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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Someone posted this on my Facebook Wall and I thought I was worth sharing here:
 

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I have posted this experience before. I went to bed one night and saw that my adult cat was playing with a small ball of yarn. Since I didn't care about the yarn I let her have it. The next day she wasn't well and I couldn't find the yarn.
The had swallowed it. She was no better the next day so I got her to the vet. He said she wouldn't have lasted another day. He had to do as major an operation as it could get. That yarn had to be removed from her intestines in little tiny pieces. It was a very, very expensive lesson and I almost lost my precious little pet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Even tho the pic is directed to cats, it also applies to puppies ... they will eat ANYTHING. My vet told me I would not believe some of the things he has removed from dogs' stomachs.

Also, with the holiday season approaching, those with animals prone to eating non-food items should be especially careful with the icicles that go on the Christmas tree. I used to have a cat that tried to eat them :(

I consider myself quite fortunate right now to have a dog that doesn't eat anything except what I give her.
 

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Any string, yarn and tinsel is deadly to a cat. Worked for a vet and saw this so many times. If you want to play with your cat with yarn, play and then put it away. I stopped putting garland on my tree also. They rip tiny pieces off of it while playing and swallow it. I fill in the holes with big poinsetta flowers and it makes the tree more pretty.
 

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The worst thing I ever witnessed while aiding a vet was a dog that had somehow swallowed a tampon. The tampon, which when absorbs grows in size, had become lodged in the intestine right below the stomach. It had swelled to where it was almost tearing the intestine from the pressure and nothing could leave the stomach because the opening to the intestinal tract was blocked solid. As humans we don't think about things, even as pet owners we sometimes don't see the dangers. Fortunately the dog in question here survived the surgery and went on to live a long and happy life. Many animals that get into other stuff like tampax don't survive and those pet owners that are too cheap to take a pet to the vet to find out what is wrong with them will never be educated to the dangers out there and how they can affect pets. I will add that the thin gloves that medical professionals/food handlers/cosmeticians use can kill a pet faster then you could ever imagine. Sad but true =(
 
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