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Back when we were little, I think most of us started on dpns and working with 5 needles on gloves or hats was second nature. Long needles were next and I didn't have variety of sizes and had to learn to adjust tightness as I went along.
Even now, needle size is not that important to me unless it is very fine yarn. Following old garment for shaping was easy. Nobody would worry about few stitches here and there on sides when shaping as long as pattern stitches aligned. We learned fancy stitches and just made stuff up. I saw my first pattern when I was about 14. In the magazine and it was crocheted vest. I just counted stitches in the picture and duplicated it.
I got my first circular needles here in US and loved it since day one. No need for corks on the ends to lose your knitting!
Now a days there is so much info, so much pretty yarn. I am surprised there isn't more people knitting! Wonder if the pandemic created new knitters!
I learned to knit with 4 needles. First thing I ever knit was socks. It was 4 years before I used two needles. I live on the Canadian border and work in a nursing home. Lots of French Residents knit and use 5 needles instead of just four.
 

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Back when we were little, I think most of us started on dpns and working with 5 needles on gloves or hats was second nature. Long needles were next and I didn't have variety of sizes and had to learn to adjust tightness as I went along.
Even now, needle size is not that important to me unless it is very fine yarn. Following old garment for shaping was easy. Nobody would worry about few stitches here and there on sides when shaping as long as pattern stitches aligned. We learned fancy stitches and just made stuff up. I saw my first pattern when I was about 14. In the magazine and it was crocheted vest. I just counted stitches in the picture and duplicated it.
I got my first circular needles here in US and loved it since day one. No need for corks on the ends to lose your knitting!
Now a days there is so much info, so much pretty yarn. I am surprised there isn't more people knitting! Wonder if the pandemic created new knitters!
I didn’t learn to knit until I was in my fifties…I tried once in my thirties and couldn’t get it. Without detailed written instructions I would never have figured it out. As for DPN they were a nightmare…I still only use them to finish the toes of socks. Must be like everything else…it is easier to learn as a child. I did learn to crochet as a child…but the only thing I remember is single and double crochet…so now I am a much better knitter.
 

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I learned to knit when I was about five years of age and now I am 95 years young so have been knitting for over 90 years, I call myself experienced. If there is one thing that I have learned is that there are always new and better ways of learning to do the same things one has been doing for many years. It is wonderful to belong to a site like this, all the camaraderie and willingness to share everything. I won first prize all over England when I was ten years, making a silk knitted baby set, I can still remember it. Mother basted it out onto cardboard covered with aluminum and mailed it in. I was so overjoyed, it was close to Christmas and I spent my winnings buying presents for a number of folks that gave me so much pleasure.
Happy knitting and crochet everyone! :):knitting1:
 

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I have been knitting for at least 75 years, learned before Kdgn. I still have the 2nd article I completed - a garter st doll blanket - pinned to my studio wall.
Before there was a TKGA there was the TNNA - (The National Needlework Assn).
I worked in a knit shop in the early 80s and the owner invited several of us to enroll in certification classes - held during spring break here in the Midwest on the campus of Purdue Uni - and over the period of several years I took certification in knitting and tatting.

From their brochure: “ TKGA owes an enormous debt to the early founders and leaders of TKGA. Members, teachers and designers like …..Evie Rosen…”

Evie Rosen taught several of the knit courses I qualified in and I considered her a prime example of Mentor. Somewhere in my stash I have several of the patts & booklets she authored and autographed.
There was one other instructor who still sticks out in my memory due to her rather abrasive personality. I have another photo in my ‘stuff’ of her critiquing the garment I designed and wore for the final cert level. Shortly after this - in 1985, from their online FAQs - the TKGA was formed and I went on to other pursuits. Now, in my Sr years, I have returned to my fave skill - knitting - where I knit approx 4 - 8 hrs daily, for 4 charities and our GrGrandies.
 

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What does ist matter which level one's knitting skill is - as long as it is fun for the knitter?!
If you fancy a certain pattern or project, then you will definitely master it.
At least that's what I believe!
True yet it was not only entertaining but informative for me as I had no idea according to his little test I am an expert level knitter. I advanced quickly in most areas and I agree everyone has their own pace and what they want to do. If you think you an you most certainly can!
 

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Have you ever wondered what level your knitting skill is at? I have just watched this interesting video clip on You Tube about this. I didn't have to listen for very long, as I'm only up to Advanced Beginner Level 3!

If it appeals, how much further can you get, and can you please report back to us with your current knitting skill level? Hoping somebody else is at my same level!!

Here's the link:
I only crochet & haven’t learned knitting yet
So watching link won’t gauge my level of knowledge yet 😞
 

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I agree that if you like something enough you will figure out how to do it. I have not gone through all his stages, because it doesn't matter to me. Having said that after knitting and crocheting since childhood, I still consider myself a "plain knitter". Meaning I tend to gravitate towards the easier patterns. I am currently knitting two socks in one using afterthought heels, and am wondering why I never tried them before. I am using three flexi flips, and boy it is so easy. I am really enjoying it, and I think that is the most important thing...for me anyway.
 

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Wow, this was fun and enlightening. Before watching this video, I would have guessed an advanced intermediate. But I managed to advance two more levels…mostly thanks to KP members posting their finished projects and being very generous with sharing their knowledge.
The only thing that I really question is the part about seeing a finished article and being able to copy it. My sister and I use to copy knitting/crochet/sewing articles of clothing that appeared in Vogue and other fashion magazines when we were in high school. 😊
I still have a Perry Ellis cabled vest that was copied at age seventeen. Though it can no longer be worn due to the small size, I still enjoy occasionally looking at it. My stitch gauge was much better then as opposed to now.
Thank you for sharing this video.
In the 70s, I was a contract knitter for Perry Ellis Hand Knits. Knitting on New York City subways, I was accosted one day and told I was “doing it wrong.” (I didn’t know it at the time, but I knit Combined Continental, just as Grandma taught me at age four). When I told the woman that the finished vest would be sold at Bloomingdale’s for $350, she was taken aback. Of course, I was paid far, far less than that for my piece work!
 

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In the 70s, I was a contract knitter for Perry Ellis Hand Knits. Knitting on New York City subways, I was accosted one day and told I was “doing it wrong.” (I didn’t know it at the time, but I knit Combined Continental, just as Grandma taught me at age four). When I told the woman that the finished vest would be sold at Bloomingdale’s for $350, she was taken aback. Of course, I was paid far, far less than that for my piece work!
I knitted a pullover for a shop one time in the 80s. It was 8ply/DK with an intarsia farm scene on the front. They gave me the pattern and yarn and told me the size to do. I'm not a very fast knitter and it took me a whole month to finish including the mattress stitch seaming and knitting the neck band. I was so disappointed with the pittance they paid me, knowing it would be sold for hundreds of $. It just wasn't worth it to me to repeat... I had other stuff I wanted to knit... It was a learning experience, but it was fun working the intarsia front of the pullover... Wish I'd taken a photo of it...
 

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In the 70s, I was a contract knitter for Perry Ellis Hand Knits. Knitting on New York City subways, I was accosted one day and told I was “doing it wrong.” (I didn’t know it at the time, but I knit Combined Continental, just as Grandma taught me at age four). When I told the woman that the finished vest would be sold at Bloomingdale’s for $350, she was taken aback. Of course, I was paid far, far less than that for my piece work!
I began knitting in NYC in 1954, on public transit the next year. My grandmother taught me what she knew, which turns out to be a mashup of Continental and Combined Continental. I lost count of how many times I was told I was “doing it wrong”, just because the yarn was in my left hand. Not one of those numb naysayers ever offered any constructive criticism. It was only in the 1970s that I discovered why - in stockinette - my alternate rows had twisted stitches. I didn’t know enough to knit through the leading leg to avoid the twist, so I changed the way I purl.
 

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In the 70s, I was a contract knitter for Perry Ellis Hand Knits. Knitting on New York City subways, I was accosted one day and told I was “doing it wrong.” (I didn’t know it at the time, but I knit Combined Continental, just as Grandma taught me at age four). When I told the woman that the finished vest would be sold at Bloomingdale’s for $350, she was taken aback. Of course, I was paid far, far less than that for my piece work!
I am so happy you shared this story. You must have enjoyed working on such beautiful designs.
I also learned Combined Continental from my Grandmother, but at the age of seven.
My Church group, which included a Lion Brand manager, constantly insisted that I knitted “all wrong”. I eventually quietly left the group.
It was not until I joined KP that I could put a name to the style.
 

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Interesting video - I am at level confused - I learned to knit age 5 in infant school but didn't do anything with that basic knowledge until early teens when aged 13 I made myself a Fair-isle sweater. I didn't really take to knitting because my aunts and mother laughed at the way I held my needles - they said I knit like I was poking the fire!
I learned to crochet at age 15 when I made a 'fashionable' poncho. I made a few things when I was expecting my children but didn't bother to carry on. I took up knitting again when aged 60 when stressed at work and grandchildren were coming along. I mastered '5 needle in the round' when I got a kit which included a pattern for a hat when my first grandchild was due 26 years ago.
According to the video I am borderline 'Advanced' because of some of the things I have achieved and yet I haven't mastered some of the basics yet - I can cast on/off, knit, purl, increase and decrease and follow the instructions given in a pattern - especially paying attention to the instructions in "Abbreviations". I knit the youngest grandson an Aran sweater, an older one I inserted his favourite character in a plain sweater by making my own Intarsia chart with graph paper. This may sound like bragging but this is the confusion - I still consider myself to be basic/intermediate it is not because I can't it is because I don't feel the need to. I have never knitted either socks or gloves and have no intention of ever doing so - despite buying some sock yarn about 15 years ago - which still sits in my stash!
At present I have picked up neither needles or hooks since the beginning of Covid lockdown - I have a box of unfinished WIPS my MOJO like Elvis has left the building!
 

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Interesting video - I am at level confused - I learned to knit age 5 in infant school but didn't do anything with that basic knowledge until early teens when aged 13 I made myself a Fair-isle sweater. I didn't really take to knitting because my aunts and mother laughed at the way I held my needles - they said I knit like I was poking the fire!
I learned to crochet at age 15 when I made a 'fashionable' poncho. I made a few things when I was expecting my children but didn't bother to carry on. I took up knitting again when aged 60 when stressed at work and grandchildren were coming along. I mastered '5 needle in the round' when I got a kit which included a pattern for a hat when my first grandchild was due 26 years ago.
According to the video I am borderline 'Advanced' because of some of the things I have achieved and yet I haven't mastered some of the basics yet - I can cast on/off, knit, purl, increase and decrease and follow the instructions given in a pattern - especially paying attention to the instructions in "Abbreviations". I knit the youngest grandson an Aran sweater, an older one I inserted his favourite character in a plain sweater by making my own Intarsia chart with graph paper. This may sound like bragging but this is the confusion - I still consider myself to be basic/intermediate it is not because I can't it is because I don't feel the need to. I have never knitted either socks or gloves and have no intention of ever doing so - despite buying some sock yarn about 15 years ago - which still sits in my stash!
At present I have picked up neither needles or hooks since the beginning of Covid lockdown - I have a box of unfinished WIPS my MOJO like Elvis has left the building!
Thank you for sharing! I do hope something you see or read here will spark your interest in knitting or crochet again. :)
 

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Interesting video - I am at level confused - I learned to knit age 5 in infant school but didn't do anything with that basic knowledge until early teens when aged 13 I made myself a Fair-isle sweater. I didn't really take to knitting because my aunts and mother laughed at the way I held my needles - they said I knit like I was poking the fire!
I learned to crochet at age 15 when I made a 'fashionable' poncho. I made a few things when I was expecting my children but didn't bother to carry on. I took up knitting again when aged 60 when stressed at work and grandchildren were coming along. I mastered '5 needle in the round' when I got a kit which included a pattern for a hat when my first grandchild was due 26 years ago.
According to the video I am borderline 'Advanced' because of some of the things I have achieved and yet I haven't mastered some of the basics yet - I can cast on/off, knit, purl, increase and decrease and follow the instructions given in a pattern - especially paying attention to the instructions in "Abbreviations". I knit the youngest grandson an Aran sweater, an older one I inserted his favourite character in a plain sweater by making my own Intarsia chart with graph paper. This may sound like bragging but this is the confusion - I still consider myself to be basic/intermediate it is not because I can't it is because I don't feel the need to. I have never knitted either socks or gloves and have no intention of ever doing so - despite buying some sock yarn about 15 years ago - which still sits in my stash!
At present I have picked up neither needles or hooks since the beginning of Covid lockdown - I have a box of unfinished WIPS my MOJO like Elvis has left the building!
Many of us lost our mojo due to the pandemic. It is difficult to sit, focus, and enjoy making something when you have so many fears to worried about. Just know your love of making something will return. For me, I joined two make-alongs. One was for Swedenme's baby onesie and the other was for Sandj's wash cloth. Maybe a simple make-along where you are interacting with others might help.
 

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WOW I was truly surprised to find myself at a "solid" Level 5 Advanced level with some beginning Master Knitter knowledge. I have been asked a few times to help someone out with a knitting problem they were having and the first time it happened I actually laughed to myself - I couldn't believe they were asking for my advice. 😊 I am still very uncomfortable doing any "color work", fair isle, brioche etc. and have yet to knit up a pair of socks (!) and I have to admit that I can do a lace pattern relatively well - after one or two restarts, till I find the "secret" of the pattern. Mostly I got in to knitting hats and chemo caps for charity but I still have the first sweater jacket I knitted (lots of cables) when I was in my 20s along with my Mother in Law's help and I learned back then that I'd have to figure out how to adjust the sleeves (I must have very short arms!) and length of most patterns, but that never held me back - challenge accepted - I've made myself a few now.
But I do agree that no matter what, knitting should bring you joy and relaxation.
 

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Thanks so much for your encouraging words! Next step on my knitting level journey is to learn cabling. It's so rewarding to acquire a new skill!

I have been doing adult cables for years & it has really taken a toll on my hands. I think this one for one of my GS will be my last. The pain is getting unbearable. I think crocheting for so many years has done most of the damage, sadly.
 

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I have been doing adult cables for years & it has really taken a toll on my hands. I think this one for one of my GS will be my last. The pain is getting unbearable. I think crocheting for so many years has done most of the damage, sadly.
Is the pain in your hands from arthritis or carpal tunnel?
My MIL knitted for years using elastic fingerless gloves due to arthritis in her thumbs. She also used them for driving and she ordered them from somewhere.
they were cheap and eventually lost their elasticity but she didn’t care because they cost so little she simply ordered another case of them.
she didn’t have a computer, so my guess is that she saw in an ad in a magazine.
you can probably find some online, if you think that will help.
 
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