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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wouldn't it be really useful to have a chart that showed how much yarn was required to knit various items in different thickness of yarn, especially cardigans and sweaters.
Now that I'm using my Knitradar more and am moving away from using a pattern I'm never sure how much yarn is needed and I'm getting tired of thumbing through patterns to try and find a match to what I want to make.
We've had some handy charts for yarns and machine types posted recently - has anyone seen one for for yarn quantities?
Fingers crossed someone has! Moira
 

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GrammaAnn said:
Well, thank you. So sweet! :) I have just saved anything anyone suggested and anything I came across surfing knitting sites. I am glad it is a help to someone. :) Ann
Ahhhh. That's what I started doing. Good to know I'm on the right track.
 

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mpalmer said:
Wouldn't it be really useful to have a chart that showed how much yarn was required to knit various items in different thickness of yarn, especially cardigans and sweaters.
Now that I'm using my Knitradar more and am moving away from using a pattern I'm never sure how much yarn is needed and I'm getting tired of thumbing through patterns to try and find a match to what I want to make.
We've had some handy charts for yarns and machine types posted recently - has anyone seen one for for yarn quantities?
Fingers crossed someone has! Moira
Hello there - if you are using your Knitradar I assume you are knitting a tension swatch. I always weigh my tension swatch and work out how many stitches are in it (multiply total rows by total stitches). Then I look at the garment size and work out how many stitches the same way. For back and front of a jumper I multiply the total rows by the beginning stitches and for the sleeves the total rows by half the widest number of stitches. This seems to be a fairly close approximation and when I add up all the stitches in the garment and divide it by the stitches in the tension swatch I get a number I multiply by the weight of the tension swatch. It sounds complicated but it is very easy once you try it. I am always trying to use up yarn and wanting to know if I have enough. This system works pretty well for me. It may help you as well. Sometimes I knit a whole ball of wool as my tension swatch as I know what that weighs and then, if there is wool left over make a coat hanger cover with the tension swatch. Good luck!
 

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madkiwi said:
Great stuff! Now all I need is a chart to convert the terms "fine" , "medium" etc into dk,4ply etc!

Seriously thanx for the link. Very useful.

Madkiwi
0 or Lace Thread, Cobweb and Lace 1 - 3 ply
1 or Superfine Fingering 4 ply
2 or Fine Sport 5 ply
3 or Light DK 8 ply
4 or Medium Worsted 10 ply
5 or Bulky 12 ply
6 or Super Bulky
 

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JillKay said:
Hello there - if you are using your Knitradar I assume you are knitting a tension swatch. I always weigh my tension swatch and work out how many stitches are in it (multiply total rows by total stitches). Then I look at the garment size and work out how many stitches the same way. For back and front of a jumper I multiply the total rows by the beginning stitches and for the sleeves the total rows by half the widest number of stitches. This seems to be a fairly close approximation and when I add up all the stitches in the garment and divide it by the stitches in the tension swatch I get a number I multiply by the weight of the tension swatch. It sounds complicated but it is very easy once you try it. I am always trying to use up yarn and wanting to know if I have enough. This system works pretty well for me. It may help you as well. Sometimes I knit a whole ball of wool as my tension swatch as I know what that weighs and then, if there is wool left over make a coat hanger cover with the tension swatch. Good luck!
The link GrammaAnn sent explains this:
http://erica.co.uk/patterns/estyarnqty.pdf
 

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I weigh the cone of yarn then knock off 30grms for the cone inner. Some cone inners only weigh 22grms but I always knock off 30grms to be on the safe side. I then jot down how much yarn I believe I have and knit the back of the garment. Once this is knitted I weigh it. I know that I need roughly the same again for the front and the same yet again for the two sleeves. If I still believe I have enough yarn to complete the garment then I knit a sleeve and weigh that...the sleeve weight plus the back weight is half needed so if I still have half the original cone weight plus a bit for the neck I carry on and knit the lot.
Of course if you have done a really complicated stitch pattern it can be annoying to find (after knitting the back) that you probably wont have enough yarn for all of the rest of the garment but you can carry on and do 3/4 or short sleeves.....or maybe a scooped or V neck to save yarn that way.
I hope that you can understand this.
 

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It's one thing, Ann, in downloading and saving links etc., but being able to bring them up the instant they are required does require good organisation skills.

I would just like to add to the original question/ answers that keeping good personal records of everything you knit also helps when it comes to estimating the amount of yarn required for future garments. Get a good big ledger and write down everything to do with each garment, including its final weight. Add on a little for test swatches and wastage along the way and you will know what you need next time you use that exact yarn, or a very similar one. Include a photo of the garment too so that you have a wonderful record of all your knits - especially if you tend to knit for other people rather than yourself.
Did I do all this, well off and on and not very well.....
Sheila
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
rainbirdoz said:
It's one thing, Ann, in downloading and saving links etc., but being able to bring them up the instant they are required does require good organisation skills.

I would just like to add to the original question/ answers that keeping good personal records of everything you knit also helps when it comes to estimating the amount of yarn required for future garments. Get a good big ledger and write down everything to do with each garment, including its final weight. Add on a little for test swatches and wastage along the way and you will know what you need next time you use that exact yarn, or a very similar one. Include a photo of the garment too so that you have a wonderful record of all your knits - especially if you tend to knit for other people rather than yourself.
Did I do all this, well off and on and not very well.....
Sheila
A brilliant idea, Sheila - wish you'd told me about 6 years ago! Moira
 
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