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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After reading post after post with someone (including myself) having problems with pattern directions, wouldn't it make more sense if NO abbreviations were used. If you mean that you should "increase"-write the word "increase" and not make up your own abbreviations. Which is what it appears to me that every designer does. Or you need to go to the website that has every abbreviation and hope that no one invented a new one. I know that this would take up more space, but if it helps one understand the pattern better wouldn't it be worth it???????? What do you think??
 

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Guess because I work with abbreviations all the time I am not having as much trouble.
This is what I do when I start a new pattern. I use colored highlighters to mark all the abbreviations. One color for each one that it new and I might need to review how it is done. I make notes along side of the abbreviation so that I know what is means.
I know of about 5 ways to increase, each one is very pattern use only. So to say increase might not tell you the right one to use. See what I mean.
Hope you have a better time reading..
 

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I agree with Deb-Babbles, I also read through each pattern first before starting a project, this gives you a chance to have an idea of the pattern, which increase and decrease to use and from this I get a mental 'map' of the shape and finished project shouldd look like . Then you can get out of the way any thing you have to look up before you start!

Barbs. X
 

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weaver1510 said:
After reading post after post with someone (including myself) having problems with pattern directions, wouldn't it make more sense if NO abbreviations were used. If you mean that you should "increase"-write the word "increase" and not make up your own abbreviations. Which is what it appears to me that every designer does. Or you need to go to the website that has every abbreviation and hope that no one invented a new one. I know that this would take up more space, but if it helps one understand the pattern better wouldn't it be worth it???????? What do you think??
Oh how I agree! I've been knitting for sixty years plus and get infuriated by new designers who make up their own abbreviations seemingly at random.
 

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Deb-Babbles said:
Guess because I work with abbreviations all the time I am not having as much trouble.
This is what I do when I start a new pattern. I use colored highlighters to mark all the abbreviations. One color for each one that it new and I might need to review how it is done. I make notes along side of the abbreviation so that I know what is means.
I know of about 5 ways to increase, each one is very pattern use only. So to say increase might not tell you the right one to use. See what I mean.
Hope you have a better time reading..
Good Idea, think I'll try that. I'm very visual, so I have my own abv. (like 0 for loop over, / for end of section before 0, etc.)
 

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This is just my two cents worth, but I think that learning abbreviations is just like learning anything new. Once you know them, you know them. A designer might invent a new abbreviation for a new stitch, but I agree that we should still use standard abbreviations for standard stitches. Also, if someone is NOT using standard abbreviations, he or she should include an abbreviation chart in their pattern.
 

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When I see directions that are completely written out, they look too confusing to me. Too much information. I like concise patterns. I think of abbreviations as shorthand. There are standard abbreviations for designers to use for most stitches, but if someone comes up with a new stitch, of course, if they give it an abbreviation they should write it out like any other pattern stitch. The abbreviation can often save a lot of space.
 

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maybe if we contacted the designers when we come across a NOT standard abbreviation and let them know that unless its specified in the pattern notes that their pattern is not knittable or crochetable.. or maybe there should be a standard that needs to be met before publishing a pattern.. neither one of my suggestions will work but maybe some designers seeing our unhappyness with what they put out there will double think what they write...
 

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barbsadams said:
I agree with Deb-Babbles, I also read through each pattern first before starting a project, this gives you a chance to have an idea of the pattern, which increase and decrease to use and from this I get a mental 'map' of the shape and finished project shouldd look like . Then you can get out of the way any thing you have to look up before you start!

Barbs. X
I agree patterns should be as clear as possible.
I also agree with the idea of becoming familiar with the pattern first before making it. I research all the instructions before I start on something. If I can't understand it I don't make it. I learned to do that during my many years of sewing. Fabric is expensive and often times when you make a mistake you have ruined the garment and cost yourself time and $$$.
 

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I'm with you on these abbreviations - this is not a texting site! When is LOL lots of love or lots of laughs? We aren't teenagers trying to save time - we are trying to share knowledge with others. Let's make ourselves more understandable. That is what maturity is all about!
 

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There were knitting abbreviations generations before there was texting. It's nothing to do with being a teenager. If everything was written out, there would be a price to pay.

The publishers would put less patterns in the books and magazines, to keep it the same number of pages. They know what is cost effective, so either that or we'd pay more.

Personally, I would find it very tiresome to have to read it that way. The abbreviation is eye catching, and saves time.

If it's an online designer, you can almost always contact them by email with a question.
 

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I personally don't mind the abbreviations, and you can usually figure out what they mean, even if they are unusual ones. I don't think I would like using patterns that do not use them...

I have a document that I use that has all the abbreviations I could find on it. I would be happy to share it, it is quite extensive.

Just PM me with your email address if you want it and I will send it as an attachment.
 

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I make a chart of everything I knit. It forces me to read the pattern carefully, and write everything down, then proof it. By the time the chart is finished I am comfortable with what I need to do. If there is a stitch I am not familiar with I write it out long hand under the chart. I put all charts on 4x6 cards and carry them with me.

It works for me, each of us will find with works for them.
 

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Every occupation, hobby, etc. has it's own shorthand and language. We just have to learn it to participate. I do think things should be standardized, but the abbreviations aren't really that difficult once you get used to them.

I don't crochet that often so I am always having to refer back to very basic instructions to remember just what I'm supposed to be doing. I knot sooooo much that I can usually spot errors in the pattern before I knit it. It is all just a matter of time.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Your responses have all been very informative and gave me ideas on how to attack a pattern in much better ways than I have in the past. Having said that, I still contend that there should be some standards/limits on writing patterns. I do not have extensive knowledge on knitting even though I am skilled at the craft. There in lies the problem and I think this is true with many others. I'm one of those people that see a pattern and get excited and want to do immediately and then I crash and burn when the pattern gets beyond me.
 

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weaver1510 said:
Your responses have all been very informative and gave me ideas on how to attack a pattern in much better ways than I have in the past. Having said that, I still contend that there should be some standards/limits on writing patterns. I do not have extensive knowledge on knitting even though I am skilled at the craft. There in lies the problem and I think this is true with many others. I'm one of those people that see a pattern and get excited and want to do immediately and then I crash and burn when the pattern gets beyond me.
I have found whenever I get to that point someone here has the answer, before I have a chance to post a question. :thumbup: There are so many experts here that are willing to share their knowledge and experience with all of us.
 

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Mary Smith said:
I'm with you on these abbreviations - this is not a texting site! When is LOL lots of love or lots of laughs? We aren't teenagers trying to save time - we are trying to share knowledge with others. Let's make ourselves more understandable. That is what maturity is all about!
Mary - I love your avatar! Is that your chihuahua?
 

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weaver1510 said:
After reading post after post with someone (including myself) having problems with pattern directions, wouldn't it make more sense if NO abbreviations were used. If you mean that you should "increase"-write the word "increase" and not make up your own abbreviations. Which is what it appears to me that every designer does. Or you need to go to the website that has every abbreviation and hope that no one invented a new one. I know that this would take up more space, but if it helps one understand the pattern better wouldn't it be worth it???????? What do you think??
No, if you are going to knit from patterns you just need to learn the lingo. Because of space constraints you will almost NEVER see patterns written out in longhand. There are a few, but they are the exception rather than the rule. Just learn the lingo and be able to tackle anything you want to knit.
 

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Sewbizgirl said:
weaver1510 said:
After reading post after post with someone (including myself) having problems with pattern directions, wouldn't it make more sense if NO abbreviations were used. If you mean that you should "increase"-write the word "increase" and not make up your own abbreviations. Which is what it appears to me that every designer does. Or you need to go to the website that has every abbreviation and hope that no one invented a new one. I know that this would take up more space, but if it helps one understand the pattern better wouldn't it be worth it???????? What do you think??
No, if you are going to knit from patterns you just need to learn the lingo. Because of space constraints you will almost NEVER see patterns written out in longhand. There are a few, but they are the exception rather than the rule. Just learn the lingo and be able to tackle anything you want to knit.
But the problem is - the designers do not or will not" learn the lingo", but invent their own.
Not to mention that many designers pick a standard or simple pattern,add some twiddle then claim copyright.
 
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