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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to know what knitting machine I can buy that can do more than blankets scarves etc so if someone here could help me figure that out and if it's I hope it's not going to be a lot of money but yeah thank you
 

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You probably want a machine that can do garter stitch as well as stockinette stitch. I have an LK150, which is among the least expensive knitting machines, but it cannot do garter stitch. (There is a way to do a row of garter stitch using a transfer comb, but it is not easy.)
 

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I need to know what knitting machine I can buy that can do more than blankets scarves etc so if someone here could help me figure that out and if it's I hope it's not going to be a lot of money but yeah thank you

So you would like to knit garments? Sweaters, dresses, baby clothes, socks? That type of knitting? If so, I suggest a standard gauge punchcard knitting machine which uses finer yarns. Before bulky knitting machines came on the market, yarns the weight of Red Heart Super Saver could be knit on standard gauge machines but only knitting with an every other needle set up. For knitting with every needle set up on standard gauge one usually uses light sport weight yarn and finer. Finer yarn being used mostly. Most of the things I've knit on the standard gauge have been knit with yarn that gives 7 or 8 stitches to the inch. I love the lace that can be knit on the standard!
I hope I helped.
Kiwi
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So you would like to knit garments? Sweaters, dresses, baby clothes, socks? That type of knitting? If so, I suggest a standard gauge punchcard knitting machine which uses finer yarns. Before bulky knitting machines came on the market, yarns the weight of Red Heart Super Saver could be knit on standard gauge machines but only knitting with an every other needle set up. For knitting with every needle set up on standard gauge one usually uses light sport weight yarn and finer. Finer yarn being used mostly. Most of the things I've knit on the standard gauge have been knit with yarn that gives 7 or 8 stitches to the inch. I love the lace that can be knit on the standard!
I hope I helped.
Kiwi
Lol what machine or model name where to get it how much etc oh ty
 

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There are manual, punch card, and electronic machines. If you are near a club or use facebook - you can find a group of machine knitters. You can also find them on youtube. The Garter carriage is used on the Brother/Knitking machines only. You can also make the garter stitch with a garter bar on any machine. Depending on where you live, there might be a club near you who will have more information and you can see a machine in action on youtube.
 

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I need to know what knitting machine I can buy that can do more than blankets scarves etc so if someone here could help me figure that out and if it's I hope it's not going to be a lot of money but yeah thank you
All knitting machines knit most things. They come in different gauges, so you need to decide what thickness yarn you are going to use.

Standard gauge is the most common and knits up to UK 4ply/US fingering, and are usually punchcard or electronic patterning.

any machine requires hand manipulation for shaping

if you use Facebook, then join the Machine Knitting Beginners and Returners Circle and look in the Guides for videos on what machines can do
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There are manual, punch card, and electronic machines. If you are near a club or use facebook - you can find a group of machine knitters. You can also find them on youtube. The Garter carriage is used on the Brother/Knitking machines only. You can also make the garter stitch with a garter bar on any machine. Depending on where you live, there might be a club near you who will have more information and you can see a machine in action on youtube.
Could u help me u live in Vancouver Washington
 

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Understand that there is a steep learning curve for any machine. It really helps if you knit by hand but it is a totally different way of knitting. None of the machines, except the plastic bed ones, are cheap, save your dollars and buy a metal bed machine. Look at Youtube. Diana Sullivan's videos are great! It would help if you had hands on advice when beginning, check your LYS or ask around. Some machines do not have garter bars available, so that is another thing to thinks about and decide if you need to buy a machine that accepts them.
 

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Understand that there is a steep learning curve for any machine. It really helps if you knit by hand but it is a totally different way of knitting. None of the machines, except the plastic bed ones, are cheap, save your dollars and buy a metal bed machine. Look at Youtube. Diana Sullivan's videos are great! It would help if you had hands on advice when beginning, check your LYS or ask around. Some machines do not have garter bars available, so that is another thing to thinks about and decide if you need to buy a machine that accepts them.
I can testify to that! I've had mine now for over 2 years and have only learned about 10% of what it's capable of. If you work full time it takes longer (IMHO) since you have less time to spend at it. During the summer/nicer months I have even less time to spend puttering about on it, during winter/colder months I get more time to play.
 

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If you have never used a knitting machine, I suggest you start with an LK150, which costs less than $500. It has a plastic bed and is a good starter machine. Like all knitting machines, it does stockinette as the base stitch. You can also do many other stitches, some of which require hand manipulation. It is not as fast as punch card machines or electronic machines at doing patterning, but it can be done. You can knit sweaters, shawls, socks, dresses, pants, basically, anything you want once you learn to use the machine. I do suggest you start with scarfs and hats to learn how to use the machine. There are lots of Youube videos to help. You may be able to purchase a used punch card machine for not much more, but there are lots of issues with trying to buy a used machine unless you know the seller and you know the seller knows how to use it. I suggest you watch some videos before you buy so you can see the machine in action and decide if that is for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Understand that there is a steep learning curve for any machine. It really helps if you knit by hand but it is a totally different way of knitting. None of the machines, except the plastic bed ones, are cheap, save your dollars and buy a metal bed machine. Look at Youtube. Diana Sullivan's videos are great! It would help if you had hands on advice when beginning, check your LYS or ask around. Some machines do not have garter bars available, so that is another thing to thinks about and decide if you need to buy a machine that accepts them.
Can u explain more
 

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To learn about knitting machines you might find it helpful to read about them here
Information about Knitting Machines: Which is the best?
The above place lets you know which type of machine you should choose for the type of knitting you want to do depending on the weight of yarn you want to use (worsted like Red Heart Super Saver, or sock/fingering weight yarn, etc.)

There is a yarn store in Seattle WA which sells knitting machines and provides classes. They might help you find a more local group of machine knitters.
ALL POINTS YARN - Seattle's South-End Yarn Destination in Des Moines, WA 98198 - 206.824.9276 - Electronic Knitting Machines
They also sell used machines which have been reconditioned (means they are as good as new, but cost less!)

Another place/person to contact for almost local help is April Mills. Her website is http://aprilmills.com/index.htm and she is in Lynwood WA. She might be able to help you find a more local group and she does sell machines both new and refurbished.
Hope you find what you are looking for.
 

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Can u explain more

Rita in Raleigh and Celt Knitter have given very good websites. Read as much as you can then ask lots of questions. Google knitting machines. The LK150 is a plastic bed machine and is about $500. and the LK155 is a metal bed machine that runs about $1,000. I knit both on the machine and by hand. My machine is a metal bed Singer that is about 50 years old and you can not use a garter bar - but that's OK with me. With any non-electronic machine you must use the tools that come with the machine to manually manipulate stitches to make cables, etc. After you have learned how to use it, you do save time with a knitting machine as long as you recognize that you will not be able to make the intricate garments that you can make when you knit by hand. Stockinette is your basic stitch. Check out the websites and Facebook to get as much info as you can. Truely your best bet is to track down a shop or person that sells the machines and ask for demonstrations or lessons. Make a list of your questions and keep going back until you have answers you can understand when you get home - make lots of notes.
 

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Lol what machine or model name where to get it how much etc oh ty
Hi, I'm sorry to just now being able to get back to you. Been a busy day.
I read the messages and it seems to me the others have given you some excellent advice!
One thing I didn't see mentioned is very important...never force the knitting machine carriage... It could cause damage to the machine. One of my favorite machines is the KnitKing Auto kk93 standard gauge punchcard machine.. It has a built in knitleader and a lace carriage comes with it. Brother probably has the same machine but I don't know which model it is. I wish you well in finding just the machine you want!
Kiwi
 

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I need to know what knitting machine I can buy that can do more than blankets scarves etc so if someone here could help me figure that out and if it's I hope it's not going to be a lot of money but yeah thank you
The first important question to ask yourself is 'what weight (ie thickness) of yarn do I want to knit?' The answer to that will begin to narrow down the choice of machines, as one machine CANNOT and DOES NOT knit all the different thicknesses of yarn from laceweight to super-chunky.
When you have decided what thickness of yarn you mostly want to work with, you need to look at your budget and the machines which are available in your area.

All machines, even the simplest and cheapest, will knit a lot more than blankets and scarves; in fact blankets and scarves are not really the easiest things to knit on a knitting machine for a range of reasons including the absolute limit to the number of needles on all metal-bed machines, thus restricting the number of stitches (and thus needing to knit blankets in panels and decide on ways of joining said panels, either after knitting or while knitting) and the need for countering the inevitable 'rolling into a narrow tube' tendency of 'pure' stocking stitch, when knitting a scarf ...

Remember, too, that flat-bed knitting machines are exactly that, flat, and are at their best when knitting flat panels using seams as construction for the finished pieces. Circular knitting can be done on most (but not all) machines, but with limitations.

I concur with what others have said about 'a learning curve'. It can often be quite steep ...
 

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I stumbled across my Silver Reed mashine at the trift store and got lucky in getting a lace carriage for very little money and a somewhat beat up ribber as well.

I'm mechanically savvy, so looking at videos and service manuals helps me a lot when things doesn't work out. I'll have to fix my lace carriage after I found that it doesn't do what it's supposed to do. I don't have a local repair shop, since most people in Sweden don't use knitting machines.

Machine knitting takes time to learn and it's easier if you know your machine is in perfect working condition. Once you get started you will learn what your machine can do, how it works and what it feels like when it doesn't like the yarn or the settings. You'll learn how far you can push it, and you'll learn not to freak out when things doesn't work properly. I don't worry when the carriage jams anymore, but the first few times were really frightening. Now I know what to do and how to fix the errors in the knitting.

I knew I wanted a knitting machine because I love knitting but hate doing it by hand. If you're not sure it's your thing, then try one and see how it feels.

The others have provided you with excellent information and links.
 
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