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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Feeling rather pleased with myself as I've just managed an invisible seem on the back of a baby Ugg Boot. it was quite tricky as the baby's boot is small and, of course, you have to sew the seem to make a small tube.

I do have the KNITTING ANSWER BOOK by Margaret Radcliffe, but I like to search online for 'how to' demonstrations and explanations. The internet is really wonderful when it is used well. Hoping to finish boots tomorrow and then I'll post a pic.
 

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Try looking up mattress stitch on the internet. The results are amazing and the stitch is fairly easy to do. I think that Berroco.com offers a video about how to do it. Try this you-tube link posted by Berroco
Congrats on finishing your project. Always a nice feeling to knit a garment with love.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just about to post a pic. They're nothing new and not even brilliantly done, but I loved knitting them. Also, learning mattress stitch was something I really needed to do as I have my grand daughter's sweater to sew up (When I've finally finished it)

These boots are too big because I just used wool that was sitting in my small stash, and misread the needle size for the gauge measurement. BUT they are a success to me :D
 

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Yes, Mattress St, also called Ladder st. Absolutely the BEST at seaming.
The problem with Ladder St, as most ppl describe it, is that they work the needle in directly opposite where the needle exits. This will create puckers; the needle must go back into the holes on each side that the thread/yarn is coming out of. The wrong was of 'laddering' is more of an 'H' shape. A true Mattress St is shaped like 'Z' on its side.

The most important thing is ALWAYS go back into the SAME hole you came out of, no matter how many bars you went under with your needle. I've usually used used a 2-bar method; one bar was a bit of an overkill and was like flaring out crepe paper along the edges—just too much seaming thread for most projects.

You can ease in extra material on either side this way, too, going under an extra bar or two until you're even in row count again.
Bobbie
 
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