out over time, and this required that I take out the cast on row and knit from that end, so I got very good at it, and when I was faced with having to add a row or two to the bottom of a project, it was no longer frightening to do so.
Buffy,

I know I've heard of getting more wear out of children's sweaters as they grow...it all involved taking out the bottom edge and simply making the pieces longer.

Question for you: Is there a particular cast-on method you use?
I almost always use the simple "long-tail" cast on.
 

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I don't know what anything is called because I'm essentially self-taught. When I learned things from others, I never really learned names of the methods. So, if you'll tell me what you do, I'll tell you if I do it.

When I cast on, I have the yarn wrapped around my thumb, and just pick each stitch up by slipping the loop off my thumb onto my needle. This doesn't require any length of tail because I don't use any yarn from the tail to cast on.

When I knit on stitches, I have to make the tail longer, as I use it and the ball to create the stitches. I make the loop around my thumb using the tail end, and also a strand of yarn around my index finger from the ball. I take the loop from my thumb to the needle, without removing it from my thumb, then pass the strand from my index finger over the needle, and then flip the loop off the needle and drop it from my thumb, just as if I were knitting a stitch from a needle. I know there are people who knit their stitches on with a needle, but I don't know how to do that. I learned this from a women from Scandinavia, I believe.
 
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