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Often our tension changes when going from a knit to a purl stitch and you may tense up or try to intentionally relax before going into the cable - hence it is more pronounced just before you do the cable.
Just remember that all stitches, even cables are just knit and purl and try not to think too hard before your cables. Practise on a wash cloth/dish cloth.
Cheers
Sue
 

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You could probably use a darning needle to fix the tension bringing the slack back to the knot.
 

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Looks like your tension is a bit tight on the left-leaning cable ... Maybe it's pulling the other stitches over and it's more obvious in the knit stitch? I read somewhere recently that left leaning cables tend to be differently tensioned than right leaning.

Also, I tend to knit English-style on cables, but combined elsewhere which makes it tighter for me. Are you changing it up at all in dealing with the cable needle?
 

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I agree that blocking is the way to take care of it afterwards. I think all yarns can be blocked; use a spray bottle to wet it down and take some kind of needle and even your stitches out then allow it to dry. Should be fine.
 

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I can see what you are talking about..it is more noticable...about every 4th row...it has to be in your tension...and you can use a darning needle..or hope that laundering or blocking, will ease it out. but when doing cables, this can be the nature of the beast...
 

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maybe your purl is just a bit looser than your knit. since it seems a little better on different rows, maybe when you pull the yarn forward to purl you are changing your tension a little different times having a tad more slack in betwen stitches.
 

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KEgan said:
It looks fine, to me. :) :thumbup:
I agree. Every once in a while and at the end of a row, I make sure that all my stitches are secure (for instance --on the cable portion of my circular needle) and then I stretch my work every which way (side to side, up and down, diagonal). It may not be a "good" thing to do. But I feel that it helps with some of the minor irregularities that occur with a hand made project ;)
 

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I'm an American/English knitter. When changing from a knit stitch to a purl stitch, I find it important to be sure to tug the yarn when I yarn forward to make sure I don't leave any slack yarn behind/between the needle tips. I also find I need to hold the last stitch I just made snugly to the working needle to make sure it doesn't loosen up while I throw the yarn for the purl stitch. And lastly, on subsequent purl stitches, I have to make sure I don't throw the yarn underneath the bump on the purl stitch I just made. Details, details! It does become second nature after a while . . .
 

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I'm a very tight knitter, using continental style, and I find that I need to hold my last knit stitch in place on the right needle with my finger and thumb while making my first purl stitch--otherwise they kind of turn into conjoined twins! So depending on your style and tension, you may just need to experiment a bit to find some minor adjustment to your process that will even out your stitches on those changes. I like to think of that as playing around with stitches, so I won't get frustrated while trying to figure out a solution.
 

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I can see what you mean. Are you by chance knitting continental style, that is holding working yarn in left hand?
I do, and my purl sts are looser than my knit sts, so I try to adjust that while I knit. Anyway, as has been said, blocking will even this out. Pretty cable!
 

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Ok, so, you gave us a picture of your work from very very close up - - Be honest, now. When you are finished, will you be viewing the item that closely? My guess is that you (or other people) will not be inspecting the individual stitches, and will be looking at the overall effect of the whole item. Those few stitches will NOT be noticed.

Normal wearing and washing and drying will help to even out the stitches, as will blocking at the end.

The only time I would ever worry about something so tiny and negligible would be if I was entering the piece in a juried show and I wanted to win the first place honour....
 
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